Finding an EMT-B job

Discussion in 'Pre-Hospital [ EMS ]' started by Sirius Black, Mar 14, 2004.

  1. Sirius Black

    Sirius Black Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2003
    Messages:
    277
    Likes Received:
    1
    Jobs as EMT-Basics don't seem to be in high demand. How did you go about finding one? And is an EMT-B the same as a volunteer, meaning that you don't get paid for it?
     
  2. beanbean

    beanbean 1K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2002
    Messages:
    1,298
    Likes Received:
    11
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    No. EMT-B is the level of certification. The 'B' stands for 'basic' and that is the level of care you provide. Paramedics (EMT-P) are trained in Advanced Life Support (ALS) There is another level valled EMT-Intermediate (EMT-I) which is not found in all areas. EMT-I's can start IVs and perform other skills that basic EMTs can not.

    You can volunteer or be paid as an EMT. Paid positions for 911 services are often at the paramedic level; it depends on what type of service is in your area. Many cities and towns have integrated fire/ems departments and their personnel are Firefighter/Paramedics or Firefighter/EMTs. In other areas Fire and EMS are completely separate. Here in CT many paid services have ALS rigs with one EMT and one Paramedic - as the EMT you drive the rig unless it is a very basic call. They also have BLS units which have two EMT-B's In this area it is not hard to find a job as an EMT-B, but the pay isn't very good and you may get stuck driving the rig all the time or only doing BLS calls. Another option is to work as a ER Tech after you get your EMT-B.

    I have been a volunteer EMT for 18 years - 14 as a basic and 4 as an EMT-I. One nice thing about volunteering is that most volunteer services do only 911 calls. Not that all 911 calls are true emergencies, but you are less of a taxi service than many of the paid service rigs. There are paid services that also only do 911 calls - it depends on the service agreement they have with the city or town.

    Call around to the various services in your area and find out how the EMS system operates. Ask if they are paid or volunteer, city or private service employees, part of the fire services or separate, and where can you take a class in the area. The EMT-B class is about 120 hours plus some ride time and state and/or national certification exam (written and practical).
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Sirius Black

    Sirius Black Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2003
    Messages:
    277
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thanks for the clarification. It seems that most of the jobs in the Tampa area are for Firefighter/EMTs, but I'll make some calls to find out some more. I wouldn't mind being a volunteer, as I really just wanna save people and be where the action is.

    One more question. When they allow you to drive as an EMT-B, do you have to take an extra driving course or is that just included in the EMT-B curriculum?
     
  4. beanbean

    beanbean 1K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2002
    Messages:
    1,298
    Likes Received:
    11
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Driving is not part of the EMT-B class. You don't need a special license to drive an ambulance here in CT. Most services offer their own form of driver training. Often to be a driver the insurance company will require that you be at least 21 yrs old. Call around to some of the smaller towns in your area if you are are looking to volunteer - that's where you usually find the vol. services. Most larger towns and cities use private services or have muncipal employees.
     
  5. raDiOnut

    raDiOnut Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2002
    Messages:
    258
    Likes Received:
    0
    In my agency in MI, there was no driving course required. I took a one-hour "drive around the high school parking lot" and that was it. The rest of my driving-training was on the job. Scary, huh? Driving's one of the main things I do (unfortunately my current medic partner can't drive, so he gets to take the back on all the calls this month) and it gets a little old after awhile... I'm also under 21, and our insurance company is ok with that.

    raDiOnut
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...

Share This Page