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Flinders University in Australia

wasvsdal

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    A) What is the Cost of Attendance for International Students?
    B) Should an American do it? My other best shot is a DO program, because my gpa is pretty low at 3.0.
    C) I kind of want to see Australia, and this will give me that opportunity.
    D) I'll get a different perspective on medicine.
    E) Its one of the best universities in Australia, as opposed to going to a mediocre to low-end university in America.
    F) If I decide to practice there afterwards, itll be so much better than here. I hear as a doctor you only work 50 hour weeks during your residency, and get paid for any overtime you put.
    G) Not sure how I feel about this PBL curriculum, sounds pretty bogus to me.

    I sent an e-mail to their director -- this was his response.

    I am attaching a brochure which is a little more specific to international students than the website

    The following comments relate to US students returning home after graduation. In fact, the majority of our international students are Canadian and about half of them go back to Canada and half stay here. These days we have just 2 or 3 US students per year (although more 10 years back) and probably the majority of them go back to the US for Residencies. For this they need to sit the US Medical Licensing Exams (USMLEs) Step 1 (Biomedical science), Step 2 CK (a multiple choice clinical knowledge exam) and Step 2 CS which is an in-person clinical skills exam. In general Flinders students do well on these exams with mean results above the means from first attempt scores of US and Canadian students. Our US students typically go into the Match run by the ECFMG and in general have found Residencies in places they were happy with and in disciplines they wanted – Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Radiology, Pathology, Obs and Gyn, Family Medicine, Orthopedic Surgery etc. Obviously it will be slightly tougher with a degree from outside North America but so far students who have done OK in our course have done well with Residencies.

    Typically, North Americans use their 12 weeks of electives in Year 4 to do rotations in the US (or Canada) so as to have references from the US when applying in the Match. In some cases they complete 18 weeks of final year rotations in the US (allowed as long as you are not borderline in Year 3).

    On the issue of options for US students staying in Australia after graduation, there is some comment on our website http://www.flinders.edu.au/gemp/new (click on “After Graduation” and then “International Applicants” in the left hand menus)
    On the subject of staying in Australia, the website gives pretty much the best current summary. In recent years, all international graduates from Flinders who have wanted to stay for internships have been able to find them in Adelaide, including all our 2009 graduates. However the question is how increasing numbers of Australian graduates this year and over the following two years will change this (The federal government increased medical school places for Australian students by about 50% and the extra graduates start to flow through from this December). The good news is that internship allocations for 2011 have recently been released and our international final year students seem to be getting Intern offers where they have sought them. In fact one Canadian I talked to yesterday has been offered places in both Adelaide and Alice Springs (in the Northern Territory). This is encouraging in that the initial wave of extra graduates from Flinders and interstate 4 year graduate entry courses arrives in December but it seems there is still a reasonable supply of intern places left for International students In SA and NT. There is still a question about places when extra graduates from the Univ of Adelaide (6 year course) are competing for places in 2013.
    At this point SA (and Northern Territory, where Flinders has a couple of Clinical Schools) look a lot better than the eastern states but we can’t yet say with confidence that this will apply by the time your potential cohort graduates in 2014. We ARE hopeful.

    After internship. You would have to seek Permanent Resident status to go onto to specialist training. Up to now US students have been able to train in their desired area although again the future is less clear.
     

    PacificBlue2012

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      In my opinion Flinders would be better than a Caribbean school, but you will need an extremely high MCAT, well over 31+ to get in there, because they have some of the highest MCATs needed for an Aussie school.

      Even if you go DO, it will still be easier to match into a residency, lets face it, with the economic problems in America, hospitals are cutting back on residency positions and there are more DO and MD schools opening up which means fewer places available for non US graduates. So in other words go to a DO school, you are a US citizen and you will have the most chances there.


      Going to an upper tier Aussie school vs a lower tier American school is not a good comparison, even if you went to Oxford, the bottom line is that you are an IMG in the eyes of the medical community in the US. Also have you really been to Oz? I bet not. I was a resident in Oz for two years before I decided to take the plunge and study medicine here.

      Australia is a great country but its really far away, I hope you realize this.
       
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      cosycatus

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        A) What is the Cost of Attendance for International Students?
        B) Should an American do it? My other best shot is a DO program, because my gpa is pretty low at 3.0.
        C) I kind of want to see Australia, and this will give me that opportunity.
        D) I'll get a different perspective on medicine.
        E) Its one of the best universities in Australia, as opposed to going to a mediocre to low-end university in America.
        F) If I decide to practice there afterwards, itll be so much better than here. I hear as a doctor you only work 50 hour weeks during your residency, and get paid for any overtime you put.
        G) Not sure how I feel about this PBL curriculum, sounds pretty bogus to me.

        I sent an e-mail to their director -- this was his response.

        I am attaching a brochure which is a little more specific to international students than the website

        The following comments relate to US students returning home after graduation. In fact, the majority of our international students are Canadian and about half of them go back to Canada and half stay here. These days we have just 2 or 3 US students per year (although more 10 years back) and probably the majority of them go back to the US for Residencies. For this they need to sit the US Medical Licensing Exams (USMLEs) Step 1 (Biomedical science), Step 2 CK (a multiple choice clinical knowledge exam) and Step 2 CS which is an in-person clinical skills exam. In general Flinders students do well on these exams with mean results above the means from first attempt scores of US and Canadian students. Our US students typically go into the Match run by the ECFMG and in general have found Residencies in places they were happy with and in disciplines they wanted – Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Radiology, Pathology, Obs and Gyn, Family Medicine, Orthopedic Surgery etc. Obviously it will be slightly tougher with a degree from outside North America but so far students who have done OK in our course have done well with Residencies.

        Typically, North Americans use their 12 weeks of electives in Year 4 to do rotations in the US (or Canada) so as to have references from the US when applying in the Match. In some cases they complete 18 weeks of final year rotations in the US (allowed as long as you are not borderline in Year 3).

        On the issue of options for US students staying in Australia after graduation, there is some comment on our website http://www.flinders.edu.au/gemp/new (click on “After Graduation” and then “International Applicants” in the left hand menus)
        On the subject of staying in Australia, the website gives pretty much the best current summary. In recent years, all international graduates from Flinders who have wanted to stay for internships have been able to find them in Adelaide, including all our 2009 graduates. However the question is how increasing numbers of Australian graduates this year and over the following two years will change this (The federal government increased medical school places for Australian students by about 50% and the extra graduates start to flow through from this December). The good news is that internship allocations for 2011 have recently been released and our international final year students seem to be getting Intern offers where they have sought them. In fact one Canadian I talked to yesterday has been offered places in both Adelaide and Alice Springs (in the Northern Territory). This is encouraging in that the initial wave of extra graduates from Flinders and interstate 4 year graduate entry courses arrives in December but it seems there is still a reasonable supply of intern places left for International students In SA and NT. There is still a question about places when extra graduates from the Univ of Adelaide (6 year course) are competing for places in 2013.
        At this point SA (and Northern Territory, where Flinders has a couple of Clinical Schools) look a lot better than the eastern states but we can’t yet say with confidence that this will apply by the time your potential cohort graduates in 2014. We ARE hopeful.

        After internship. You would have to seek Permanent Resident status to go onto to specialist training. Up to now US students have been able to train in their desired area although again the future is less clear.

        What is the Cost of Attendance for International Students?
        It's 45K per year fixed for 2011 entry. It will be ~47-48K AUD for 2012.

        B) Should an American do it? My other best shot is a DO program, because my gpa is pretty low at 3.0.

        If u have a good MCAT score of >31, u stand a good chance, provided u do okay at the interviews. Alternatively, can go to Queensland with their pretty lenient admission standards.

        Depends on where u want to practise and what u want to practise. Auzzie med do not prepare u for USMLE at all. Going back to US as an IMG will not lend u a hot residency, but internal med, neurology, general surgery, etc at second tier should not be a problem.

        C) I kind of want to see Australia, and this will give me that opportunity.
        Adelaide is kinda boring u know?

        D) I'll get a different perspective on medicine.
        E) Its one of the best universities in Australia, as opposed to going to a mediocre to low-end university in America.

        It's not one of the best. It's at best a second tier uni. The best medical schools are Sydney, Melbourne and Adelaide. Australians do not care too much about university rankings. The belief is that if u can graduate from med school, you are a competent doctor. But typically , the 3 unviersities i mention have excellent academics and track records of turning out doctors who do well clinically. That said, Flinders will provide u with an excellent education as well..


        F) If I decide to practice there afterwards, itll be so much better than here. I hear as a doctor you only work 50 hour weeks during your residency, and get paid for any overtime you put.

        Rite. As a foreginer, u can only practise in areas designated as area of need which means rural. Tax is ~30%. There is no residency program. Doctors start as houseman ( or intern) and vie for training spots. Many wait for years before starting internal medi training.
        Furthermore, there's a new medical school springing up every now and then and spots for internationals are getting lesser. Tat said, Adelaide is pretty much protected as only U adelaide and flinders offers med.

        G) Not sure how I feel about this PBL curriculum, sounds pretty bogus to me.
        My...then why do u want to attend a bogus school and be a bogus doctor?

        I assume the program director is Dr Edwards? He doesn't mince words.
         

        PacificBlue2012

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          What is the Cost of Attendance for International Students?
          It's 45K per year fixed for 2011 entry. It will be ~47-48K AUD for 2012.

          B) Should an American do it? My other best shot is a DO program, because my gpa is pretty low at 3.0.

          If u have a good MCAT score of >31, u stand a good chance, provided u do okay at the interviews. Alternatively, can go to Queensland with their pretty lenient admission standards.

          Depends on where u want to practise and what u want to practise. Auzzie med do not prepare u for USMLE at all. Going back to US as an IMG will not lend u a hot residency, but internal med, neurology, general surgery, etc at second tier should not be a problem.

          C) I kind of want to see Australia, and this will give me that opportunity.
          Adelaide is kinda boring u know?

          D) I'll get a different perspective on medicine.
          E) Its one of the best universities in Australia, as opposed to going to a mediocre to low-end university in America.

          It's not one of the best. It's at best a second tier uni. The best medical schools are Sydney, Melbourne and Adelaide. Australians do not care too much about university rankings. The belief is that if u can graduate from med school, you are a competent doctor. But typically , the 3 unviersities i mention have excellent academics and track records of turning out doctors who do well clinically. That said, Flinders will provide u with an excellent education as well..


          F) If I decide to practice there afterwards, itll be so much better than here. I hear as a doctor you only work 50 hour weeks during your residency, and get paid for any overtime you put.

          Rite. As a foreginer, u can only practise in areas designated as area of need which means rural. Tax is ~30%. There is no residency program. Doctors start as houseman ( or intern) and vie for training spots. Many wait for years before starting internal medi training.
          Furthermore, there's a new medical school springing up every now and then and spots for internationals are getting lesser. Tat said, Adelaide is pretty much protected as only U adelaide and flinders offers med.

          G) Not sure how I feel about this PBL curriculum, sounds pretty bogus to me.
          My...then why do u want to attend a bogus school and be a bogus doctor?

          I assume the program director is Dr Edwards? He doesn't mince words.


          If you really want to be in Australia, go ahead, its definitely better than most other foreign medical schools, especially in the Caribbean. But if you go back to the US don't get disappointed if you wind up in primary care. If someone at Flinders got Radiology, that is pretty damn good. No one I knew at USyd got that kind of residency, the few I know got Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, the typical IMG residencies. Occasionally someone gets something really good but its more of an exception.

          The main advantage of the DO is that you are in the US, even moving across the US is not as daunting as being in a foreign country. Trust me, many North Americans experience some kind of homesickness here, its really silly what they will miss, be it Taco Bell or Tim Hortons, or driving on the other side of the road. I myself could not readjust to America, it just did not look the same after living in Australia for a while.

          I am originally from Detroit Michigan, went to undergrad in Ann Arbor, went to USyd for Medicine, now live in Sydney. You could not pay me a million dollars to go back to Detroit or the Midwest. The only parts of the US that I would even consider such as California, are impossible for IMGs.

          Vacation time and hours are much better in Australia than in the US, the average being 5 weeks off a year, so you get like a whole month to visit America if you are that homesick. Also while in uni you get some long breaks too, school is only 9.5 months long unless you fail an exam then your break gets cut short because you need to take it again.

          Also you might notice that your Aussie classmates will have a lot more of a social life than you, that is because they do not have to study for the USMLE. You will need to dedicate at least 10-15 extra hours on top of at least 25 to 30 hours of studying a week. So if you have the idea you are going to have an extended vacation in Oz. Its not going to happen.
           
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          Winged Scapula

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            If someone at Flinders got Radiology, that is pretty damn good. No one I knew at USyd got that kind of residency, the few I know got Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, the typical IMG residencies. Occasionally someone gets something really good but its more of an exception.

            I cannot speak for other classes but of my class at Flinders, one matched Rads, another Derm and I did General Surgery. In the class ahead of us, someone matched into Orthopaedic Surgery (and practices here in town with me ). Even some of those who matched into traditionally less competitive specialties did so at pretty well known programs.

            So it is possible, but all of those who matched into more difficulty specialties did so with a lot of hard work, connections and summer/winter break research projects. That was a long time ago but Dr. Tony Edwards is an honest man and can probably give anyone who requests, more recent updates.

            In an earlier post, PacificBlue, you comment that US hospitals are reducing the number of residency programs. This is inaccurate. The ratio of residency positions:medical students has fallen as the number of the latter has risen, but overall number of residency positions has remained relatively stagnant since former President Clinton's decision in 1994 to limit them. Specific hospitals may close residency programs, but in general, residencies MAKE money for hospitals (despite what they will tell you) and SAVE them money (since they don't have to hire midlevels), so few will close them unless forced to do so.
             

            PacificBlue2012

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              I cannot speak for other classes but of my class at Flinders, one matched Rads, another Derm and I did General Surgery. In the class ahead of us, someone matched into Orthopaedic Surgery (and practices here in town with me ). Even some of those who matched into traditionally less competitive specialties did so at pretty well known programs.

              So it is possible, but all of those who matched into more difficulty specialties did so with a lot of hard work, connections and summer/winter break research projects. That was a long time ago but Dr. Tony Edwards is an honest man and can probably give anyone who requests, more recent updates.

              In an earlier post, PacificBlue, you comment that US hospitals are reducing the number of residency programs. This is inaccurate. The ratio of residency positions:medical students has fallen as the number of the latter has risen, but overall number of residency positions has remained relatively stagnant since former President Clinton's decision in 1994 to limit them. Specific hospitals may close residency programs, but in general, residencies MAKE money for hospitals (despite what they will tell you) and SAVE them money (since they don't have to hire midlevels), so few will close them unless forced to do so.

              So are you trying to say that residencies will be available for IMGs? I seriously doubt it. Most of the statistics suggest it has become harder for both IMGs and FMGs to match in US residencies. So what are you trying to say, are you saying there are considerably more open residency positions than US MD and DO graduates? From what I know a good number of new medical schools have opened up in the US, both MD and DO, and if residency positions remain stagnant, I doubt there will be much opportunity for IMGs in the near future.

              Although the OP is eager to see Australia, I think he should think more seriously about job prospects as well as the debt he is going to be in, considering how uncertain things are, he would better off going the DO route.
               

              Winged Scapula

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                So are you trying to say that residencies will be available for IMGs? I seriously doubt it. Most of the statistics suggest it has become harder for both IMGs and FMGs to match in US residencies. So what are you trying to say, are you saying there are considerably more open residency positions than US MD and DO graduates? From what I know a good number of new medical schools have opened up in the US, both MD and DO, and if residency positions remain stagnant, I doubt there will be much opportunity for IMGs in the near future.

                Although the OP is eager to see Australia, I think he should think more seriously about job prospects as well as the debt he is going to be in, considering how uncertain things are, he would better off going the DO route.

                I have no idea how you made such a leap to state that I was implying that residencies will be available for IMGs.

                I was simply pointing out that you were inaccurate in stating that there were fewer residency positions AND I also stated, as you have, that there are more medical schools, hence the RATIO of positions to grads is lower, but the actual number has not changed. I was also clarifying that there have been graduates of Flinders and other Aussie schools who have gotten into traditionally more competitive residencies than just primary care (RE: your comment about radiology; frankly Derm and Orthopedic Surgery should have been more impressive in terms of matching). Students shouldn't expect that person will be them but given your lack of information on the topic, I thought it would be appreciated that I could provide first hand information on it.

                So I will say it much clearer (even though this was not the point of my post above but you apparently believed it to be so): it is more difficult for IMGs/FMGs to obtain residency positions in the US than it has been in the past and this will become even more difficult in the years to come unless the Clinton Administration embargo on new residency positions is lifted.

                If you would have spent anytime reading my numerous posts on the subject, you will see that I never encourage anyone to choose an education abroad over a US based one, even if it turned out ok for my classmates and I.

                As a new member around here who doesn't even live in Australia, you may not realize this, but I've walked the walk and I know what I'm talking about. There is no sense in trying to "school" me about the debt the OP will be taking on, or all the other reasons why its a bad idea. We've been down this road multiple times before.

                Oh and please keep in mind that insulting other users, even with a mild comment like "dummy", is a violation of the TOS.
                 
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                PacificBlue2012

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                  I have no idea how you made such a leap to state that I was implying that residencies will be available for IMGs.

                  I was simply pointing out that you were inaccurate in stating that there were fewer residency positions AND I also stated, as you have, that there are more medical schools, hence the RATIO of positions to grads is lower, but the actual number has not changed. I was also clarifying that there have been graduates of Flinders and other Aussie schools who have gotten into traditionally more competitive residencies than just primary care (RE: your comment about radiology; frankly Derm and Orthopedic Surgery should have been more impressive in terms of matching). Students shouldn't expect that person will be them but given your lack of information on the topic, I thought it would be appreciated that I could provide first hand information on it.

                  So I will say it much clearer (even though this was not the point of my post above but you apparently believed it to be so): it is more difficult for IMGs/FMGs to obtain residency positions in the US than it has been in the past and this will become even more difficult in the years to come unless the Clinton Administration embargo on new residency positions is lifted.

                  If you would have spent anytime reading my numerous posts on the subject, you will see that I never encourage anyone to choose an education abroad over a US based one, even if it turned out ok for my classmates and I.

                  As a new member around here who doesn't even live in Australia, you may not realize this, but I've walked the walk and I know what I'm talking about. There is no sense in trying to "school" me about the debt the OP will be taking on, or all the other reasons why its a bad idea. We've been down this road multiple times before.

                  Oh and please keep in mind that insulting other users, even with a mild comment like "dummy", is a violation of the TOS.

                  Wrong, I live in Australia and I am an Australian citizen. I immigrated from the US nearly 7 years ago.

                  Most people already know its common sense to go to a US medical school, even a "lower ranked" one than a foreign school.

                  I chose USyd over two lower tier MD schools in the US, but that was because I was an Australian PR at the time and my goal was to be in Australia which I have achieved.

                  I made the case to the current OP that its going to be harder for IMGs to match in the US than in the past, and my cohort, the people who matched into North American residency programs, mostly matched into IM and FM, not Rads or Orthopedics. Although I know of a couple of people from USyd who are doing Orthopedics in the US, just not in my cohort. The USMLE and electives will make a big impact on where you will be able to go for residency.

                  I may have mashed my words, yes residencies are remaining stagnant but the fact is that US medical student numbers are increasing, especially DOs.

                  Also its a fact that the economic problems in America right now are very serious, so who knows what is going to happen from 2010 to 2020.

                  I would say schools like Flinders and other Australian schools are much better than Caribbean schools for the fact that if things do not work out for you stateside you could always stay in Australia, although that is getting more difficult, the fact remains that Australia needs doctors and many of the current medical workforce are set to retire. Also the Gilliard government has allocated a massive amount of funds to increase training spaces, so its a step in the right direction.
                   
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                  Winged Scapula

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                    Wrong, I live in Australia and I am an Australian citizen. I immigrated from the US nearly 7 years ago.

                    I understand that is what you claim but you do realize I can see who your internet service provider is and where you are posting from right?

                    The rest of your post is a simple rehashing of what has been said here time and time again and is, in general, accurate. I am not disagreeing with you on its content (except the wisdom of moving to Australia because of some ill conceived notion that the current economic boom there will remain permanent and the US economy will never recover. As you had said so yourself, moving to Australia is not for everyone; most people will be unhappy being so far from home, so training there with the idea that they can stay there when most will find that untenable is probably not reasonable for *most* people. I would have been happy myself to stay as I have a bit of the wanderlust and am not particularly close with my family, but training requirements at the time did not allow for that readily.).
                     

                    PacificBlue2012

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                      I understand that is what you claim but you do realize I can see who your internet service provider is and where you are posting from right?

                      The rest of your post is a simple rehashing of what has been said here time and time again and is, in general, accurate. I am not disagreeing with you on its content (except the wisdom of moving to Australia because of some ill conceived notion that the current economic boom there will remain permanent and the US economy will never recover. As you had said so yourself, moving to Australia is not for everyone; most people will be unhappy being so far from home, so training there with the idea that they can stay there when most will find that untenable is probably not reasonable for *most* people. I would have been happy myself to stay as I have a bit of the wanderlust and am not particularly close with my family, but training requirements at the time did not allow for that readily.).


                      Wow, again I am misunderstood, what I meant to say is that one can do well in Australia, its a commonly held belief that its only America where one can prosper, that is not true.

                      My advice to the OP was go the DO route, and yes many people I know become homesick, even myself initially for the first few months, I had those feelings but they gradually went away, but this will not be for everyone.
                       
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                      Winged Scapula

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                        Wow, again I am misunderstood, what I meant to say is that one can do well in Australia, its a commonly held belief that its only America where one can prosper, that is not true.

                        I'm not sure you were misunderstood, at least not by me. Nor do I believe that it is common to think that one can only do well in America. If you find yourself commonly misunderstood, you may wish to ask why that is.

                        My point was that it was misguided to advise people to come to Australia under the premise that the economics were better than the US. These things change and should be very low on the list of reasons to emigrate.

                        My advice to the OP was go the DO route, and yes many people I know become homesick, even myself initially for the first few months, I had those feelings but they gradually went away, but this will not be for everyone.

                        This is true and should not be underestimated. Many will never get over the homesickness. I had several classmates for whom that was true. Many others were like you and I, enjoying the difference and appreciating it.

                        BTW, I noted that you did not comment about my reference to your ISP and IP addy (which is not Australian).
                         

                        PacificBlue2012

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                          I'm not sure you were misunderstood, at least not by me. Nor do I believe that it is common to think that one can only do well in America. If you find yourself commonly misunderstood, you may wish to ask why that is.

                          My point was that it was misguided to advise people to come to Australia under the premise that the economics were better than the US. These things change and should be very low on the list of reasons to emigrate.



                          This is true and should not be underestimated. Many will never get over the homesickness. I had several classmates for whom that was true. Many others were like you and I, enjoying the difference and appreciating it.

                          BTW, I noted that you did not comment about my reference to your ISP and IP addy (which is not Australian).

                          My parents were immigrants from Central Europe, so I long had the belief that only in America you can do things, my dad in particular shoved it in me.

                          Of course I don't think someone should go to Australia on the pretense of economics. Anyway the US is still a fairly well off and affluent country, the cost of consumer goods is generally lower than Australia too. Though there are some products that you can get in Australia that you cannot find in America and vice versa. Autos and electronics are cheaper in the US.

                          Although I will say Australia does offer a great lifestyle albeit more relaxed pace of life compared to North America.
                           

                          rayjay

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                            I love internet fights :)

                            For what it's worth, to the OP, just keep in touch with Dr. Edwards. He is the nicest man I've dealt with (re: med school admissions) and time and again he has responded promptly and politely...even when I've asked him the same question.

                            I'm not saying asking him useless questions. Your tuition question was literally a case of going on their website, google, or searching the forums. I hate when people say "use the search button" but this time it was very needed.

                            Other queries such as the licensing exams etc. he is a great resource for. I personally (albeit somewhat "creepily") found old Flinders alum on Facebook and asked them questions. Once we got over the "do I know you" message, they were EXTREMELY helpful and would write me very long, detailed messages regarding everything from how they found studying to how expensive toilet paper was.
                             

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                              Other queries such as the licensing exams etc. he is a great resource for. I personally (albeit somewhat "creepily") found old Flinders alum on Facebook and asked them questions. Once we got over the "do I know you" message, they were EXTREMELY helpful and would write me very long, detailed messages regarding everything from how they found studying to how expensive toilet paper was.

                              You didn't need to stalk people on FB. I've been on SDN since I was a student at Flinders.
                               

                              rayjay

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                                You didn't need to stalk people on FB. I've been on SDN since I was a student at Flinders.

                                Lol fair enough. This way worked equally as effectively and it was pretty easy as well. I will be sure to throw questions at you in the near future when I submit my application.

                                I mainly did it to speak to current/recent Flinders grads. I'm not sure when you graduated but for example I spoke to a current first year and someone who graduated last year (currently interning in Oz but a Canadian from the same province as myself) which I found very helpful.
                                 

                                Winged Scapula

                                Cougariffic!
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                                1. Attending Physician
                                  Lol fair enough. This way worked equally as effectively and it was pretty easy as well. I will be sure to throw questions at you in the near future when I submit my application.

                                  I mainly did it to speak to current/recent Flinders grads. I'm not sure when you graduated but for example I spoke to a current first year and someone who graduated last year (currently interning in Oz but a Canadian from the same province as myself) which I found very helpful.

                                  True, I just thought it would be a little less creepy. ;)

                                  I graduated from Flinders a long time ago (10 years); the second GEMP class so am more useful for residency match stuff that day to day course details.
                                   

                                  wasvsdal

                                  Full Member
                                  10+ Year Member
                                  5+ Year Member
                                  Dec 19, 2006
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                                    Man this is all so nerve wrecking. Working harder in ugrad wouldve made life so much easier. Just read a few threads on current DO students complaining about not finding decent 3rd/4th yr rotations.

                                    Anyways, hopefully I can rock these MCATs. It just sucks that someone with a desire to put their life in misery for the good of this society has to take on this much trouble. I am not saying med schools should start letting unproven people in, but if someone does well on their MCATs and can demonstrate handling a tough course load, i.e. cell bio, mamm phys, immunology then he/she should be able to get in. Im just ranting, i know.

                                    But thanks yall for the input. The author of that email is Tony Edwards, and yes that e-mail def. sounds very genuine. Its good to see a few graduates of Flinders doing well.
                                     

                                    PacificBlue2012

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                                    Aug 28, 2010
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                                      Well I can tell you one of the reasons why there is little data available on Australian graduates in the US is because very few Australian trained doctors go to the States.

                                      Also regardless of DO vs MD, in the eyes of the law, in the US, you will be a doctor. That is what matters. And yes it will make your life a lot easier to go to a DO school, if your plans are to practice in the USA. The DO degree in Australia however is not recognized, therefore its nearly impossible for a DO to be employed as a physician in Australia.
                                       

                                      orderly

                                      Orderly/Student Paramedic
                                      Jan 21, 2010
                                      41
                                      0
                                      South Australia, Australia
                                      1. Other Health Professions Student
                                        Flinders is quite a nice university. I study there at the moment. It is the biggest out of the three main universities in the state and is essentially three campuses on one block of land. We also have our own shopping mall with Subway, Post Office, Bank, Hair Dressers, Pharmacy etc. We also have a loop bus which is free for students and you can get around the whole campus with it.

                                        However, I think the Med School is actually part of Flinders Medical Centre, which is still on campus but it is separate to other disciplines like Nursing, Health Sciences, Paramedics etc.

                                        Adelaide Uni is still considered more 'prestigious' but its all much of a muchness :p
                                         

                                        PacificBlue2012

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                                          Flinders is quite a nice university. I study there at the moment. It is the biggest out of the three main universities in the state and is essentially three campuses on one block of land. We also have our own shopping mall with Subway, Post Office, Bank, Hair Dressers, Pharmacy etc. We also have a loop bus which is free for students and you can get around the whole campus with it.

                                          However, I think the Med School is actually part of Flinders Medical Centre, which is still on campus but it is separate to other disciplines like Nursing, Health Sciences, Paramedics etc.

                                          Adelaide Uni is still considered more 'prestigious' but its all much of a muchness :p

                                          In my opinion, prestige is a meaningless concept, I hold a Bachelors and a Masters from two highly ranked US universities, as well as a Medical degree from U of Sydney.

                                          I have to say compared to the other medical programs, Flinders is one excellent program, its also reasonably small compared to UQ or USyd. Adelaide might not have the excitement of Sydney but the fact is that its a great school and has a long history of taking North American students. Also considering the strong Aussie, Adelaide is a lot more economical than Sydney or other Australian cities.

                                          USyd also has a shopping mall near campus as well.
                                           
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