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Discussion in 'Anesthesiology' started by coccygodynia, Apr 25, 2007.

  1. coccygodynia

    coccygodynia Member
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    Thought you might enjoy the irony ...
     
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  3. IceDoc

    IceDoc Junior Member
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    This is from the NTSB report about that accident:


    The pilot was established on a base leg for runway 15 (6,000 feet by 60 feet, asphalt) when the engine lost power. The pilot lined up with an adjacent road and continued for a forced landing. Prior to the landing he checked his carburetor heat, mixture, throttle, and magnetos in an attempt to troubleshoot the power loss. He stated that he observed car lights and "swerved into [the] tree." The airplane became lodged in the tree, crushing both wings aft and wrinkling the vertical stabilizer.

    The airplane was removed from the tree and relocated to a hangar in Greeley, Colorado, for further examination. An examination of the engine and related systems revealed no anomalies.
     
  4. Monty Python

    Monty Python Icelandic (see avatar) doesn't translate well.
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    Looks like a Piper Cherokee 140, which I trained in. Interesting the flaps appear to still be up.

    Also making his potential emergency landing fun would be the power and telephone lines on the right side of the road. Look closely at the photo and you'll see the poles.
     
  5. IceDoc

    IceDoc Junior Member
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    I trained in a PA 28-161 in Colorado (not far from where this accident took place), and with that airplane and for that density altitude, only 10degrees (1 notch) of flaps, if any, was routinely used.
     
  6. johankriek

    johankriek Membership Revoked
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    i guess you dont like those nursing forums huh....?
     
  7. jetproppilot

    jetproppilot Turboprop Driver
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    OUCH!!

    "Uhhh, Honey, I'm gonna be a little late for dinner..."
     
  8. Monty Python

    Monty Python Icelandic (see avatar) doesn't translate well.
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    Sorry, don't see the connection between your question and the topic of flying.
     
  9. jetproppilot

    jetproppilot Turboprop Driver
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    Trin is an old colleague of mine, an established professional, and a knowledgable contributor to this forum.

    Save your flack for the trolls.
     
  10. johankriek

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    i guess you dont remember this lazy militant crnas( who was too lazy to do medical school) post a few months ago
     
  11. jetproppilot

    jetproppilot Turboprop Driver
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    far from lazy.

    lifestyle/marriage decision.
     
  12. Monty Python

    Monty Python Icelandic (see avatar) doesn't translate well.
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    Johankriek, without getting into a time-wasting exchange of pointless banter, I believe you'll find my previous posts (as a non-physician guest) to be objective and respectful of the anesthesiologist moderators of this forum. I respect your right to have a differing viewpoint without casting insults at you personally.

    Also explained in previous posts are my rationale for deciding to not matriculate medical school last fall. I will overlook your decision to speak in a condescending manner about it, as life is too short for me to worry about one-upping anybody about anything. I sleep soundly at night about decisions I've made in the past, and have no fear of facing God if I were killed in a car wreck this afternoon.
     
  13. burntcrispy

    burntcrispy Member
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    Back to the topic of flying. I'm planning on taking lessons soon but have recently discovered that I'm color blind. Will this prevent me from obtaining a license?

    Thanks.
     
  14. toughlife

    toughlife Resident
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    have you tried the MS flight simulator X? Flying that learjet 45 is sweeeet! Graphics kick ass too.
     
  15. Monty Python

    Monty Python Icelandic (see avatar) doesn't translate well.
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  16. Monty Python

    Monty Python Icelandic (see avatar) doesn't translate well.
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    Here's a partial text. Note: recreational pilots get a third-class medical. Commercial pilots need first-class.

    E. Defective Color Vision. When the applicant has a
    defect in color vision, the inspector must ensure that the
    applicant demonstrates the following abilities:

    (1) All applicants must demonstrate the ability to
    read aeronautical charts for print that appears in various
    sizes, colors, and typefaces; for conventional markings in
    several colors; and for discrimination of terrain colors at a
    distance of 16 inches for both day and night conditions.

    (2) All applicants must demonstrate the ability to
    read aviation instruments, particularly those with colored
    limitation marks and colored instrument panel lights,
    especially marker beacon lights and warning lights.

    (3) All applicants must demonstrate the ability to
    recognize terrain and obstructions. etc etc

    (4) For first-class medical certificates, applicants
    with defective color vision must be tested at twilight
    or at night. The test for a first-class medical
    certificate is much more comprehensive than the tests for
    second- and third-class medical certificates. In addition
    to the above exercises, the applicants for a first-class
    medical certificate must demonstrate the ability to see
    the following objects:

    • Colored lights of other aircraft in the vicinity
    • Runway approach lights
    • Airport boundary lights
    • Taxiway lights
    • Red warning lights on such areas as TV towers,
    high buildings, or stacks
    • Conventional signal lights from the control tower
    • All color signal lights normally used in air traffic
    control (ATC)

    (5) AAM-300 usually requires that applicants
    who have defective color vision take the signal light test
    (SLT) to obtain second- and third-class medical certificates.
    If possible, the test should be given at twilight to
    test the applicant under both daylight and night conditions.
    Under such special arrangements, the night-time
    portion of the test may include tests other than those
    described, such as identification of aircraft, runway,
    threshold, and taxiway lights. Applicants who are able to
    identify colors at night may have the night-time restriction
    removed.
     
  17. burntcrispy

    burntcrispy Member
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    Thanks Trin.

    I'll probably go by the school and ask them what they think. My color blindness isn't all that bad as I've made it this far without ever knowing it. But, I took a test a while back and couldn't see a few of the numbers in the circles (if you're familiar with this type of test). Hopefully it won't be a problem.

    I used to fly alot with my father when I was a kid. I flew with him a couple of years ago and really enjoyed it so now I'm going to try to get my license so I too can fly these "doctor killers":)
     
  18. Monty Python

    Monty Python Icelandic (see avatar) doesn't translate well.
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    Here's how to find a local FAA-designated medical examiner, who knows the gospel about your situation:

    http://www.faa.gov/pilots/amelocator/

    Also a little more general medical information:

    http://www.aviationwise.org/faamedical.html
     
  19. Pilot Doc

    Pilot Doc SDN Angel
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    Color blindness is rarely a show-stopper for a medical certificate. If you fail the normal test, you get something called a SODA (statement of demonstrated ability.) Bascially, someone shines a red light at you, then green and you have to tell them apart.

    Another option to consider is a sport pilot license. It's new as of a couple years ago and requires no medical certificate. If you have a driver's license, you can fly. Take a look at www.sportpilot.org

    Congrats on taking lessons. It's a great hobby!
     
  20. Monty Python

    Monty Python Icelandic (see avatar) doesn't translate well.
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    Just FYI to those interested in this great hobby: when I was a student pilot in 1975, the plane was $35/hr with instructor, $25/hr solo (included gas). Minimum time requirements to take the private pilot check ride was 40 hours as a student pilot. Working on my instrument rating was more expensive.

    Ground school was $100.

    Things are a tad bit more expensive, owing to three decades of inflation.

    My pilot license checkride examiner was in his mid-70s, born in 1901. He was a retired airline pilot. After my checkride we rode to his house near the airport to do the paperwork for my license. As we sat at his kitchen table he told me to look in a nearby pantry. In it was a stack of pilot logbooks two feet high - all his, going back to the 1920s. This dude has umpteen thousand hours of flight time, a lot of that courtesy of World War 2.

    One of the signatures in an early log book was Charles Lindberg's.

    I found a lot of similarities in the thinking patterns and psychomotor skills between flying and anesthesia. If you're good at anesthesia and enjoy it, chances are very good that you'll enjoy a successful time with flying. And if you have a really sharp accountant perhaps you'll be able to deduct your expenses.
     
  21. Bertelman

    Bertelman Maverick!
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    Great scene in the movie Little Miss Sunshine, if anyone's seen it.
     
  22. johankriek

    johankriek Membership Revoked
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    yeah, i understand why you did not matriculate. You were not interested in working that hard. WHy work that hard studying when you can be lobbying congress to get the same rights as a doc without working hard. I know the type. You should take your banter to the nursign forums..
     
  23. Monty Python

    Monty Python Icelandic (see avatar) doesn't translate well.
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    Ask yourself: why would I have gone through all the time/expense/aggravation of the application process, interviews, etc, if I wasn't truly ready to do it? Why go through the extreme mental effort to knock off 30 years of rust to prep for the MCAT, giving up many hours of family time and weekends to get ready for the test, if I wasn't truly interested in it?

    It was only after the acceptance letters started arriving that my wife shared her "true" feelings about the whole situation. :mad: I wish she had been that upfront at the beginning, but .................... For lack of a better way of putting it, I had a choice: my wife and family, or med school (with 1/2 of my 401K signed over to her). Couldn't have it all.

    As you can see, that does not jive with your incorrect generalization, quoted above.
     
  24. AUdacious

    AUdacious ASA Member
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    That is exactly what ran through my mind...too funny.
     
  25. jetproppilot

    jetproppilot Turboprop Driver
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    You've inferred that Trin is a militant CRNA.

    Wrong assessment.
     

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