Fat doctor

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brightness

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Ok, I'm not really obese, but I am significantly overweight, and I want to be a doctor- I am still in my undergrad, so I'm just thinking these issues over. I've always had a lot of difficulty with my weight and even though I exercise, my eating is not what it should be. I have the potential to change, but I have always had difficulties in this area and it seems unlikely that they'll vanish anytime soon.
I feel like...as a doctor who is fat, I would be a farce. How can I give people health advice when I can't even stop stuffing my face and being a lard ass? I don't want to feel this way about myself, so I try to eat healthy and exercise, but I am far from perfect habits or a perfect body. What do you think about fat physicians and medical personnel? Is it completely unacceptable? Will people look down on me? Should overweight people be doctors? Would you see an overweight doctor?
I added a picture so you can see what I look like. I'm in white! I am 5'3 and I weigh 180, and this might seem like a REALLY DUMB post, but I guess I'm just wondering what you think. Feel free to be ruthless.

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I think that you can always take your life experiences/habits/struggles and use them to your advantage as a doctor. I do agree that it may be tough lecturing to your patients about excercise and diet if you yourself can't follow your own advice. Since you are in undergrad right now, you could start following the advice you will be giving now and see how it goes. You will also have a lot to offer your patients who have struggled with their weight because you will know what it is like. For instance, it is easy, as a nonsmoker, to tell patients 'you need to stop smoking' but if I had been a smoker and had managed to quit I think I would have more to offer than because I would know what they are going through. Also, I read some article in Oprah or something about a physician who was EXTREMELY overweight (350+) and who eventually lost a lot of weight and now works with obese youth and has done a lot to help people. I am not saying you are obese or that you need to do that kind of work but that is just an example of how our personal struggles can help us be better physicians.
 
brightness said:
Ok, I'm not really obese, but I am significantly overweight, and I want to be a doctor- I am still in my undergrad, so I'm just thinking these issues over. I've always had a lot of difficulty with my weight and even though I exercise, my eating is not what it should be. I have the potential to change, but I have always had difficulties in this area and it seems unlikely that they'll vanish anytime soon.
I feel like...as a doctor who is fat, I would be a farce. How can I give people health advice when I can't even stop stuffing my face and being a lard ass? I don't want to feel this way about myself, so I try to eat healthy and exercise, but I am far from perfect habits or a perfect body. What do you think about fat physicians and medical personnel? Is it completely unacceptable? Will people look down on me? Should overweight people be doctors? Would you see an overweight doctor?
I added a picture so you can see what I look like. I'm in white! I am 5'3 and I weigh 180, and this might seem like a REALLY DUMB post, but I guess I'm just wondering what you think. Feel free to be ruthless.

STOP DRINKING BEER ASAP!! Get to the gym, drink zero calori soda and sugar free redbull. Drink Bacardi Rum (I hear that is low calorie), go to the gm, even if it is only for 1/2 hour a day!
 
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Oh gosh. How funny, in a bad way, that I posted a beer drinking photo. I'm not a big drinker, and I rarely go out and party. BUT I will try to heed your advice in the future, beer is a terrible choice. Its cheap, though.
And yes, the gym. You are right, really. I have a lot of time to get fit before becoming a doctor, and I'm hoping to make it my summer project to get healthy again.
 
If I'm dying, I don't care if my doctor is "Tubby" or "Twiggy." What about docs who smoke, who drink too much, who have messed up personal lives, etc? It's more important to me that my doctor be qualified to take care of me; the rest is just window-dressing.

As a side note, you guys have patients who actually listen to you? :laugh:
 
The funny, sort of ironic thing about this thread is that if a guy was posting this it would not matter. DO you know how many fat male doctors there are out there? How many of your doctors do not have that male beer belly?

And a lot of woment that start out med school thin become fat in the process because of the time dedicated to studying and such they forget about eating healthy and exercising.


To answer your question more directly - I think what ever your dream is you should follow it and not let anything get in your way even a "lard ass". Maybe you should work on your selfesteem along with going to the gym...

maybe if you felt better about yourself you would not feel the need to shove your face. The reason I say this is from personal experience. I am an emotional eater so as long as I keep my spirits up I can control what I eat.

If you want a good diet plan PM me. I have been loosing weight for the past few months (20 lbs) and I did it by changing the way I eat but not really what I eat.
 
Being fit or healthy looking is not a requirement for being a doctor, but you should strive to give an appearance of good health so being extremely overweight or mobidly obese is probably not a good way to attract patients. But most people can understand an extra pound or two, especially given your extremely busy lifestyle.
 
To be totally honest, I think that as long as you have good self-esteem and are confident, patients will respond favorably to you as a physician (assuming skill and bedside manner aren't problems of course!). While this is probably not the best picture of you, I think you are probably actually pretty in real life. However, at 5'3"/180lbs you probably should lose some weight and excercise for health reasons, as your BMI puts you just in the obese category. If lowering your weight helps deal with any insecurities you have, then go try and lose some weight. Here's the BMI calculator I used from the CDC website:

http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/bmi/adult_BMI/english_bmi_calculator/bmi_calculator.htm

-X
 
brightness said:
Ok, I'm not really obese, but I am significantly overweight, and I want to be a doctor- I am still in my undergrad, so I'm just thinking these issues over. I've always had a lot of difficulty with my weight and even though I exercise, my eating is not what it should be. I have the potential to change, but I have always had difficulties in this area and it seems unlikely that they'll vanish anytime soon.
I feel like...as a doctor who is fat, I would be a farce. How can I give people health advice when I can't even stop stuffing my face and being a lard ass? I don't want to feel this way about myself, so I try to eat healthy and exercise, but I am far from perfect habits or a perfect body. What do you think about fat physicians and medical personnel? Is it completely unacceptable? Will people look down on me? Should overweight people be doctors? Would you see an overweight doctor?
I added a picture so you can see what I look like. I'm in white! I am 5'3 and I weigh 180, and this might seem like a REALLY DUMB post, but I guess I'm just wondering what you think. Feel free to be ruthless.

Possibly it's just chance, but I've been to three PC doc's in the last 10 years and they have all been lard-asses. I mean triple-chin fat. So you definitely shouldn't think that being a little heavy is going to hurt you in the medical field. However, when I see an obese doc I have the same feeling as when I see a doc or nurse smoking...wtf? Eh, whatever...I guess something has gotta kill ya...
 
I couldn't find the citation just now, but JAMA 3/?/2004 had an article on the effect of physician obesity on their nutrition and exercise counseling, and found some (but, as I recall, not a whole lot) of negative correlation between doc BMI and counseling effectiveness. Personally, I think patients recognize that physicians are people too.
 
Great thread, very interesting topic! I think I would see an overweight physician if they were competent and made me feel comfortable/confident in their abilities. I also agree with the other poster who mentioned that your personal experiences will make you a better advisor to your patients, as you can empathize with their struggle.

I personally was overweight as an adolescent, and lost 30 lbs in high school. I think the big thing in trying to lose weight is to stay active - keep moving! Currently, to maintain my weight I live by the following rules: cut back on the "bad" carbs (i.e. high glycemic index), eat LOTS of fruits and vegetables (salads are great), and exercise EVERYday, even for 1/2 hour, but stick to it! Good luck with everything! ;)
 
I'v seen plenty of overweight docs in a range of specialties.This should not stop you from pursuing medicine as a career.If you feel uncomfortable lecturing people on the need to lose weight there are many others things to do as a physician.Hopefully by the time you pick a specialty you will have appreciated the severe effects of obesity and made some lifestyle changes of your own.
 
I know that according to the BMI I am obese, but I've always been "overweight" according to that wonky thing- even when I was bulimic and ran 30+ miles a week and had a body fat % of 17%. I still weighed 140 lbs. This morning I went and had my body fat tested and found out that I am 34% body fat. This IS too high, but in most scales it falls in the overweight category, not obese. Either way, I think that body fat % is going to be a better way for me to measure my success than the BMI...and, either way, I have a lot of work to do. I want to get into the 20-25% body fat range, which is probably about 150-155? Its not really important to me to be skinny, or look hot in a swimsuit, probably since I never have...I just want to be healthy and happy. :) I am all red and drunk in that picture, too. Lol.


xanthines said:
To be totally honest, I think that as long as you have good self-esteem and are confident, patients will respond favorably to you as a physician (assuming skill and bedside manner aren't problems of course!). While this is probably not the best picture of you, I think you are probably actually pretty in real life. However, at 5'3"/180lbs you probably should lose some weight and excercise for health reasons, as your BMI puts you just in the obese category. If lowering your weight helps deal with any insecurities you have, then go try and lose some weight. Here's the BMI calculator I used from the CDC website:

http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/bmi/adult_BMI/english_bmi_calculator/bmi_calculator.htm

-X
 
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So here's a question...practically speaking, do you think that Medical School Admissions Committees will hold it against an applicant if they are overweight? I've put on some pounds over the past year (which has been pretty much the worst year in my entire life -- long story.) I've slowly gotten myself back on track and am starting to lose the weight (slowly and healthily through sensible diet and exercise) but I'll probably still be slightly overweight at the time of interviews.

I'm not self-conscious about this except in the context of this message board. When I see threads with other premeds/med students/doctors saying that obesity is one of the biggest problems facing the heathcare system today (with little retort) I can't help but wonder if I might face some bias because of my weight. It's not like I get to pull out pictures of myself throughout the years -- the impression I am going to make is what I look like now.

Any opinions?
 
brightness said:
Ok, I'm not really obese, but I am significantly overweight, and I want to be a doctor- I am still in my undergrad, so I'm just thinking these issues over. I've always had a lot of difficulty with my weight and even though I exercise, my eating is not what it should be. I have the potential to change, but I have always had difficulties in this area and it seems unlikely that they'll vanish anytime soon.
I feel like...as a doctor who is fat, I would be a farce. How can I give people health advice when I can't even stop stuffing my face and being a lard ass? I don't want to feel this way about myself, so I try to eat healthy and exercise, but I am far from perfect habits or a perfect body. What do you think about fat physicians and medical personnel? Is it completely unacceptable? Will people look down on me? Should overweight people be doctors? Would you see an overweight doctor?
I added a picture so you can see what I look like. I'm in white! I am 5'3 and I weigh 180, and this might seem like a REALLY DUMB post, but I guess I'm just wondering what you think. Feel free to be ruthless.




HI, first of all, don't call yourself a Lard ass! In your picture, you look like a very pretty girl and you seem like a very nice person, SO BE NICE TO YOURSELF!!! :) Have some faith in yourself, and I am certain you can lose some weight and become healthier if you want to. However, I really don't think you should give up on your goal because you are heavy. There are other posts that I have read on here where people have said that there are plenty of overweight medical students in there class. As far as patients are concerned, my dad is an overwieght guy and he actually tells me that he likes the overweight doctors much better because he feels like "they understand him better" than the slim doctors and give him better health recommendations because of it. :D I have also personally seen plenty of overweight doctors and tons of overweight nurses.
 
best way to lose weight= exercise + decreased calorie density (e.g. 100 g apple instead of 100g cake)
 
It sounds like your attitude is pragmatic and you're not being too self-judgemental, which is good. Lots of people start to get really kind of vicious with the way they talk about themselves, channeling their desire to change things into nasty wording, as though a person could be his/her own Marine drill instructor. So be careful of that; a couple people have already called you on the use of "lard-ass," and they're right to, but I think you were just kidding.

Yes, I find it somewhat odd when my family practice guy tells me to lose a few pounds; I'm 5'8 and 165, but he's like 5'10 and 205 or something. However, I know he's right, and he knows he should be following that advice too. Considering the increase of larger people in the population, some patients might actually find it comforting if their provider is "human too," as someone said. Even after you get yourself to your target shape, you'll still be someone who understands the struggle.

...and remember too that a lot of people who are overweight have some sort of metabolic error going on, such that they're actually a little malnourished despite the quantity of food they take in. So I say do the exericise and diet thing, but do it in consultation with some pros. Get an endocrinologist to do some blood work. Just tell 'em you're a former bulimic who wants to lose n pounds over a period of t months. You should find out all you can about your metabolism now, because you're setting out to change it.

Getting yourself to someplace with not just exercise facilities but also a nutritionist and dare I say it, a smidge of counseling could be good. You say you're a former bulimic, so naturally one jumps right to "aha; this person's brain deals with food in a different way." I doubt it's really so simple as that, and I bet you're fine now, but hey, you may as well use all the tools you can, while you're still a pre-med and get to (sort of) have a life. If nothing else, you'd be able to jump into the physical training thing knowing it is finally totally a physical thing, right?

And if you can work out some healthy habits now, you'll be way ahead of your med school classmates who try to survive on Pringles and Mt. Dew. :)

So yeah, a BMI of 31 or 32 and a % body fat of 34 is up there. But I think you've got the drive and the realism to do something about this, and I think you totally can.
 
brightness said:
I know that according to the BMI I am obese, but I've always been "overweight" according to that wonky thing- even when I was bulimic and ran 30+ miles a week and had a body fat % of 17%. [snip]

this was a big red flag to me! make sure that you get psychological counseling while you're trying to lose weight...or that your PCP at least knows about your past history.

good luck and please be safe! :luck:
 
vesper9 said:
this was a big red flag to me! make sure that you get psychological counseling while you're trying to lose weight...or that your PCP at least knows about your past history.

good luck and please be safe! :luck:

*sigh* I'm always in one direction or the other, I guess. I've always been either "too skinny" (according to relatives...I don't really think 17% is too skinny, but I know my habits were out of whack, so I'll accept it) or too fat. I just want to find balance with my health and my body. And I know that I need counseling and I should probably look into that on campus. I think my history with eating disorderly behavior makes me wary of trying to lose weight. I know that being overweight is not necessarily psychologically or physically healthy, but overall I am still happier than I was when I cried for like, two hours over eating a bowl of oatmeal.
Ok, so counseling. I will look into this. Thank you.
 
Your post was very positive, and even at my target size I will still be very "human"- I've never been one to be really thin. I want to get a full blood profile done and also maybe see a nutritionist for some advice. :)

Febrifuge said:
It sounds like your attitude is pragmatic and you're not being too self-judgemental, which is good. Lots of people start to get really kind of vicious with the way they talk about themselves, channeling their desire to change things into nasty wording, as though a person could be his/her own Marine drill instructor. So be careful of that; a couple people have already called you on the use of "lard-ass," and they're right to, but I think you were just kidding.

Yes, I find it somewhat odd when my family practice guy tells me to lose a few pounds; I'm 5'8 and 165, but he's like 5'10 and 205 or something. However, I know he's right, and he knows he should be following that advice too. Considering the increase of larger people in the population, some patients might actually find it comforting if their provider is "human too," as someone said. Even after you get yourself to your target shape, you'll still be someone who understands the struggle.

...and remember too that a lot of people who are overweight have some sort of metabolic error going on, such that they're actually a little malnourished despite the quantity of food they take in. So I say do the exericise and diet thing, but do it in consultation with some pros. Get an endocrinologist to do some blood work. Just tell 'em you're a former bulimic who wants to lose n pounds over a period of t months. You should find out all you can about your metabolism now, because you're setting out to change it.

Getting yourself to someplace with not just exercise facilities but also a nutritionist and dare I say it, a smidge of counseling could be good. You say you're a former bulimic, so naturally one jumps right to "aha; this person's brain deals with food in a different way." I doubt it's really so simple as that, and I bet you're fine now, but hey, you may as well use all the tools you can, while you're still a pre-med and get to (sort of) have a life. If nothing else, you'd be able to jump into the physical training thing knowing it is finally totally a physical thing, right?

And if you can work out some healthy habits now, you'll be way ahead of your med school classmates who try to survive on Pringles and Mt. Dew. :)

So yeah, a BMI of 31 or 32 and a % body fat of 34 is up there. But I think you've got the drive and the realism to do something about this, and I think you totally can.
 
Thanks for saying I'm perty. I know its a big smelly lie, but its nice! :horns: I think I do need to have more faith and more self esteem....

cbertino said:
HI, first of all, don't call yourself a Lard ass! In your picture, you look like a very pretty girl and you seem like a very nice person, SO BE NICE TO YOURSELF!!! :) Have some faith in yourself, and I am certain you can lose some weight and become healthier if you want to. However, I really don't think you should give up on your goal because you are heavy. There are other posts that I have read on here where people have said that there are plenty of overweight medical students in there class. As far as patients are concerned, my dad is an overwieght guy and he actually tells me that he likes the overweight doctors much better because he feels like "they understand him better" than the slim doctors and give him better health recommendations because of it. :D I have also personally seen plenty of overweight doctors a nd tons of overweight nurses.
 
Hon, you look pretty average to me. Maybe you're technically overweight, but I wouldn't look at you and say "DAMN, she's fat!"

You should see some of the nurses I work with. :scared:
 
I started gaining weight my senior year of high school and nothing I did made a difference. A year after graduating from college I was diagnosed with PCOS, and once I was put on Glucophage and switched to a diabetic diet I started losing about five pounds a month. I was 164 pounds and now I'm down to 136. I know this sounds kind of ridiculous but I'm under five feet tall and petite so my BMI was borderline obese even though I was wearing size 13 jeans.

I don't think I would have ever been able to lose weight without taking Glucophage and learning how to eat in a different way. it's been hard but well worth it. I'd definitely recommend an endocrine evaluation. Lots of luck!
 
mustangsally65 said:
I started gaining weight my senior year of high school and nothing I did made a difference. A year after graduating from college I was diagnosed with PCOS, and once I was put on Glucophage and switched to a diabetic diet I started losing about five pounds a month. I was 164 pounds and now I'm down to 136. I know this sounds kind of ridiculous but I'm under five feet tall and petite so my BMI was borderline obese even though I was wearing size 13 jeans.

I don't think I would have ever been able to lose weight without taking Glucophage and learning how to eat in a different way. it's been hard but well worth it. I'd definitely recommend an endocrine evaluation. Lots of luck!
Your "diabetic diet" consisted of avoiding foods with high glycemic index I assume? This means avoiding sugar and processed carbohydrates, things that EVERYONE should be avoiding. If you eat well and exercise, yes you will lose weight. Duh. This is the only thing you need to know. Don't go waste your money on bloodwork and glucophage.
 
Most doctors I know are fat, so it makes no difference. And in that picture, you look fine to me. Go running and you will lose some weight [run 3 miles one day a week]. If you want to look skinnier, go down to 150 and that is enough. But right now you are normal looking and not "fat". I don't like skinny girls because they don't look healthy to me. I like a woman with some meat on her!
 
chef_NU said:
Your "diabetic diet" consisted of avoiding foods with high glycemic index I assume? This means avoiding sugar and processed carbohydrates, things that EVERYONE should be avoiding. If you eat well and exercise, yes you will lose weight. Duh. This is the only thing you need to know. Don't go waste your money on bloodwork and glucophage.
Just to note, before you start any major health changes most will advise you to see your physician or a nutritionist to make sure its the right thing for you. What works for one thing may not work for another. Blood work can be an important component of that. Additionally, not all of our bodies respond the same. The GLORY of medicine, so some require special diets or meal plans. :thumbup:
 
Hardbody said:
STOP DRINKING BEER ASAP!! Get to the gym, drink zero calori soda and sugar free redbull. Drink Bacardi Rum (I hear that is low calorie), go to the gm, even if it is only for 1/2 hour a day!



Why do people think that zero calorie soda is the bees knees? What's wrong with good ole H2O?
 
mshheaddoc said:
Just to note, before you start any major health changes most will advise you to see your physician or a nutritionist to make sure its the right thing for you. What works for one thing may not work for another. Blood work can be an important component of that. Additionally, not all of our bodies respond the same. The GLORY of medicine, so some require special diets or meal plans. :thumbup:
Everyone has a special reason why they are overweight, unfortunately. Stop pretending.
 
brightness said:
Ok, I'm not really obese, but I am significantly overweight, and I want to be a doctor- I am still in my undergrad, so I'm just thinking these issues over. I've always had a lot of difficulty with my weight and even though I exercise, my eating is not what it should be. I have the potential to change, but I have always had difficulties in this area and it seems unlikely that they'll vanish anytime soon.
I feel like...as a doctor who is fat, I would be a farce. How can I give people health advice when I can't even stop stuffing my face and being a lard ass? I don't want to feel this way about myself, so I try to eat healthy and exercise, but I am far from perfect habits or a perfect body. What do you think about fat physicians and medical personnel? Is it completely unacceptable? Will people look down on me? Should overweight people be doctors? Would you see an overweight doctor?
I added a picture so you can see what I look like. I'm in white! I am 5'3 and I weigh 180, and this might seem like a REALLY DUMB post, but I guess I'm just wondering what you think. Feel free to be ruthless.

Quit eating desserts and drinking sodas.

I dropped from 210 to 160 from 2000-2005 simply by not eating desserts or drinking sodas. I didn't even exercise.

No, I would not like to see an overweight doctor, but we have people in our class who are much larger than you.
 
Most people, patients and staff alike, just care if you can do the job.

Pre-meds, whose experience of medicine is mostly theory, can be a lot more judgemental than coworkers, who have their own **** to worry about (and even so, you can see most posters here are supportive). And it sounds like you are a lot harsher on yourself than you need to be.

Doctors smoke/eat too much/don't take their meds, etc. "Physician" is the title of a profession, not an honorific with which to greet superior beings composed of prolapsed goodness and light energy which have kindly taken human form to heal the sick.

I've had a lot of success seeing a dietican. If you have high cholestoral, BP, etc., they can bill your insurance. I got a lot of benifit out of just recording and talking about what I eat -- just forcing myself to be aware of what I am doing has helped a lot.
 
I fall into that morbidly obese category- 290+ at 5'7"ish. I am getting a gastric bypass this summer. If you are a candidate for it and it is something you want to consider you can go for it (although it does not sound like you would qualify from the details you posted). However, this is not the answer for everyone.

I did not have a problem with ADCOMs on this. However, I also made sure that I was immacutely dressed for every interview so I would recommend that you spend a lot of time looking for the right suit.
 
Anybody try a low carb-diet? What about the Atkins diet? I know there are critics and I'm one of them, but it does seem quite effective for some morbidly obese people.
 
vtucci said:
I fall into that morbidly obese category- 290+ at 5'7"ish. I am getting a gastric bypass this summer. If you are a candidate for it and it is something you want to consider you can go for it (although it does not sound like you would qualify from the details you posted). However, this is not the answer for everyone.

I did not have a problem with ADCOMs on this. However, I also made sure that I was immacutely dressed for every interview so I would recommend that you spend a lot of time looking for the right suit.

Why don't you just quit eating so much food?

Cut out desserts and sodas for starters. I lost 50 lbs doing this.

Also try taking some green tea extract.
 
BlondeCookie said:
Anybody try a low carb-diet? What about the Atkins diet? I know there are critics and I'm one of them, but it does seem quite effective for some morbidly obese people.

I think the best diet is a low-sugar diet.

Eat like a diabetic is supposed to, or you will become one.
 
OSUdoc08 said:
Why don't you just quit eating so much food?
That is, of course, completely true. But if it were that simple, there wouldn't be only a 5% long-term success rate for weight loss. Maybe you're one of the 5%. Or maybe you're due for a relapse.
 
Yeah especially when you have over 100 lbs that you need to lose. Its a risky procedure but I personally have known a few people that went through it. We all tried to persuade her otherwise to try dieting but she was so fed up on trying. She wasn't even really that rotund. Its just hard to maintain diets especially when you are older and female. So much to be done, esp with family responsibilities. That's just my experience from the women who've had it.

I wonder if Jerry really had gastric bypass instead of subway ;)
 
Anyone remember the sugar buster diet?


That was the only fad diet that seemed healthy and logical.
 
mshheaddoc said:
I wonder if Jerry really had gastric bypass instead of subway ;)
Jerry had AIDS!
Or rather, aides.
 
liverotcod said:
That is, of course, completely true. But if it were that simple, there wouldn't be only a 5% long-term success rate for weight loss. Maybe you're one of the 5%. Or maybe you're due for a relapse.

It has nothing to do with success rates and relapses and all to do with SELF-CONTROL.

The relapse occurs when you decide to buy Little Debbies at Kroger.

Just don't.

Physicians should have this self-control, and not be getting surgery to narrow the lumen of their stomach so they can't fit as much food down there.

We had a classmate get this surgery, but claimed she was hospitalized with EBV mononucleosis. We used class funds to buy her flowers and a card.
 
liverotcod said:
Jerry had AIDS!
Or rather, aides.
Jared wants to give everyone AIDS and share his weight loss trick with the world

i thought it was jared, not jerry?
 
OSUdoc08 said:
It has nothing to do with success rates and relapses and all to do with SELF-CONTROL.

The relapse occurs when you decide to buy Little Debbies at Kroger.

Just don't.

Physicians should have this self-control, and not be getting surgery to narrow the lumen of their stomach so they can't fit as much food down there.

We had a classmate get this surgery, but claim she was hospitalized with EBV mononucleosis. We used class funds to buy her flowers and a card.

That b***h just couldn't quit eating desserts.


wow.

there's a book. it's old. but it's still really valid when it comes to women and weight. it's called "fat is a feminist issue."

whether conscious or not, for a lot of women, weight issues and food issues have NOTHING to do with a lack self control around eating. eating, not eating, what one's eating are huge preoccupations. it even usually has NOTHING really to do with food at all. eating isn't about food for a lot of people. it's about self-care, self-love, and filling a non-food-hunger void.

granted, not true for everyone, but it's common enough that you should be aware and empathetic about it.

maybe for you "just not eating dessert" is a simple matter of deciding not to and then moving on. that's not true for everyone.

i want to reiterate something someone else posted. do you think it's easy being overweight in this society? do you think someone who's heavy doesn't realize that fact? or doesn't realize how much people like you, who are many, hate them and blame them for it? do you think it's easy? easy to be heavy? easy to lose weight?

i'm overweight by about 50 lbs. i'm 30, and overstressed, and have no time (i make the choice to give a lot of time to my community in addition to regular responsibilites) but last summer, i really tried to lose. i dieted, i exercized. by the end of about 6 months, i managed to drop 20 lbs. but you know what? i was still fat. i worked so hard for months, deprived myself of everything i enjoyed eating, put my friends and fun on hold for the gym 5X a week (i couldn't let gym time interfere with my volunteer work, two jobs, or classes) and i was more miserable than when i started. i felt so awful all the time. and i hated myself more than i had when i was fatter, because now, not only did i feel like those with issues about my weight hated me, but i felt like i was hating myself by putting myself through the process. i grew up in a family where food was love. you cooked only for people you loved. you showed people you loved them by cooking for them. that was ingrained early on my psyche. with the overlapping and contradictory societal imprinting that only thin people are "good" and "smart" and atll that BS. dieting makes me feel like i hate myself, because it was me not feeding myself and it was me giving in and believing society that if i was fat i was dumb and bad.

so i stopped dieting, because i don't hate myself. and i refuse to put the hatred and judgement of others (like you) on myself. i don't lack self control, i know that. i sleep 4 hours a night. i work two jobs and volunteer up to 30 hours on top of it. i'm punctual and hard working and highly productive. i'm incredibly self-diciplined in most things. i'm not fat because i can't control what i eat. i can if i choose to, but i choose something else. and that's my right as a person. you, me, future patients, everyone has a right to make their own choices as long as they accept the consequences. i keep working out 3X a week, and mind you, with what my day job is right now, even with 50 extra pounds, i guarantee you i am at least as fit as you are, and i'm perfectly healthy, but i quit the dieting. and i feel much better.

the turning point? i was at the gym in oversized yoga pants and a big t-shirt, running on the tread mill because god forbid that i ever make anyone look at my societally unacceptable body... had my iPod on, but could still hear people around me. these two guys, probably early 20's, walk by and one say to the other "goddamnit, i wish they would have separate gyms for fat people. i hate to see them jiggling around, it makes me sick." he could have been talking about me, or the other woman two down from me, but it didn't matter. i realized that i'm healthy. and if it's people like that who i'm trying to live up to their expectations of me, that's BS and screw it, they're not worth it. people who want everyone to be thin, but don't want to deal with people, or cut them slack, when they're TRYING to get there. again, screw 'em. that snapped me out of my being an accomplice in it all. and it's been much better since...

[EDIT] to bring it back to the OP. i'm sure it depends on the patient. personally, i don't see how me being heavy would hurt anything. let's say i have a patient who's not fit and for whom losing weight could help with a specific medical issue, let's say GIRD, for example. i'd say to the patient " i know you probably know this, but losing weight could help with this problem. losing weight can be really hard for most people..." at which point they would likely pipe up about all the things they've tried in the past...and then, i could talk to them about what felt like it was or wasn't working and why whatever effort they had stopped before, and work with them, if they are interested in losing (always leaving that as their choice as an adult with control over their own body), in terms of getting them support that is appropriate for them -- weight watchers, nutritionist, personal trainer, therapy, etc...
 
noonday said:
wow.

there's a book. it's old. but it's still really valid when it comes to women and weight. it's called "fat is a feminist issue."

whether conscious or not, for a lot of women, weight issues and food issues have NOTHING to do with a lack self control around eating. eating, not eating, what one's eating are huge preoccupations. it even usually has NOTHING really to do with food at all. eating isn't about food for a lot of people. it's about self-care, self-love, and filling a non-food-hunger void.

granted, not true for everyone, but it's common enough that you should be aware and empathetic about it.

maybe for you "just not eating dessert" is a simple matter of deciding not to and then moving on. that's not true for everyone.

i want to reiterate something someone else posted. do you think it's easy being overweight in this society? do you think someone who's heavy doesn't realize that fact? or doesn't realize how much people like you, who are many, hate them and blame them for it? do you think it's easy? easy to be heavy? easy to lose weight?

i'm overweight by about 50 lbs. i'm 30, and overstressed, and have no time (i make the choice to give a lot of time to my community in addition to regular responsibilites) but last summer, i really tried to lose. i dieted, i exercized. by the end of about 6 months, i managed to drop 20 lbs. but you know what? i was still fat. i worked so hard for months, deprived myself of everything i enjoyed eating, put my friends and fun on hold for the gym 5X a week (i couldn't let gym time interfere with my volunteer work, two jobs, or classes) and i was more miserable than when i started. i felt so awful all the time. and i hated myself more than i had when i was fatter, because now, not only did i feel like those with issues about my weight hated me, but i felt like i was hating myself by putting myself through the process. i grew up in a family where food was love. you cooked only for people you loved. you showed people you loved them by cooking for them. that was ingrained early on my psyche. with the overlapping and contradictory societal imprinting that only thin people are "good" and "smart" and atll that BS. dieting makes me feel like i hate myself, because it was me not feeding myself and it was me giving in and believing society that if i was fat i was dumb and bad.

so i stopped dieting, because i don't hate myself. and i refuse to put the hatred and judgement of others (like you) on myself. i don't lack self control, i know that. i sleep 4 hours a night. i work two jobs and volunteer up to 30 hours on top of it. i'm punctual and hard working and highly productive. i'm incredibly self-diciplined in most things. i'm not fat because i can't control what i eat. i can if i choose to, but i choose something else. and that's my right as a person. you, me, future patients, everyone has a right to make their own choices as long as they accept the consequences. i keep working out 3X a week, and mind you, with what my day job is right now, even with 50 extra pounds, i guarantee you i am at least as fit as you are, and i'm perfectly healthy, but i quit the dieting. and i feel much better.

the turning point? i was at the gym in oversized yoga pants and a big t-shirt, running on the tread mill because god forbid that i ever make anyone look at my societally unacceptable body... had my iPod on, but could still hear people around me. these two guys, probably early 20's, walk by and one say to the other "goddamnit, i wish they would have separate gyms for fat people. i hate to see them jiggling around, it makes me sick." he could have been talking about me, or the other woman two down from me, but it didn't matter. i realized that i'm healthy. and if it's people like that who i'm trying to live up to their expectations of me, that's BS and screw it, they're not worth it. people who want everyone to be thin, but don't want to deal with people, or cut them slack, when they're TRYING to get there. again, screw 'em. that snapped me out of my being an accomplice in it all. and it's been much better since...

[EDIT] to bring it back to the OP. i'm sure it depends on the patient. personally, i don't see how me being heavy would hurt anything. let's say i have a patient who's not fit and for whom losing weight could help with a specific medical issue, let's say GIRD, for example. i'd say to the patient " i know you probably know this, but losing weight could help with this problem. losing weight can be really hard for most people..." at which point they would likely pipe up about all the things they've tried in the past...and then, i could talk to them about what felt like it was or wasn't working and why whatever effort they had stopped before, and work with them, if they are interested in losing (always leaving that as their choice as an adult with control over their own body), in terms of getting them support that is appropriate for them -- weight watchers, nutritionist, personal trainer, therapy, etc...

That's a long post for me to come to the same conclusion as before. It looks like you still eat desserts. It's funny how people work so hard to lose weight by exercise, but never can, because they keep having donuts for breakfast and swiss cake rolls for an afternoon snack.

The funny thing is that I didn't even need to to exercise to lose weight. I just find it odd that you work so hard to be unsuccessful, since you refuse to watch what you eat.

The problem is that many women think a diet is where you eat things that you don't like and don't eat things you do for a short amount of time to lose weight.

In reality a diet is a lifestyle that you do every day for the rest of your life. It has to do with eating things you enjoy, but also limiting things that are bad for you. The reason why so many people fail dieting is that they try to completely eliminate something instead of just reducing it.

Good luck.
 
Look, buy this book and use it as your health bible. By judging my fitness, and the success of my friends after giving them this book, I can say that life couldn't be any better for any of us. http://www.netnutri.com/browse.cfm/4,2026.htm

Get a routine down, only drink water, and LOTS of it. Buy a personal water-shaker cup and make it your new best friend. Carry it with you at all times, and keep it full constantly.

This book has recipies for many healthy meals, each based around 45% carbs, 35% protein, and 20% fat. This percentage is based around giving your body ONLY enough clean carbs to fuel your muscles and NEVER enough to store as fat. Although this book is based around building muscle, it mainly focuses on burning fat, and turning your body healthy.

You will be eating several smaller meals throughout the day, and guess what -- anyone can do it. Buy some tupperware containers at walmart and carry each days food with you. Simply microwave when it's time to eat. Your metabolism will be boosting as your body sheds weight. Also, while eating proper nutrition your BRAIN will be running on FULL and studying will be made so much easier with less fatigue!!!!!!!!!!!!

I could go on for days talking about nutrition and how important this book is but I will stop here for now.

Bottom line, get a diet routine going, drink ONLY water, and you too will see very important health benefits that will increase your current health state, along with increased years on your life.(Diet is the MOST important part, you get this worked out, and the working out parts will work their way right in to the picture.)
 
OSUdoc08 said:
That's a long post for me to come to the same conclusion as before. It looks like you still eat desserts. It's funny how people work so hard to lose weight by exercise, but never can, because they keep having donuts for breakfast and swiss cake rolls for an afternoon snack.

The funny thing is that I didn't even need to to exercise to lose weight. I just find it odd that you work so hard to be unsuccessful, since you refuse to watch what you eat.

The problem is that many women think a diet is where you eat things that you don't like and don't eat things you do for a short amount of time to lose weight.

In reality a diet is a lifestyle that you do every day for the rest of your life. It has to do with eating things you enjoy, but also limiting things that are bad for you. The reason why so many people fail dieting is that they try to completely eliminate something instead of just reducing it.

Good luck.


what part of "it's not about the specific food" didn't you get? the problem with many women has nothing to do with what you think it does. the problem with many women (and some men), is that many of us never do anything just for ourselves. we work for our bosses at work, we take care of the kids, we manage the household, we have to make time for the partner, etc. and most people who volunteer purely selflessly are women. we give mroe time to our communities, our neighbors, our schools. we are trained that women are to be selfless and giving. we're busy and tired and give so much more than we get back, and we look for ways to give something to ourselves, to take care of oursleves, to soothe ourselves, that doesn't involve taking anything away from the other people we take care of. food happens to fill that. so eating becomes representative of self-care, because it is giving to yourself without taking from someone else (in terms of time, or energy, etc.)

it's nice that you didn't need to exercise. you've got a good metabolism. many don't. i kept exercise because it was a way to take care of myself and stay active. i really don't care about the weight anymore as an entity. i care about what it represents. but you're going to read this and only think that i would be thin by now if only i didn't eat donuts. well, i don't. or cake rolls or ice cream or any of that. i don't like sweets. it's fried food ;-). and i feel worse telling myself No when i want it than i do being fat. and i think it's awful of you to tell me, or anyone, that how i feel and what choice i make is "wrong" or "bad" and to degrade someone (classmate of yours) because they chose surgery for this issue. her choice.
 
noonday said:
what part of "it's not about the specific food" didn't you get? the problem with many women has nothing to do with what you think it does. the problem with many women (and some men), is that many of us never do anything just for ourselves. we work for our bosses at work, we take care of the kids, we manage the household, we have to make time for the partner, etc. and most people who volunteer purely selflessly are women. we give mroe time to our communities, our neighbors, our schools. we are trained that women are to be selfless and giving. we're busy and tired and give so much more than we get back, and we look for ways to give something to ourselves, to take care of oursleves, to soothe ourselves, that doesn't involve taking anything away from the other people we take care of. food happens to fill that. so eating becomes representative of self-care, because it is giving to yourself without taking from someone else (in terms of time, or energy, etc.)

it's nice that you didn't need to exercise. you've got a good metabolism. many don't. i kept exercise because it was a way to take care of myself and stay active. i really don't care about the weight anymore as an entity. i care about what it represents. but you're going to read this and only think that i would be thin by now if only i didn't eat donuts. well, i don't. or cake rolls or ice cream or any of that. i don't like sweets. it's fried food ;-). and i feel worse telling myself No when i want it than i do being fat. and i think it's awful of you to tell me, or anyone, that how i feel and what choice i make is "wrong" or "bad" and to degrade someone (classmate of yours) because they chose surgery for this issue. her choice.

You make such an easy solution appear to be so difficult.

Reward yourself with grilled chicken for an entree and fresh fruit for dessert.

If you tell me you don't like grilled chicken, then that means you haven't seasoned it properly.

Try a lean cut of meat or even some grilled fish!

You don't have to reward yourself with fried chicken for your hard work.

There really isn't any point in exercising if you cannot get past this important concept, since if your diet isn't healthy, exercise is a moot point.
 
There is nothing more pathetic in health care than a fat doctor.

It shows laziness and an inability to understand basic health care concepts.
 
tibor75 said:
There is nothing more pathetic in health care than a fat doctor.

It shows laziness and an inability to understand basic health care concepts.

Best post on this thread. :thumbup: :thumbup:
 
brightness said:
Ok, I'm not really obese, but I am significantly overweight, and I want to be a doctor- I am still in my undergrad, so I'm just thinking these issues over. I've always had a lot of difficulty with my weight and even though I exercise, my eating is not what it should be. I have the potential to change, but I have always had difficulties in this area and it seems unlikely that they'll vanish anytime soon.
I feel like...as a doctor who is fat, I would be a farce. How can I give people health advice when I can't even stop stuffing my face and being a lard ass? I don't want to feel this way about myself, so I try to eat healthy and exercise, but I am far from perfect habits or a perfect body. What do you think about fat physicians and medical personnel? Is it completely unacceptable? Will people look down on me? Should overweight people be doctors? Would you see an overweight doctor?
I added a picture so you can see what I look like. I'm in white! I am 5'3 and I weigh 180, and this might seem like a REALLY DUMB post, but I guess I'm just wondering what you think. Feel free to be ruthless.

Well weight is always an issue but i think if you are really wanting to have some validation with patients, you should really try to look healthier
 
Eat more fruits and vegetables;)
 
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