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Dbate

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I just wanted to know if others have ever had the desire to just give up on being a doctor?

After getting my most recent crop of grades, which included the lowest grade I've ever received in my entire life (a B- in physics I and a B in orgo), I am on the verge of quiting and giving up on the whole enterprise.

No, not because of my grades. I know a B- is not something that is irrecoverable, but I spent this last semester working my butt off taking Orgo and Physics. Not simply doing work, but at my university the science professors are so bad, you literally have to teach everything to yourself. This is the worst part, I had no idea how bad they would be at an Ivy. They teach NOTHING and everyone just reads the chapters to learn it themselves.

Reading and learning two chapters every week, while doing two problems sets, all my work for my other classes, serving in a leadership position in my main EC (a political non-medical one), all while also working is starting to take a drain on me. (I can't quit my job because my parents have two other children in college and cannot afford to give me any money. I had to buy all my clothes and textbooks for this semester and there is no way I could get by with out this job.)

To work until 1 am or 2 am in the morning EVERY DAY and still recieve poor grades is weathering, and I am just not sure if I can keep doing this. I've been working my ass off every since my freshman year of high school and I just don't know if I can keep it up through medical school and residency. I slept on average 5 hours a night during high school and now I get slightly more, but I cut out watching tv or doing anything besides school work and my job to get a little extra sleep. It has gotten to the point that I do not even have time to sit down and watch television. I have only sporadically watched tv ever since I started college, because I just don't have time.



I know everyone works hard and I sound like a whiner, but has there been any point where you just feel like it is not worth it to keep going on?

I've wanted to be a doctor ever since I was in kindergarten and having been working to get there since elementary school (yes, I was that person the summer after fifth grade wondering which college and medical school I would attend), and I just feel like I am burning out.

Any words of encouragement would be greatly appreciated.
 

HK35

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Really? B and a B-? people would be dying for those grades in those classes. I'm sure many people on this forum to quit the dream and not be doctors and many of them probably have in the past. It comes down to how bad you actually want it. You said you have wanted it since kindergarden so why come all this way and give up? Im sorry if this is harsh but sack up. Its not going to get any easier in medical school. My friends in medical school talk about shelf exams and the USMLE, from what I understand undergrad is nothing compared to medical school. If you cannot find the motivation or lack of a better word, balls, to keep going on than go ahead and quit, but make sure you don't regret quitting. If life was easy we would all be doctors. Think about all the kids and pre meds that would love to be in your shoes but cannot because of harsher circumstances than yours.
 

Dbate

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Really? B and a B-? people would be dying for those grades in those classes. I'm sure many people on this forum to quit the dream and not be doctors and many of them probably have in the past. It comes down to how bad you actually want it. You said you have wanted it since kindergarden so why come all this way and give up? Im sorry if this is harsh but sack up. Its not going to get any easier in medical school. My friends in medical school talk about shelf exams and the USMLE, from what I understand undergrad is nothing compared to medical school. If you cannot find the motivation or lack of a better word, balls, to keep going on than go ahead and quit, but make sure you don't regret quitting. If life was easy we would all be doctors. Think about all the kids and pre meds that would love to be in your shoes but cannot because of harsher circumstances than yours.

Bull ****, no one would die for a B and a B-. Regardless, the grades themselves are not the principal problem.

I know that the work load only gets harder and that is one of my worries. If I am staying up until 1 or 2 every night now, what will I do in medical school. I plan my entire life around work, non-stop.

It always gets worse when I come home and here about my friends who are making 3.9+ at their school, while I am struggling with a 3.25 sGPA and about a 3.5 cGPA. I don't see how I could work any harder than I already do to improve my grades and I am worried that I won't be able to get into any medical school with my grades. I don't need a prestigious school, I don't need a name school, I just want to get a MD, and that possibility seems less and less likely every semester.

Maybe I am weak or lazy or whatever, but after spending the last 19 years of my life working non-stop to be get to this school, I am approaching burnout.
 

thepoopologist

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You sound close to burn out. Time to think about ways to slim your schedule. Take less classes or cut out an EC. There's no reason to give up because of how you're feeling at a particular moment. Find a way to free up some time so your grades improve. Apply to med school and if you get in, then go.
 

Dbate

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You sound close to burn out. Time to think about ways to slim your schedule. Take less classes or cut out an EC. There's no reason to give up because of how you're feeling at a particular moment. Find a way to free up some time so your grades improve. Apply to med school and if you get in, then go.

I'm thinking of not taking the second semester of physics and instead only taking orgo and an easy science class. This would reduce my workload significantly, as physics was about 10 times harder than orgo for me personally. Right now, I am just really worried about my viability as an applicant. What medical school would accept someone with a 3.25 sGPA. And I know it is really bad to say this, but I don't want to become a DO :(
 

thepoopologist

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Loans take care of expenses in med school. Everything you do besides passing tests is optional. Anyway one step at a time right?
 

ILikeDrugs

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I'm tempted to say your whining since you mention the B- being your lowest grade, but I'll play nice since I've worked 40 hour weeks for the past ~9 years since I was 18 and can somewhat relate. ;)

If you're done with physics and o-chem, it sounds to me like your done with the pre-reqs. Maybe it's time to give yourself a break by switching to a laid back major that doesn't involve labs and lab reports. If you want to stick with a difficult science major, maybe it would be best to take on a lighter schedule. If you have to work, then you have to work. If there's a possibility to take on lighter work hours, live on a tighter budget, and still survive, then maybe you should do that. You need to lighten up on something and maybe extend the time that it'll take to reach this goal, if you really want to stick with it. Many people might not want to hear this, but it's ok to start med school as a non-trad and matriculate when your 23 or 25 or later even. Matriculating at 22 as a burn out isn't going to do you any good. It might be best to matriculate as a physically and psychologically healthy 24-year-old. Matriculating as a non burned out 21 or 22-year-old seems to be reserved for those who are well off financially, IMO. I'm sure there's really gifted 21-year-olds who take on 18 units, work full time to support themselves, and do their ECs and remain psychologically and physically healthy, but I'd bet money that they *aren't* the norm. I guess you have to ask yourself if you're that type of person or do you need to slow down somewhere?
 

thepoopologist

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I'm thinking of not taking the second semester of physics and instead only taking orgo and an easy science class. This would reduce my workload significantly, as physics was about 10 times harder than orgo for me personally. Right now, I am just really worried about my viability as an applicant. What medical school would accept someone with a 3.25 sGPA. And I know it is really bad to say this, but I don't want to become a DO :(
You're talking like the 3.25 is your final gpa. Sounds like a plan. I'd also look into taking physics at a JC and transferring it over for your BA/BS credit. An A is an A on the AMCAS. If I were an Ivy League sophomore I wouldn't be thinking about DO schools either. I'd also think about taking more of those easy science class here and there to boost that science gpa up.

Yes, and don't push yourself to burnout, because if you stay with that schedule, you are burning out sometime in undergrad or med school. A somewhat balanced life is crucial. Exercise, diet, social life, blah, blah, blah...
 
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Dbate

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I'm tempted to say your whining since you mention the B- being your lowest grade, but I'll play nice since I've worked 40 hour weeks for the past ~9 years since I was 18 and can somewhat relate. ;)

I don't work that much, only about 8 hours a week, but given the workload it would border on being academic suicide to take on any more work. The girl who had my job before me had to quit because the 8 hours were too much.

If you're done with physics and o-chem, it sounds to me like your done with the pre-reqs. Maybe it's time to give yourself a break by switching to a laid back major that doesn't involve labs and lab reports.

Unfortunately, I am not done. I still have to take the second semester of both orgo and physics. I also have to take bio lab, orgo lab, and physics lab. But after those, I will have completed all my science requirements, although I am going to take physiology and biochemistry to prep for the MCAT.

Also, I'm a political science major (can't get easier than that), but all my classes so far except for 3 or 5 have been pre-med science classes.



"I'm sure there's really gifted 21-year-olds who take on 18 units, work full time to support themselves, and do their ECs and remain psychologically and physically healthy, but I'd bet money that they *aren't* the norm. I guess you have to ask yourself if you're that type of person or do you need to slow down somewhere?

I definitely need to slow down.
 

ILikeDrugs

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What?! 8 hours a week, brah? Political science major? Tell me you're taking 25 units and not 15? I think you need some better studying habits and stress management skills. You shouldn't be burnt out with an 8-hour half-part-time job and 15 units. You lost my sympathy if that's your case. ;)

Get better study, time management, and stress management skills. :thumbup:

I'll also add that physiology and biochem aren't really necessary. I took physio and can say that the material needed for the MCAT is much less than what is taught in physio. The material in the prep books EK and TBR is sufficient. I opted out a biochem because it seemed that I covered all the amcas bio topics (from the amcas bio topic pdf) in bio I/II and genetics. Taking biochem would've been overkill.

:luck:
 
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circulus vitios

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No, not because of my grades. I know a B- is not something that is irrecoverable, but I spent this last semester working my butt off taking Orgo and Physics. Not simply doing work, but at my university the science professors are so bad, you literally have to teach everything to yourself. This is the worst part, I had no idea how bad they would be at an Ivy. They teach NOTHING and everyone just reads the chapters to learn it themselves.

I got a B- in organic because my "professor" is like you described. He regurgitates slides which aren't even his, never does any example problems, gives impossible exams, doesn't follow the syllabus, doesn't help in lab, etc. My solution to getting over it was to stop caring. Organic I and II are only two classes. Do well on your other classes and no one will care.

As for the money issues I don't know what to say. Maybe transfer to a state university if that's any cheaper?
 

circulus vitios

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WHY WOULD ANYONE TRANSFER FROM YALE TO STATE U? :eek:

Slowly kill yourself and be a status ***** vs have some fun and get a good education at a good state school. What a tough choice.
 

docelh

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Slowly kill yourself and be a status ***** vs have some fun and get a good education at a good state school. What a tough choice.

Slowly get real with yourself. your advice generally sucks, and your attitude is worse.

OP, transferring from Yale to State U will only transmit the message to medical ad comms that you gave up and can't hack it.
 

circulus vitios

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Slowly get real with yourself. your advice generally sucks, and your attitude is worse.

OP, transferring from Yale to State U will only transmit the message to medical ad comms that you gave up and can't hack it.

A pre-med speaking for a medical admissions committee? Now I've seen everything.
 

alwaysaangel

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This is the worst part, I had no idea how bad they would be at an Ivy. They teach NOTHING and everyone just reads the chapters to learn it themselves.

This is most colleges. You're not in high school anymore. The primary purpose of college is not to learn what you need to be a doctor or whatever you want to be when you grow up. Its to learn how to learn.

You need to find the study style that works for you ASAP because its only going to get worse from here - med school teaches you even less and expects you to learn more on your own.

As far as whether its worth it or not, it sounds like you need to reexamine your priorities and values. Why do you really want to be a doctor? Because it sounded cool since you were 6 years old and you've just been obsessed with that since then? Because you really want to be a physician? Try taking a step back and really evaluating what else might make you happy and where you should go.

Medicine isn't for everyone, and to be completely honest - people who breeze through undergrad often burn out in medical school...and you're already burnt out.

The biggest thing to keep in mind is that medicine is NOT a 4 year commitment with 3-5 years of residency that somehow leads to a better life... It is a lifelong commitment to learning and working your ass off constantly. Often the rewards aren't worth the work. If you aren't enjoying the subject matter, challenge and workload now then you will likely really hate it in 4 years.
 

dbeast

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I'm tempted to say your whining since you mention the B- being your lowest grade, but I'll play nice since I've worked 40 hour weeks for the past ~9 years since I was 18 and can somewhat relate. ;)

If you're done with physics and o-chem, it sounds to me like your done with the pre-reqs. Maybe it's time to give yourself a break by switching to a laid back major that doesn't involve labs and lab reports. If you want to stick with a difficult science major, maybe it would be best to take on a lighter schedule. If you have to work, then you have to work. If there's a possibility to take on lighter work hours, live on a tighter budget, and still survive, then maybe you should do that. You need to lighten up on something and maybe extend the time that it'll take to reach this goal, if you really want to stick with it. Many people might not want to hear this, but it's ok to start med school as a non-trad and matriculate when your 23 or 25 or later even. Matriculating at 22 as a burn out isn't going to do you any good. It might be best to matriculate as a physically and psychologically healthy 24-year-old. Matriculating as a non burned out 21 or 22-year-old seems to be reserved for those who are well off financially, IMO. I'm sure there's really gifted 21-year-olds who take on 18 units, work full time to support themselves, and do their ECs and remain psychologically and physically healthy, but I'd bet money that they *aren't* the norm. I guess you have to ask yourself if you're that type of person or do you need to slow down somewhere?

:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup: x10000

Slow down and take some time off after graduation. That simple. In fact, you can get a full-time job during that year or two off which will both strengthen your application AND make some money!!! The average age for med school matriculants is 25.

Btw, if you can afford all your textbooks and clothes on a 8 hours/week job, please share with us. I want that.
 
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