2Sexy4MedSchool

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Is it just me, or is the Rod of Caduceus kinda phallic looking? What with the ball on the top and the serpent's heads, all that? I never really noticed it before I clicked this link, but in this context it was hard to miss.

On an unrelated note, I've heard there are some hospitals where the OBs do routine circs on little boy babies (b/c the pedes docs don't want to do "surgical" stuff.) Does anyone here belong to such a program? Just curious. 2S4MS
 

dr1day

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Is it just me, or is the Rod of Caduceus kinda phallic looking? What with the ball on the top and the serpent's heads, all that? I never really noticed it before I clicked this link, but in this context it was hard to miss.

On an unrelated note, I've heard there are some hospitals where the OBs do routine circs on little boy babies (b/c the pedes docs don't want to do "surgical" stuff.) Does anyone here belong to such a program? Just curious. 2S4MS
I'm a student at such a program. I think it's weird, too but that's the way it is.
 

anonperson

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Is it just me, or is the Rod of Caduceus kinda phallic looking? What with the ball on the top and the serpent's heads, all that? I never really noticed it before I clicked this link, but in this context it was hard to miss.

On an unrelated note, I've heard there are some hospitals where the OBs do routine circs on little boy babies (b/c the pedes docs don't want to do "surgical" stuff.) Does anyone here belong to such a program? Just curious. 2S4MS
I'm an OB intern at a program that requires us to do circs. I ran into a fair amount of programs that had OB doing circs during residency itnerviews.

Waste of time really. I guess it may be semi-useful in the real world but after 10 or so, you get the hang of it and it's more of a time waster after. I don't even think they reimburse well at all.

I'm not too sure why peds or family medicine doesn't do them since they have actual follow up.
 

Global Disrobal

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As mentioned above many programs teach it and it is part of the intern's usual workload.

On the contrary, it does reimburse well, and some practices (after you're done with residency) will require it as it's a means of bringing in money as well as providing an adiitionsl service to the patients.
 

Ferrismonk

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This is a weird topic for a thread, but I couldn't help put in my two cents.

This website is obviously biased and not fully informed. I'll choose just a couple instances to make my point as this isn't the place for a full critique.

Prevention of STDs: The website states that because STDs are on the rise in the US, circumcision doesn't protect against STDs. Without going into the obvious shortcomings of this argument, circumcision does provide some protection against some STDs such as HIV and HPV. A quick wikipedia search will give you the references, such as the WHO and CDC.

Under "Complications of circumcision", the author gives a reference that in 25 years as a pediatric urologist (who would expect to see the most complications of circumcision btw), he had 75 instances where he had to fix a stricture of the meastus. Interestingly, paraphimosis is one of the main problems people experience if they DON'T have a circumcision. The other argument given is perceived psychological damage of the newborn when done without anesthetic. Every one I've seen has been done under local anesthetic. Plus, psychological damage is tough to measure, and I would believe that being forced to have a circ at age 12 because your meatus is strangulated, would be much more psychologically damaging than a painless procedure at 3 days old.

Under the "Etiology of Circumscion", the author doesn't even mention religion. As most any western educated person knows, circumcision became so popular because of the Jewish, and thus Christian, custom. It is also popular in Islam communities. To not even mention the religious aspect of the procedure, which is viewed as a commandment from God by the worlds most populous religions, isn't balanced or well-informed.


On another note, pediatricians and Ob/Gyns at our hospital do circumcisions, but it is not mandatory. Often the Ob residents do them because they are always at the hospital and it's easier for everyone.

btw, I know this sound anal, but the symbol for medicine is the Rod of Asclepius, not Caduceus. A Caduceus is the staff carried by Hermes, which has 2 snakes and wings on it. The US Army mistook which staff was which once upon a time and ever since people have been messed up. ;)