Ramenoodles

2+ Year Member
Sep 23, 2018
10
1
I retook 6 of my science based classes in undergrad. It wasn't that I didn't get the material. The problem was I had horrible study skills and always procrastinated. The second time around I got A's and B's on all of them. But my previous grade still shows on the transcript. How badly will this affect my admission into med school? Is there ANYTHING else I can do to increase my chances?? please give me some suggestions im desperate. My MCAT score is high. I also volunteer and work so i can add that to my application as well.

I know I won't get into "top" schools but honestly i'll just be glad if i get accepted anywhere.

ps. please don't leave rude or snarky comments im already upset at myself for messing up this bad and already feel like a failure
 

Blanky

2+ Year Member
Mar 12, 2017
1,584
1,421
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Find an Amcas excel for gpa and plug it all in and then see what your cGPA is going to be.
 

Ramenoodles

2+ Year Member
Sep 23, 2018
10
1
Find an Amcas excel for gpa and plug it all in and then see what your cGPA is going to be.
Cumulative is 2.9 barley. Even if I did really well the second time around I bombed the first attempt so that decreased it a lot. Thanks for replying so fast I really appreciate it. If you have any suggestions/ advice it would be super helpful.
 
About the Ads

culturekweenXx

2+ Year Member
Oct 7, 2018
85
211
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
What year are you now? When do you loosely plan on applying? Have you considered post-baccalaureate education or a master's program to raise your GPA? I really doubt a 2.9 is going to be enough.
 

workaholic181

2+ Year Member
May 29, 2017
1,292
849
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Cumulative is 2.9 barley. Even if I did really well the second time around I bombed the first attempt so that decreased it a lot. Thanks for replying so fast I really appreciate it. If you have any suggestions/ advice it would be super helpful.

You could maybe get into newer DO schools that reward reinvention. If you're boning for an MD you're gonna need a SMP most likely.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

Blanky

2+ Year Member
Mar 12, 2017
1,584
1,421
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Get those cum and sci over 3.0 and that with NO grade replacement? How high is your MCAT?
You can either get into a decent DO or SMP into a MD maybe.
 

AlbinoHawk DO

An Osteopath
7+ Year Member
Oct 19, 2013
4,914
5,639
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
Cumulative is 2.9 barley. Even if I did really well the second time around I bombed the first attempt so that decreased it a lot. Thanks for replying so fast I really appreciate it. If you have any suggestions/ advice it would be super helpful.
Not gonna lie. The cards are stacked against you. If you manage to get around a 3.2 and a decent MCAT you can likely get into a new school
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users

balston82

2+ Year Member
Jan 23, 2016
84
78
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Bro i had a 0.7 freshman year. Nail the MCAT, nail an smp and nothing is impossible. Harder path for sure but it can be done
 
  • Like
Reactions: 5 users

Goro

SDN Gold Donor
10+ Year Member
Jun 11, 2010
65,696
101,191
Somewhere west of St. Louis
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
I retook 6 of my science based classes in undergrad. It wasn't that I didn't get the material. The problem was I had horrible study skills and always procrastinated. The second time around I got A's and B's on all of them. But my previous grade still shows on the transcript. How badly will this affect my admission into med school? Is there ANYTHING else I can do to increase my chances?? please give me some suggestions im desperate. My MCAT score is high. I also volunteer and work so i can add that to my application as well.

I know I won't get into "top" schools but honestly i'll just be glad if i get accepted anywhere.

ps. please don't leave rude or snarky comments im already upset at myself for messing up this bad and already feel like a failure
Read this:
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users

Medic741

2+ Year Member
Jan 18, 2017
1,108
1,658
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
I retook 6 of my science based classes in undergrad. It wasn't that I didn't get the material. The problem was I had horrible study skills and always procrastinated. The second time around I got A's and B's on all of them. But my previous grade still shows on the transcript. How badly will this affect my admission into med school? Is there ANYTHING else I can do to increase my chances?? please give me some suggestions im desperate. My MCAT score is high. I also volunteer and work so i can add that to my application as well.

I know I won't get into "top" schools but honestly i'll just be glad if i get accepted anywhere.

ps. please don't leave rude or snarky comments im already upset at myself for messing up this bad and already feel like a failure
Ask if this is the right path for you -- struggling in the basic sciences in UG might indicate that med school could eat you alive. Seriously take some time to consider if this is the right path and if there's anything else that could make you happy -- if so do that other thing. 10/10 not worth it if you can see yourself doing something else.
 

Ragtime

An underdog
7+ Year Member
Jan 11, 2012
93
33
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
For what it's worth, I had multiple F's, W's, C's early in my undergrad career, but managed to gain admission into a DO school this year. Considering your high MCAT (and hopefully adequate ECs), my practical advice would be to take more science classes (preferably upper-division) and get your GPAs around/above a 3.2, then apply DO programs early (especially to all the newer schools). This is just my opinion.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
Jan 15, 2018
48
37
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Honestly, it will be very very difficult but not impossible. I graduated undergrad with a 2.9 science gpa and 3.1 gpa. I did have to take two years off and did a one year masters where I graduated #1 in my class with a 4.0 gpa. I believe that was the only reason I got accepted. It is possible to get in but you would likely have to do either a post-bac/masters and kill it to show admissions you are capable. Even when I did that I was waitlisted and got lucky enough to get in. I know the feeling, best of luck.
 
About the Ads

JSReed

7+ Year Member
Aug 11, 2011
272
250
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student (Accepted)
There are plenty of threads on similar topics-- their situations might be slightly different, but the overall advice is the same. Also, please note that AACOM is no longer doing grade replacement, so the setting has changed a bit since the 2000s.

Here's the thing: you can sit here and download a gpa calculator and try to figure out what your gpa might be and how many credits of 4.0 you need to hit 3.X and what classes you can fit in and how many years before you can apply and etc. etc. etc. I have been in that exact same situation (finished my sophomore year with a 2.5) and have spent and ungodly amount of time doing that. But the major thing you need to figure out is HOW you are going to do better. Plenty of people say "I know I can do better" when they haven't gotten an A since high school. They end up using their same study habits (either partying all the time or studying ineffectively all the time) and continuing to perform at a low standard. If it's problems at home, maybe take some time off. If you're repeatedly underperforming in science classes, cut your courseload to 0 or 1 science courses per semester and slowly scale back up. Even if it takes you an extra year or 2/3, its worth it (especially now that grade replacement is gone). Look over all your old exams, pick out which questions you got wrong, why you got them wrong, and how you're going to change your study strategy to not get them wrong in the future. These steps are key to identifying and addressing the issues you have. Sounds like your a procrastinator-- if it were me, I would take each major benchmark (ex. bio exam), create intermediate goals (by X date I will have read X chapter, by X date I will have taken and analyzed a practice exam, etc), and create penalties for every goal you miss (burpees have worked phenomenally for me). Could work it as a rewards system, but tbh I've found punishment more effective. All of this is just to give you an example of the things you should be thinking about, you now have to run your own diagnostics and put in the hard miles.

After (and only after) you've identified and addressed your issues (aka semester gpa > 3.5), time to start to figure out next steps (note: this may be during undergraduate or post-bacc, depends how long it takes you). The 3 adcoms I've talked to told me that to be considered adequate for med school, you need 3 years of good academic performance (I understood this as 3.5 minimum). Once you've done that, you're looking at MCAT (I'd guess you'd need 510+ alongside the 3.0-3.3 ugpa), potentially more post-bacc, or an SMP with a strong linkage (because IMO the ones without are just trying to beat you up and take your lunch money). But all of this is AFTER you figure out what is going on, do that first paragraph, and get some success.

My basis: I have been in those shoes and am applying now (3.0, 516, SMP at 3.5+, extensive shadowing and volunteer/professional experience). I can barely get DO schools to look at me after multiple cycles (have been told its for quantitative reasons). It's not impossible to get in from your position--but it requires immediate and intensive action before you dig a deeper hole for yourself (aka me).

Sorry if this seemed ranty/rambley/mean, just wish someone had done this to me a few years back...
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users

Goro

SDN Gold Donor
10+ Year Member
Jun 11, 2010
65,696
101,191
Somewhere west of St. Louis
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
There are plenty of threads on similar topics-- their situations might be slightly different, but the overall advice is the same. Also, please note that AACOM is no longer doing grade replacement, so the setting has changed a bit since the 2000s.

Here's the thing: you can sit here and download a gpa calculator and try to figure out what your gpa might be and how many credits of 4.0 you need to hit 3.X and what classes you can fit in and how many years before you can apply and etc. etc. etc. I have been in that exact same situation (finished my sophomore year with a 2.5) and have spent and ungodly amount of time doing that. But the major thing you need to figure out is HOW you are going to do better. Plenty of people say "I know I can do better" when they haven't gotten an A since high school. They end up using their same study habits (either partying all the time or studying ineffectively all the time) and continuing to perform at a low standard. If it's problems at home, maybe take some time off. If you're repeatedly underperforming in science classes, cut your courseload to 0 or 1 science courses per semester and slowly scale back up. Even if it takes you an extra year or 2/3, its worth it (especially now that grade replacement is gone). Look over all your old exams, pick out which questions you got wrong, why you got them wrong, and how you're going to change your study strategy to not get them wrong in the future. These steps are key to identifying and addressing the issues you have. Sounds like your a procrastinator-- if it were me, I would take each major benchmark (ex. bio exam), create intermediate goals (by X date I will have read X chapter, by X date I will have taken and analyzed a practice exam, etc), and create penalties for every goal you miss (burpees have worked phenomenally for me). Could work it as a rewards system, but tbh I've found punishment more effective. All of this is just to give you an example of the things you should be thinking about, you now have to run your own diagnostics and put in the hard miles.

After (and only after) you've identified and addressed your issues (aka semester gpa > 3.5), time to start to figure out next steps (note: this may be during undergraduate or post-bacc, depends how long it takes you). The 3 adcoms I've talked to told me that to be considered adequate for med school, you need 3 years of good academic performance (I understood this as 3.5 minimum). Once you've done that, you're looking at MCAT (I'd guess you'd need 510+ alongside the 3.0-3.3 ugpa), potentially more post-bacc, or an SMP with a strong linkage (because IMO the ones without are just trying to beat you up and take your lunch money). But all of this is AFTER you figure out what is going on, do that first paragraph, and get some success.

My basis: I have been in those shoes and am applying now (3.0, 516, SMP at 3.5+, extensive shadowing and volunteer/professional experience). I can barely get DO schools to look at me after multiple cycles (have been told its for quantitative reasons). It's not impossible to get in from your position--but it requires immediate and intensive action before you dig a deeper hole for yourself (aka me).

Sorry if this seemed ranty/rambley/mean, just wish someone had done this to me a few years back...
Any IAs?
Did you do your SMP at a medical school?

Have a DO LOR? Shadowed a DO?

In your case, I suspect a bad LOR.
 

JDsfloatingheadDr

2+ Year Member
Jan 26, 2016
125
89
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
Finished my freshman year with a sub 1.0 GPA. Retook all of my classes, showed significant and sustained improvement and rocked the mcat. Have had a few DO interviews this cycle. If this is something you really want to do, it can be done.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

Magus5454

MS3 C/O 2022
5+ Year Member
Feb 23, 2015
2,117
1,817
Arkansas
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
There are plenty of threads on similar topics-- their situations might be slightly different, but the overall advice is the same. Also, please note that AACOM is no longer doing grade replacement, so the setting has changed a bit since the 2000s.

Here's the thing: you can sit here and download a gpa calculator and try to figure out what your gpa might be and how many credits of 4.0 you need to hit 3.X and what classes you can fit in and how many years before you can apply and etc. etc. etc. I have been in that exact same situation (finished my sophomore year with a 2.5) and have spent and ungodly amount of time doing that. But the major thing you need to figure out is HOW you are going to do better. Plenty of people say "I know I can do better" when they haven't gotten an A since high school. They end up using their same study habits (either partying all the time or studying ineffectively all the time) and continuing to perform at a low standard. If it's problems at home, maybe take some time off. If you're repeatedly underperforming in science classes, cut your courseload to 0 or 1 science courses per semester and slowly scale back up. Even if it takes you an extra year or 2/3, its worth it (especially now that grade replacement is gone). Look over all your old exams, pick out which questions you got wrong, why you got them wrong, and how you're going to change your study strategy to not get them wrong in the future. These steps are key to identifying and addressing the issues you have. Sounds like your a procrastinator-- if it were me, I would take each major benchmark (ex. bio exam), create intermediate goals (by X date I will have read X chapter, by X date I will have taken and analyzed a practice exam, etc), and create penalties for every goal you miss (burpees have worked phenomenally for me). Could work it as a rewards system, but tbh I've found punishment more effective. All of this is just to give you an example of the things you should be thinking about, you now have to run your own diagnostics and put in the hard miles.

After (and only after) you've identified and addressed your issues (aka semester gpa > 3.5), time to start to figure out next steps (note: this may be during undergraduate or post-bacc, depends how long it takes you). The 3 adcoms I've talked to told me that to be considered adequate for med school, you need 3 years of good academic performance (I understood this as 3.5 minimum). Once you've done that, you're looking at MCAT (I'd guess you'd need 510+ alongside the 3.0-3.3 ugpa), potentially more post-bacc, or an SMP with a strong linkage (because IMO the ones without are just trying to beat you up and take your lunch money). But all of this is AFTER you figure out what is going on, do that first paragraph, and get some success.

My basis: I have been in those shoes and am applying now (3.0, 516, SMP at 3.5+, extensive shadowing and volunteer/professional experience). I can barely get DO schools to look at me after multiple cycles (have been told its for quantitative reasons). It's not impossible to get in from your position--but it requires immediate and intensive action before you dig a deeper hole for yourself (aka me).

Sorry if this seemed ranty/rambley/mean, just wish someone had done this to me a few years back...
I agree with @Goro here. I had similar stats, no SMP and had several MD IIs and over 10 DO IIs.
 

JSReed

7+ Year Member
Aug 11, 2011
272
250
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student (Accepted)
Any IAs?
Did you do your SMP at a medical school?

Have a DO LOR? Shadowed a DO?

In your case, I suspect a bad LOR.


No IAs, SMP at a top 50 med school, LOR from a DO (worked with him for a year, he told me the lor is excellent), and have shadowed a DO. Through a personal connection, managed to get a quick call with an admissions rep from one of my state MD schools (have known him since I was 8, I hope he'd tel lthe truth). Was told that the issue was low gpa. Recently got 2 DO IIs (thank you lord), lets see if I can get it over the line.

Regardless, the point wasn't to shine a light on me, so much as to highlight that anyone who is having serious GPA issues needs to actually identify their deficits, change their study strategies, and get results before trying to plan/calculate/hypothesize when they're going to get in to med school.
 
Last edited:
Sep 26, 2017
17
9
Honestly, it will be very very difficult but not impossible. I graduated undergrad with a 2.9 science gpa and 3.1 gpa. I did have to take two years off and did a one year masters where I graduated #1 in my class with a 4.0 gpa. I believe that was the only reason I got accepted. It is possible to get in but you would likely have to do either a post-bac/masters and kill it to show admissions you are capable. Even when I did that I was waitlisted and got lucky enough to get in. I know the feeling, best of luck.

What master's did you complete?
 
Jan 15, 2018
48
37
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
What master's did you complete?
I did the one at Midwestern University. Do some research, there are plenty of programs that guarantee an interview if you meet a certain GPA/MCAT in the Master's program. Some even guarantee admission (I believe Rosalind Franklin does this).
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

chemdoctor

2+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2016
1,818
996
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
No IAs, SMP at a top 50 med school, LOR from a DO (worked with him for a year, he told me the lor is excellent), and have shadowed a DO. Through a personal connection, managed to get a quick call with an admissions rep from one of my state MD schools (have known him since I was 8, I hope he'd tel lthe truth). Was told that the issue was low gpa. Recently got 2 DO IIs (thank you lord), lets see if I can get it over the line.

Regardless, the point wasn't to shine a light on me, so much as to highlight that anyone who is having serious GPA issues needs to actually identify their deficits, change their study strategies, and get results before trying to plan/calculate/hypothesize when they're going to get in to med school.

Do you believe that shadowing a DO was necessary? I'm finding it difficult to fit DO shadowing into my schedule. have tons of MD tho.
 

JSReed

7+ Year Member
Aug 11, 2011
272
250
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student (Accepted)
Do you believe that shadowing a DO was necessary? I'm finding it difficult to fit DO shadowing into my schedule. have tons of MD tho.
I'd approximate they're required at about 30%, strongly recommended (written or otherwise) at another 30-40%. So I'd pretty strongly recommend.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Magus5454

MS3 C/O 2022
5+ Year Member
Feb 23, 2015
2,117
1,817
Arkansas
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
I'd approximate they're required at about 30%, strongly recommended (written or otherwise) at another 30-40%. So I'd pretty strongly recommend.
I wouldnt say DO shadowing is that required. I know one expressly required at least 16-20 hours.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

chemdoctor

2+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2016
1,818
996
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
Sorry about hijacking the thread.

OP follow the advice of @Goro and read his guide. It’s going to take a lot of hard work
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
About the Ads
This thread is more than 2 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.