mmikey

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I know I've explained what Osteopathic Medicine is to my parents on at least twelve different occasions, last night too the case. My mom, now apparently learned on her medical education requirements, asks me on the phone last night,
"Now as a uh, Dee Oh, can you do surgery and stuff? Give medicine?". To which I replied, "No unfortunately not; I can't do anything invasive or give anything stronger than advil". She sighed and said that's okay. I restarted telling her the history of Osteopathy, where it stands today, and that I can be a neurosurgeon like on Gray's Anatomy if I wanted to be. Yes, I had to reference TV shows to make her understand residencies, etc.

Anyone else have problems like these? Do our parents really think we'll settle for being anything less than full-fledged doctors?
 

Badgers326

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I know I've explained what Osteopathic Medicine is to my parents on at least twelve different occasions, last night too the case. My mom, now apparently learned on her medical education requirements, asks me on the phone last night,
"Now as a uh, Dee Oh, can you do surgery and stuff? Give medicine?". To which I replied, "No unfortunately not; I can't do anything invasive or give anything stronger than advil". She sighed and said that's okay. I restarted telling her the history of Osteopathy, where it stands today, and that I can be a neurosurgeon like on Gray's Anatomy if I wanted to be. Yes, I had to reference TV shows to make her understand residencies, etc.

Anyone else have problems like these? Do our parents really think we'll settle for being anything less than full-fledged doctors?
I am lucky that I think my mom understands osteopathic medicine, but she wasn't quite sure about it in the beginning (even though she made me see one when I was longer). I definitely have stopped explaining it to my extended family member and my friends that don't seem to get it. I have just started saying that I'm going to medical school and if they decide to research the school that I'm going to and have questions then I will start explaining osteopathic medicine.
 

DoctorJDO

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I am lucky that I think my mom understands osteopathic medicine, but she wasn't quite sure about it in the beginning (even though she made me see one when I was longer). I definitely have stopped explaining it to my extended family member and my friends that don't seem to get it. I have just started saying that I'm going to medical school and if they decide to research the school that I'm going to and have questions then I will start explaining osteopathic medicine.
+1
I get frustrated trying to explain that pre-med students are not in medical school. I can't even imagine trying to explain MD vs DO. I think we should try to get a popular TV show with a DO to do some of that work for us. The AOA should get on that :laugh:
 

csmittyB

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I get frustrated trying to explain that pre-med students are not in medical school. I can't even imagine trying to explain MD vs DO. I think we should try to get a popular TV show with a DO to do some of that work for us. The AOA should get on that :laugh:
I just hope that it isn't a law and order type show where the DO is the defendant.
 
Jul 16, 2009
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If you have explained DO to her 12 times, why is she still asking such basic questions?

Are you not explaining it thoroughly to her or does she just not listen?
 

DoctorJDO

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If you have explained DO to her 12 times, why is she still asking such basic questions?

Are you not explaining it thoroughly to her or does she just not listen?
If you have never heard of DOs in your ~40+ years of life, it might be confusing. Also, differentiating MD and DO can be difficult. you can imagine all the questions: well why don't they just merge, well why don't MDs just learn OMM if it's so effective, why aren't there more DO schools if they are so great, etc
 

CunningCaregivr

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The DO explanation is difficult any way you deliver it. People usually have not heard of DO schools, and when you say "I will not be an MD, but a different kind of physician", the reaction is skepticism. Family, friends, co-workers (even in a hospital setting where DO students train) rarely know what a DO is. To counter the perceived looks of disappointment, I have also framed it as "I am going to medical school". If someone is curious about the DO topic, then I am happy to lay it on them.

After thorough explanation, my family and friends have asked me about the DO difference multiple times as well... I think they finally get it.

I believe that a AOA/AMA merger is necessary to some degree. There are so many commonalities shared in our profession. Check out what the head of AAMC wrote:



http://journals.lww.com/academicmedi...ucation.9.aspx
 

StarStup

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I used to have to explain it to my mom a lot. I would think she got it and then all of a sudden ask a question like "can you still do surgery?"... The questions finally stopped when she met a DO at the hospital she works at and saw that there is no difference and now I think she finally gets it.

My boyfriends brother calls it voodoo medicine (jokingly I hope!) and I smile and tell him I will be making around $200,000 doing my voodoo medicine and that usually shuts him up :D
 

jinobi

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I thought I had adequately explained my applying to DO schools to my parents over the phone, but they were still surprised when I told them during Thanksgiving break. They were primarily concerned that DOs didn't have equal standing with MDs, but I spent an hour comparing curriculum, hospital rotations, and other info about MD and DO.

Though I think my dad wasn't really comforted until he asked his family physician and was reassured that DOs are basically like MDs.
 

emjayel

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I usually explain it by saying that we are basically the same as MD, except we take an extra course.

My parents were easily okay with me becoming a DO after my MD uncle recommended I go this route. :thumbup:
 
Nov 30, 2010
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I know I've explained what Osteopathic Medicine is to my parents on at least twelve different occasions, last night too the case. My mom, now apparently learned on her medical education requirements, asks me on the phone last night,
"Now as a uh, Dee Oh, can you do surgery and stuff? Give medicine?". To which I replied, "No unfortunately not; I can't do anything invasive or give anything stronger than advil". She sighed and said that's okay. I restarted telling her the history of Osteopathy, where it stands today, and that I can be a neurosurgeon like on Gray's Anatomy if I wanted to be. Yes, I had to reference TV shows to make her understand residencies, etc.

Anyone else have problems like these? Do our parents really think we'll settle for being anything less than full-fledged doctors?
that's a funny story..:smuggrin:
 

Kevin Baker

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At first I tried to explain the DO/MD thing to friends. Now I just tell them I'm going to med school in cali. Most get jealous...

The worst are the pre-med friends, who automatically assume DO is a backup, especially the friends who aren't applying DO as well, and especially especially the friends only applying to top 20 MD programs or the ones too afraid to even apply. So many of them are afraid of not having the MD initial behind their name. One friend is taking two years off to up her ECs , another 1.5 to get a masters (so she can apply after only 1 year), another is retaking the MCAT even though she did well enough (28+) and can still apply DO, and another gave up on being an American-trained doctor and is going back home (abroad) for school, even though she wants to end up here.

None of the DO schools are my first choice but there are plenty of allo schools I'd pass up to go to Western. It's not a backup, but where you think you'll fit in and what school will give you the best career outcome.

As for the family, my Mom can be pretty annoying, using the term medical school to refer to only allo schools, even though she knows all about DOs and she even set me up with the person I shadowed, and my Dr. Dad oft mentions how his hospital just promoted a DO to a big position, like that should be a miracle...

Life is good :)
 

Postal

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I've explained it to my mom, but since she works at a hospital, she's had a chance to see that there's really no difference. Plus she's one of those mom's that goes and asks all of her friends at work about the stuff I do, so I'm sure someone else should've explain it to her as well.

Funny enough, my mother also only uses the term medical school to refer to allo schools.

I haven't even bothered explaining it to my father. I just tell everyone one else I'm going to medical school.
 

PunkmedGirl

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My mom is a nurse so I didn't have to explain anything to her, but my brother ( and his annoying ass know-it-all father) was a different story. They made a comment that I won't be considered a doctor if I go to DO school to which I replied, "You don't have to call me a doctor because I attended a DO school, but my bank account will prove I'm one.":cool:
 
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AGLAIA

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My ILs totally understood because they had DOs when my husband was younger, and my dad understood quickly. However, I didn't even mention it to my mother because if we speak about me going to school, she just talks about how many physicians she has "fired" because they won't do what she wants and how every woman doctor is horrid. I can't imagine how the convo would go if I told her I was accepted DO...I figure she can just shove off. :annoyed:
 

elftown

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What really solidifies the understanding is when someone is treated by a DO. My sister came home from the hospital after having her baby and told me that her anesthesiologist was a DO. It doesn't get more clear than that.
 

st2205

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What really solidifies the understanding is when someone is treated by a DO. My sister came home from the hospital after having her baby and told me that her anesthesiologist was a DO. It doesn't get more clear than that.
This. You will never convince them to the degree that they believe you're not either 1) misinformed or 2) trying to justify what you're doing and talk it up to impress them/make them proud. Just know that there's absolutely nothing you can do on your own, nothing you can show them and nothing you can tell them, that will change their minds or calm their fears. You're going to have to wait until they read about it in Cosmo, see it on Dr. Phil, or hear about how the person doing Oprah's colonic spoke highly of DOs.
 

painmd87

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Grandfather: "What's this OD thing and why haven't I ever heard of it?"
Me: explains equal practice rights, prescription rights, holistic approach, basically the AOA guidebook.
Uncle: "So, basically, you mainly use herbal remedies but can't prescribe drugs, right?"
Me: ....................

Unfortunately, DOs are poorly represented in Maryland, so people aren't likely to see one very often. The push for equality also has the (unintended?) consequence that most patients will never notice they saw a DO rather than an MD.

I'm lucky that my MD father works with DOs and has a number of DO residents working under him, including the last few chiefs. Saved me that fight....
 

SFO-IST

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At first I tried to explain the DO/MD thing to friends. Now I just tell them I'm going to med school in cali. Most get jealous...

The worst are the pre-med friends, who automatically assume DO is a backup, especially the friends who aren't applying DO as well, and especially especially the friends only applying to top 20 MD programs or the ones too afraid to even apply. So many of them are afraid of not having the MD initial behind their name. One friend is taking two years off to up her ECs , another 1.5 to get a masters (so she can apply after only 1 year), another is retaking the MCAT even though she did well enough (28+) and can still apply DO, and another gave up on being an American-trained doctor and is going back home (abroad) for school, even though she wants to end up here.

None of the DO schools are my first choice but there are plenty of allo schools I'd pass up to go to Western. It's not a backup, but where you think you'll fit in and what school will give you the best career outcome.

As for the family, my Mom can be pretty annoying, using the term medical school to refer to only allo schools, even though she knows all about DOs and she even set me up with the person I shadowed, and my Dr. Dad oft mentions how his hospital just promoted a DO to a big position, like that should be a miracle...

Life is good :)

I'm in the same boat - actually we'll be classmates next year. When asked, I've been flat out saying that I'm going to DO school. If you think about it, the profession has accepted me into one of their best schools. I can at least return the favor by expanding the public awareness of what DO's are. Not specifying that you're in "Osteopathic" medicine to a layperson is a half-victory at best.
 

PinkStarburst

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Yeah. I basically just tell people that I'll be going to medical school in <insert city>. and that usually doesn't go any further until they ask what schools I will be going to.

My mom, aunt, and grandmother had/have(?) issues about it. My mom and aunt got swayed when I told them that our family friend just graduated from the school I plan on attending and they were like "ooOooh.. He's a DO?" Then I go and tell them that he's doing his peds residency right now and they finally accept it. My aunt, however, took some more time and convincing that I will be a physician. She understands what DO is but still tells me to apply MD because MDs are more well known and I won't need to explain what a DO is all the time. (My extended family is also heavily involved in my life since they all basically raised me and supported me through college).
 

IamaBanana

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It's so bad, even for MD students and pre-meds. It's perpetuated by the lazy, lazy media. I am currently going through Nip/Tuck and the inconsistencies and mistakes about medical education is outrageous. They can't decide if Julia got into med school and dropped out or never got in but always refer to her as "pre-med" and the number of people who say "he failed his MCATS" is driving me up the wall.

And don't even try to talk to a European relative. That system is so weird.
 

dunaa

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I'm in the same boat - actually we'll be classmates next year. When asked, I've been flat out saying that I'm going to DO school. If you think about it, the profession has accepted me into one of their best schools. I can at least return the favor by expanding the public awareness of what DO's are. Not specifying that you're in "Osteopathic" medicine to a layperson is a half-victory at best.
I totally agree with you. If we as "willing" osteopathic doctors aspirants are not willing to take the pain of explaining what we do and tolerate the ignorance of others about our profession by hiding behind the term "medical school", then who will do it? AOA? But who makes up the AOA? I think we are doing our profession a BIG disservice by jumping the gun. I tell EVERYONE who asks that I am going to an "osteopathic medical" school. Even if they do not understand what we do after a tedious explanation, at LEAST they will get to know we exist. They will know there is an equal alternate path out there! By not telling people IMHO is equivalent to writing M.D instead of D.O behind your name once you are a doctor to avoid patients or other ignoramus asking you what they mean. Just put it out there and let people dig for themselves. For most of my friends, I just provided them with websites that do justice our profession (i.e AOA, and those of D.Os in some subspecialties) and if they can't figure it out from there, then I'll be living proof in the next 7yrs or so. It can't possibly be that HARD! Lets walk the talk people...

My 2 cents
 

Postal

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I totally agree with you. If we as "willing" osteopathic doctors aspirants are not willing to take the pain of explaining what we do and tolerate the ignorance of others about our profession by hiding behind the term "medical school", then who will do it? AOA? But who makes up the AOA? I think we are doing our profession a BIG disservice by jumping the gun. I tell EVERYONE who asks that I am going to an "osteopathic medical" school. Even if they do not understand what we do after a tedious explanation, at LEAST they will get to know we exist. They will know there is an equal alternate path out there! By not telling people IMHO is equivalent to writing M.D instead of D.O behind your name once you are a doctor to avoid patients or other ignoramus asking you what they mean. Just put it out there and let people dig for themselves. For most of my friends, I just provided them with websites that do justice our profession (i.e AOA, and those of D.Os in some subspecialties) and if they can't figure it out from there, then I'll be living proof in the next 7yrs or so. It can't possibly be that HARD! Lets walk the talk people...

My 2 cents
You know, I thought about that as I was writing my post. I was like: "We'll complain that no one knows what a D.O. is but don't take the time to inform people". Guilty as charged.
 

MedicineMike

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My dad's side of my family is completely uneducated and from the north. Sometimes I don't even bother telling them about a future in medicine bc they don't even know what that means. I think they just think Doctors are Doctors because they say they are or something....Anyways, so I mentioned it the other day that I had an interview at a DO school and all of my Aunts and grandma say "Every doctor I saw growing up (in ohio) was a DO"...I was completely caught off guard to say the least.

My mom doesnt care. She just wants me to do well in whatever I do!
 

SFO-IST

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I totally agree with you. If we as "willing" osteopathic doctors aspirants are not willing to take the pain of explaining what we do and tolerate the ignorance of others about our profession by hiding behind the term "medical school", then who will do it? AOA? But who makes up the AOA? I think we are doing our profession a BIG disservice by jumping the gun. I tell EVERYONE who asks that I am going to an "osteopathic medical" school. Even if they do not understand what we do after a tedious explanation, at LEAST they will get to know we exist. They will know there is an equal alternate path out there! By not telling people IMHO is equivalent to writing M.D instead of D.O behind your name once you are a doctor to avoid patients or other ignoramus asking you what they mean. Just put it out there and let people dig for themselves. For most of my friends, I just provided them with websites that do justice our profession (i.e AOA, and those of D.Os in some subspecialties) and if they can't figure it out from there, then I'll be living proof in the next 7yrs or so. It can't possibly be that HARD! Lets walk the talk people...

My 2 cents
Exactly. The best school that accepted me is an awesome DO school. :love: I am going to an Osteopathic Medical school, and I'm pretty friggin' proud of it. If people have questions about the historical relevance of Osteopathic vs. Allopathic, I'm happy to indulge them.
 
Oct 6, 2009
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My stepdad applied to DO schools when he was young (unfortunately he didn't get in), so he basically knows everything about it. And he was actually the one who encouraged me to apply to DO schools. I don't think my mum truly knows what a DO is, but one of her friends' brother is a DO. And I just told her I will be a doctor like him. She was just happy that I got into med school..haha :]
 
Nov 26, 2010
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I know I've explained what Osteopathic Medicine is to my parents on at least twelve different occasions, last night too the case. My mom, now apparently learned on her medical education requirements, asks me on the phone last night,
"Now as a uh, Dee Oh, can you do surgery and stuff? Give medicine?". To which I replied, "No unfortunately not; I can't do anything invasive or give anything stronger than advil". She sighed and said that's okay. I restarted telling her the history of Osteopathy, where it stands today, and that I can be a neurosurgeon like on Gray's Anatomy if I wanted to be. Yes, I had to reference TV shows to make her understand residencies, etc.

Anyone else have problems like these? Do our parents really think we'll settle for being anything less than full-fledged doctors?

Yes, my mom is sort of hesitant about the idea of me becoming a DO instead of an MD. She thinks it will be harder for me to find work and that it's not as steady of a job as an MD. She's a nurse, so she's assumed that every doctor she's worked with is an MD, which for the most part might be the case, but not all the time.

I have only just started considering the DO program over MD, so my dad doesn't even know yet. That might lead to many more repetitive statements. It's ashame that we have to almost argue our case on why we chose the DO route, but as long as you stay true to you, you'll be fine. Others will learn to respect that you have a mind of your own and don't need others to choose your career for you. At the end of the day, whether we're an MD or DO, we're still physicians trying to save lives!
 
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When I told my mom I was applying to some osteo schools, surprisingly she goes, "Your brother was delivered by a DO. He was great!"

But I also grew up in Missouri and she was a paramedic - so she knows all the hospitals, including the osteo ones in our area (one of which ATSU still works with!).

Everyone I've talked to has been supportive and for the most part either understood, or just not brought up not understanding. Except for my bf's mom, but her lack of understanding had to do with what I wanted to do.

"If you want to do forensic pathology, why don't you just do that?"
"Uhm, because I'd have to be a doctor first...."

I was really starting to consider primary care, but if I'd have to keep defending my degree...maybe for. path. would be the better job. At least my patient wouldn't be asking me if I was a real doctor... :laugh:

j/k...kinda.
 

kuanileqa

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Folks, it really doesn't matter what the family thinks! If you want to do it, than do it. If you don't want to do it, do something else. Geesh, your parents should just be happy you are going to professional school and not selling drugs/your body on the street.
 

dunaa

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When I told my mom I was applying to some osteo schools, surprisingly she goes, "Your brother was delivered by a DO. He was great!"

But I also grew up in Missouri and she was a paramedic - so she knows all the hospitals, including the osteo ones in our area (one of which ATSU still works with!).

Everyone I've talked to has been supportive and for the most part either understood, or just not brought up not understanding. Except for my bf's mom, but her lack of understanding had to do with what I wanted to do.

"If you want to do forensic pathology, why don't you just do that?"
"Uhm, because I'd have to be a doctor first...."

I was really starting to consider primary care, but if I'd have to keep defending my degree...maybe for. path. would be the better job. At least my patient wouldn't be asking me if I was a real doctor... :laugh:

j/k...kinda.
That cracked me up!:laugh:
 
Oct 12, 2010
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Geez....time to cut the umbilical cord people....wow
Dude... seriously? I guess some of us are lucky enough to have people in our lives who care about what we do with ourselves after all this pre-reqs and application rings of fire we have to jump through to even just get into medical school. There was once upon a time when I didn't know what a DO was... when I didn't think they were equivalent to an MD... when I thought I would be "settling" after all my hard work. But I did my research, talked to other DOs, ignored my MD psychiatrist uncle who wouldn't even touch a cadaver in med school, and was convinced to the contrary. I think it's good we're talking to our family members about what our degree actually means. It gives DOs a good name in the world of medicine.
 

StarStup

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Geez....time to cut the umbilical cord people....wow
I don't think anyone on this thread is talking about reconsidering DO based on what their family thinks. We're just having a discussion about how we talk about our career choices with family members. It doesn't have anything to do with umbilical cords...just a discussion man! :D
 

willen101383

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I don't think anyone on this thread is talking about reconsidering DO based on what their family thinks. We're just having a discussion about how we talk about our career choices with family members. It doesn't have anything to do with umbilical cords...just a discussion man! :D
This is a recurring theme on SDN on a weekly(daily) basis...and thus annoys the hell out of me. While this thread might not directly be about someone not going to a DO school because of a parents wacko bias.....its still crazy to read about the control some parents exert over their 20+ year old kids. Once you are old enough to be at the cusp of an undergraduate degree; your parents are their for advice, not control.

Educate your parents, but if you want to go to a DO school they need to learn to put their issues to bed and respect the fact that their progeny is going to be a physician.
 

willen101383

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Dude... seriously? I guess some of us are lucky enough to have people in our lives who care about what we do with ourselves after all this pre-reqs and application rings of fire we have to jump through to even just get into medical school. There was once upon a time when I didn't know what a DO was... when I didn't think they were equivalent to an MD... when I thought I would be "settling" after all my hard work. But I did my research, talked to other DOs, ignored my MD psychiatrist uncle who wouldn't even touch a cadaver in med school, and was convinced to the contrary. I think it's good we're talking to our family members about what our degree actually means. It gives DOs a good name in the world of medicine.
I wasnt referring to educating your parents about the DO route.....but about the control certain peoples parents have over their life decisions at an age when parents typically trust their kids to make good decisions and stay out of matters.

I was lucky enough to have parents who supported me on my path to medical school...one that has been a lot longer than most posters here. My father is a MD who never once said anything but great things about my choice to become a DO; and always speaks very highly of the DO colleagues he has.
 

sideways

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Dude... seriously? I guess some of us are lucky enough to have people in our lives who care about what we do with ourselves after all this pre-reqs and application rings of fire we have to jump through to even just get into medical school. There was once upon a time when I didn't know what a DO was... when I didn't think they were equivalent to an MD... when I thought I would be "settling" after all my hard work. But I did my research, talked to other DOs, ignored my MD psychiatrist uncle who wouldn't even touch a cadaver in med school, and was convinced to the contrary. I think it's good we're talking to our family members about what our degree actually means. It gives DOs a good name in the world of medicine.
And yet they don't care enough to spend 10 minutes with Google to investigate it for themselves? They'd rather spout off completely ignorant bull**** to their loved ones. Based, by definition, in no facts whatsoever?

Sounds like a beautiful arrangement. :love:
 

Postal

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I wasnt referring to educating your parents about the DO route.....but about the control certain peoples parents have over their life decisions at an age when parents typically trust their kids to make good decisions and stay out of matters.

I was lucky enough to have parents who supported me on my path to medical school...one that has been a lot longer than most posters here. My father is a MD who never once said anything but great things about my choice to become a DO; and always speaks very highly of the DO colleagues he has.
Personally, I agree that by college-age, parents should let their kids do their own thing and people are old enough to make their own decisions. But you have to consider, that in other cultures, parental or familial approval is very important.
So try not to jump on people who worry about their family's perceptions of their chosen career.
 

willen101383

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Personally, I agree that by college-age, parents should let their kids do their own thing and people are old enough to make their own decisions. But you have to consider, that in other cultures, parental or familial approval is very important.
So try not to jump on people who worry about their family's perceptions of their chosen career.
Yeah. I still really dont get it. Maybe im a little narrow minded on the subject...who knows. I personally know of a guy who took the MCAT something like 5 times and was rejected 3 times before finally "settling" on a DO school (because his non American parents didnt accept DO). He had good stats and is a nice guy, but he allowed his parents MISCONCEPTIONS to control his REALITY.

Its unfortunate.
 

Phlame217

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My parents still don't understand the full idea of a DO, yet my grandparents do lol.

over the break, my wife was having some severe shoulder pain so I did some OMT to help and my dad made the comment "I thought you were in medical school, not chiropractor school." This is after explaining everything to him for about once a month over the past year and a half.

My mom acts like she understands, but she obviously doesnt.

And then my Grandparents.
Both of them have Type II diabetes and their PCP threw them onto a slew of meds and they were having alot of issues. They are both rather fit, both ride bikes and ride about 10 miles day no matter the weather. They sought a new doctor and followed my recommendation for a DO that I shadowed and have experienced the difference. He educated them on glycemic index and diet and they both completely control the diabetes via diet and my grandfather has recurring sciatica due to entrapment and the DO has done various OMT techniques to aid. Rarely do meds have to be prescribed to help with inflammation and pain.
 

lftbndlbrnchblk

7+ Year Member
Jul 27, 2010
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I don't know where you guys live or grew up, but in Arizona, Midwestern is in a nice suburb of Phoenix (capital) and U of A (the MD school) is in... Tucson. Everyone knows Midwestern is a good medical school here and they all know they ain't graduating MDs. Basically, people around here know about DOs and know that they shouldn't care one way or another when they see those two letters after someone's name. I'm familiar with anesth, rads, oncos, surgeons of various kinds, ER docs (boy, are they a lot), and of course, primary docs - all DOs. And they are all at our top hospitals and you'll find many heading up the departments there, just do a search if you care. There's no escaping it in sunny Arizona. Maybe your parents should visit?
 

willen101383

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Jul 22, 2004
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I don't know where you guys live or grew up, but in Arizona, Midwestern is in a nice suburb of Phoenix (capital) and U of A (the MD school) is in... Tucson. Everyone knows Midwestern is a good medical school here and they all know they ain't graduating MDs. Basically, people around here know about DOs and know that they shouldn't care one way or another when they see those two letters after someone's name. I'm familiar with anesth, rads, oncos, surgeons of various kinds, ER docs (boy, are they a lot), and of course, primary docs - all DOs. And they are all at our top hospitals and you'll find many heading up the departments there, just do a search if you care. There's no escaping it in sunny Arizona. Maybe your parents should visit?
Same situation here in Philly. PCOM trains physicians right alongside Penn/Jeff/Drexel/Temple, and does a fine job with it.
 
Jul 27, 2010
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Same situation here in Philly. PCOM trains physicians right alongside Penn/Jeff/Drexel/Temple, and does a fine job with it.
The DO I talked to where I work went to PCOM, she said the same thing.

Where you are in the country definitely does matter. But it would be nice if people wouldn't make rude comments out of their ignorance. Like a rephrasing of Phlame's pop's chiro comment.
 

prone2xl

10+ Year Member
Jan 24, 2008
198
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It's so bad, even for MD students and pre-meds. It's perpetuated by the lazy, lazy media. I am currently going through Nip/Tuck and the inconsistencies and mistakes about medical education is outrageous. They can't decide if Julia got into med school and dropped out or never got in but always refer to her as "pre-med" and the number of people who say "he failed his MCATS" is driving me up the wall.

And don't even try to talk to a European relative. That system is so weird.
This cracked me up!!! LOL I love Nip/Tuck and it's so funny how we never knew what was up with Julia and her med school situation.
 

JW08

7+ Year Member
May 20, 2009
72
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+1
I get frustrated trying to explain that pre-med students are not in medical school. I can't even imagine trying to explain MD vs DO. I think we should try to get a popular TV show with a DO to do some of that work for us. The AOA should get on that :laugh:
+1
But the problem is that AOA is probably the worst organization when it comes to PR. over 100 in existence, and people still dont know much about them. Even the hot-dog vendor in denver downtown has better PR. (he was on Anthony Bourdain show)
 
Jun 12, 2009
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I have the same problem as OP but opposite result. My hippie step-mom is THRILLED I want to be a "D.O." because she thinks it means I will be practicing acupuncture, hellerwork, magnetism and every other new therapy she learns about at the vitamin store!

Regardless, I'm very thankful for the support and I am try to gradually shed light on what I will actually be learning.
 

Westonski

5+ Year Member
Jul 22, 2010
57
1
Pennsylvania
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I have the same problem as OP but opposite result. My hippie step-mom is THRILLED I want to be a "D.O." because she thinks it means I will be practicing acupuncture, hellerwork, magnetism and every other new therapy she learns about at the vitamin store!

Regardless, I'm very thankful for the support and I am try to gradually shed light on what I will actually be learning.

LOL this is just too much.

I have a similar situation with my girlfriend's dad. He told me I should go DO because he prefers them over MD's. He followed with some jargon about modern medicine being terrible for the body and that natural/herbal remedies are the best route to health in virtually every scenario.

I smiled.
 

UBCvan

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Mar 3, 2007
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i didn't read through all the comments but here's what I tell anyone:

first of all I don't tell anyone I'm got into osteopathic medical schools...why should I...why would I...that alone will raise questions...if they somehow know I've got into DO schools (like parents and some friends) I'll tell em it's exactly same as MD plus we get extra training in OMM, so in fact we get more training. am I lying? NO. am I deceiving them? NO. do I lack self esteem? NO. am I telling the whole truth? YES.

WHY AM I DOING THIS AND WHY DO I THINK EVERYONE SHOULD SAY THIS--> at first when anyone asked me what is DO, I used to start off with explaining OMM. THIS IS POISON. because everyone will think that's the focus of your degree and you do a little bit of MD stuff too.

We should start off by saying it is same as MD so everyone will know you're a complete doc right away. then talk about the extra training.

just my thoughts.:xf:
 
Aug 31, 2010
44
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Maybe its because I'm female but when i tell people I'm going to medical school they say "oh, so you're going to be a nurse?!" Obviously this is not everyone (and thankfully not my family), but it seems to happen pretty often. Kind of irritating, but at this point it has become somewhat humorous
 

Prncssbuttercup

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Jul 15, 2010
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I am in MN, we only have MD schools, the closest DO is DMU, and most people don't know it exists. However, when my family asked me about it, I explained it this way: ALL the abilities of an MD/"traditional doctor"/allopathic, PLUS ADDITIONAL training in methods similar to, but not the same as, chiropractic adjustments. My dad and brother said "can you still prescribe medications, and work on your own"? I said yes, and they said sounds great, when do you start? I think they get it and they support it regardless.