Status
Not open for further replies.

Sarikate

Full of antioxidants
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2004
663
1
42
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Was just diagnosed with this. It SUCKS. My heart beat tops 180 at rest sometimes, go to the bathroom 20 times a day, and I've lost 20 pounds (okay, don't mind that so much). My TSH is undetectable, I can't sleep, and I'm a nervous wreck.

Seeing an endocrinologist on the 9th. Anyone else have this crap?
 

CTrainSJU

MS I
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Feb 2, 2007
277
0
Des Moines
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
Was just diagnosed with this. It SUCKS. My heart beat tops 180 at rest sometimes, go to the bathroom 20 times a day, and I've lost 20 pounds (okay, don't mind that so much). My TSH is undetectable, I can't sleep, and I'm a nervous wreck.

Seeing an endocrinologist on the 9th. Anyone else have this crap?
Any treatments?
 

southpawcannon

Full Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Dec 15, 2006
296
10
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
Was just diagnosed with this. It SUCKS. My heart beat tops 180 at rest sometimes, go to the bathroom 20 times a day, and I've lost 20 pounds (okay, don't mind that so much). My TSH is undetectable, I can't sleep, and I'm a nervous wreck.

Seeing an endocrinologist on the 9th. Anyone else have this crap?

Damn.
 
About the Ads

sistermike

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Apr 6, 2002
341
0
Status (Visible)
Was just diagnosed with this. It SUCKS. My heart beat tops 180 at rest sometimes, go to the bathroom 20 times a day, and I've lost 20 pounds (okay, don't mind that so much). My TSH is undetectable, I can't sleep, and I'm a nervous wreck.

Seeing an endocrinologist on the 9th. Anyone else have this crap?


My mother was diagnosed with Graves Disease in the late 1980's. She had a complete thyroidectomy, and stopped taking her Thyroxin nearly 8 years ago. Her doctors said that ectopic thyroid glands took over the production of her thyroid hormone.

She experiences the same symptoms as you. Her heart rate will go out of control while at rest, and she is quite slim (weighhs around 105 and is around 5'6"). I dunno if they explained to you why your TSH is low, but it is low (in your case, undetectable) because your thyroid is producing so much TH (T3 and T4) that it has sort of a "negative feedback" effect on your TSH. There is so much TH in the body that there is no point for the production of TSH.

Did they talk to you about anti-thyroid drugs? I think a common one is Methimazole.

With time you will adjust to the changes. My mother is able to eat anything she wants and never gains a pound. Haha..
 

Sarikate

Full of antioxidants
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2004
663
1
42
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
My options:

1) Radioactive iodine. Take this, it kills off your thyroid completely, in which case you need to be on synthetic thyroid hormones for the rest of your life, which can also wreak havoc on your system.

2) Anti-thyroid drugs like PTU or methimazole. Can cause low white count, liver disease, a whole bunch of other crap, and your hyperthyroidism can always come back, necessitating some other treatment.

3) Thyroidectomy. Also will generally cause your thyroid to go bye-bye. Synthetic hormones almost always needed, and you are risking other problems if they accidentally remove your parathyroid glands.

I could not treat it, but would risk heart failure, osteoporosis, and a bunch of other not-very-pleasant effects, in addition to living symptomatically, which is NO FUN (other than being able to eat whatever I want, HA!).

I am just annoyed that I have to contend with this, in addition to the added stress of starting med school in six months, although I know it could be much worse...I really have to just stop whining about it!
 

DoctorMom78

Sky Glory
10+ Year Member
Sep 28, 2006
3,193
3
43
Speedwell, TN
www.myspace.com
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
:( So sorry to hear that. My mother has Hashimoto's which is hypothyroidism, so she has the opposite symptoms you do. She takes synthroid and it has completely regulated everything for her. I know that it is added stress, but I am sure that you can overcome it. There are a lot of people that have to deal with medical conditions and medical school (myself included). If you see the right doctor and get on the right medication, I am sure you will be fine. There is no magic cure and there is no way to make something like this go away. You just have to be strong and take care of yourself the best that you can. PM or IM me if you want to chat or for support. :) :love: :luck:
 

Kuba

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Mar 19, 2006
3,015
11
36
NYC
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
sorry to hear your about your diagnosis. what doesn't kill you makes you stronger, right?

have a feeling a Mod is going to shut this down for violating TOS..
 

DrHoffy

Member
15+ Year Member
Jan 26, 2005
174
1
Detroit!
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
Sarikate,
I was diagnosed with Hashimoto's about 4 years ago. Being Hypothyroid has presented some interesting challenges (when my dosage of synthroid isn't right), but just like being diabetic it is manageable. Since the majority of treatments (if you choose to be treated) for Graves essentialy make you hypothyroid I just wanted you to know it is not all bad, mostly just an inconvienence. :)



If you want to talk more about this, PM me.
Marcia
 

MaximusD

Anatomically Incorrect
10+ Year Member
Aug 8, 2006
5,183
396
State of Delirium
www.lmgtfy.com
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
sorry to hear your about your diagnosis. what doesn't kill you makes you stronger, right?

have a feeling a Mod is going to shut this down for violating TOS..

doubtful, you are allowed to discuss your own medical issues but you aren't allowed to ask for medical advice. It didnt' seem as though that was the goal of the OP.
 

Kateb4

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Nov 28, 2006
871
2
Chicagoland
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
My options:

1) Radioactive iodine. Take this, it kills off your thyroid completely, in which case you need to be on synthetic thyroid hormones for the rest of your life, which can also wreak havoc on your system.

2) Anti-thyroid drugs like PTU or methimazole. Can cause low white count, liver disease, a whole bunch of other crap, and your hyperthyroidism can always come back, necessitating some other treatment.

3) Thyroidectomy. Also will generally cause your thyroid to go bye-bye. Synthetic hormones almost always needed, and you are risking other problems if they accidentally remove your parathyroid glands.

I could not treat it, but would risk heart failure, osteoporosis, and a bunch of other not-very-pleasant effects, in addition to living symptomatically, which is NO FUN (other than being able to eat whatever I want, HA!).

I am just annoyed that I have to contend with this, in addition to the added stress of starting med school in six months, although I know it could be much worse...I really have to just stop whining about it!

Hey Sarikate,

I was diagnosed with thyroid cancer 10 years ago, and had similar symptoms (I was really hyperthyroid also). It does get better, but will take some time. First, the RAI will not completely kill off your thyroid, they usually give a measured dose to partially damage the thyroid with a goal of decreased hormone production. This is a really safe treatment, and there aren't really horrible side effects. I was given it after my thyroidectomy for complete ablation, but the theraputic treatment would be about the same. Inpatient, since you will be hot for a few days, you get a measured dose and are isolated until your radiation levels are neglegable. The I-131 passes in bodily fluids after a few days, and the only side effect that I had was swollen salivary glands. I was able to have kids, and have had no recurrence yet. I know a couple of people who were hyperthyroid for various reasons that were treated this way with wonderful results. Of course, there is always a chance of recurrence if you still have a thyroid.

The anti-thyroid drugs are also a good option, but you already listed the negatives. Also, if you are female and plan to ever become pregnant, these meds can be a major issue. (well, conceiving itself will be a major issue anyways if you have thyroid issues, but that's another story)

I would think that thyroidectomy would be a last resort if the above treatments didn't work out for you. The synthetic thyroid hormones are not a bad treatment, but like you said, the surgery has potential risk to damaging the parathyroid, as well as possible nerve damage and swallowing/speech issues. I had mine done 10 years ago with no complications, so it is possible if you find a good surgeon. Actually I had mine done in two surgeries (partial and then complete) and I'm still fine.

Anyways, try not to stress, I know it's hard when you are so hyperthyroid, but this is not the worst diagnosis that you could get, and it's a really treatable disease. Feel free to PM me if you want to talk, and best of luck with your endo appt!
 

Sarikate

Full of antioxidants
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2004
663
1
42
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Hey, thanks for all the supportive responses, guys. NO, I am most certainly not looking for medical advice (especially not from a gaggle of pre-meds, LOL). I was just having a moment. It is certainly not the end of the world by any stretch of the imagination. It was interesting to hear of many of your stories and they did make me feel better. Rock on!
 

DrZeke

yzarc gniog ylwolS
15+ Year Member
Apr 25, 2005
2,692
608
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
*sigh*

Not to be a complete troll, but Graves disease is an autoimmune disease where the immune system begins producing antibodies that mimic the action of TSH! This causes a positive feedback effect and increases/causes production of T3 and T4. Naturally, the high amount of T3 and T4 signals to the hypothalamus to stop producing TRH which normally causes production and release of TSH. Since it is not TSH that is acting to stimulate production of T3 and T4 (which are the main effectors here causing all those symptoms...) the feedback loop cannot help and the production of T3 and T4 does not stop. Since the feedback looop is still ACTING on TSH, even though it's not responsible for all this production of T3 and T4, TSH levels go down to the point where they are undetectable.

You would think people who consider themselves "pre-med" would know anything about this or their own disease...
 

DrZeke

yzarc gniog ylwolS
15+ Year Member
Apr 25, 2005
2,692
608
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
OMFG WOW

Not to be a complete troll, but I a lowly pre-med with a masters knows that Graves disease is an autoimmune disease where the immune system begins producing antibodies that mimic the action of TSH! This causes a positive feedback effect and increases/causes production of T3 and T4. Naturally, the high amount of T3 and T4 signals to the hypothalamus to stop producing TRH which normally causes production and release of TSH. Since it is not TSH that is acting to stimulate production of T3 and T4 (which are the main effectors here causing all those symptoms...) the feedback loop cannot help and the production of T3 and T4 does not stop. Since the feedback looop is still ACTING on TSH, even though it's not responsible for all this production of T3 and T4, TSH levels go down to the point where they are undetectable.

You would think people who consider themselves "pre-med" would know anything about this or their own disease...
Oh yeah, and my mom ALSO has graves disease...

Sorry guys, but some of your responses or reasoning was just downright wrong. And what is the problem with taking radioactive iodine?? You won't die without a thyroid and the radioactive iodine can only cause thyroid cancer if any kind of cancer...
 
About the Ads

AAhopeful

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Jan 31, 2007
22
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
You would think people who consider themselves "pre-med" would know anything about this or their own disease...

Actually I choose not to make any knowledge concrete when it comes to medicine. If it was my own disease I would find out all the information I could but other than that I try not to learn too much before I actually get to med-school. Just like this instance, it can be complicated and I would rather learn it from a doctor and the correct way than from some internet site.
 

Lfribble

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 14, 2007
201
0
Erie, PA
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
You would think people who consider themselves "pre-med" would know anything about this or their own disease...

Crap- guess I'm in trouble. I didn't know we were supposed to enter medical school already knowing everything....
 

DoctorMom78

Sky Glory
10+ Year Member
Sep 28, 2006
3,193
3
43
Speedwell, TN
www.myspace.com
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
*sigh*

Not to be a complete troll, but Graves disease is an autoimmune disease where the immune system begins producing antibodies that mimic the action of TSH!

Well....I wouldn't say that "mimic" is the correct word.:rolleyes: The body does produce autoantibodies against the TSH receptors. They do not really "mimic" the action, but rather act as an agonist triggering a cascade of inflammatory immune responses as well as altering the production of TSH, T3, and T4. There are actually three types of receptor antibodies: TSI, TGI, and TBII. The first one activates the receptors more slowly than TSH does, which leads to an elevated production of thyroid hormone. The second one binds directly to the TSH receptor. The third one inhibits the normal binding of TSH with its receptor. So, as you can see, "mimic" is really not the correct terminology.:smuggrin:

Anway...the correct medical terminology and understanding of the condition is not really the point of this thread. It was started by the OP to find some support for their newly diagnosed condition. I am sure that we will all be educated on the nuances of Graves and other autoimmune diseases once we start medical school.:) ;) :thumbup:
 

It'sElectric

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Dec 5, 2005
1,501
6
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
*sigh*

Not to be a complete troll, but Graves disease is an autoimmune disease where the immune system begins producing antibodies that mimic the action of TSH! This causes a positive feedback effect and increases/causes production of T3 and T4. Naturally, the high amount of T3 and T4 signals to the hypothalamus to stop producing TRH which normally causes production and release of TSH. Since it is not TSH that is acting to stimulate production of T3 and T4 (which are the main effectors here causing all those symptoms...) the feedback loop cannot help and the production of T3 and T4 does not stop. Since the feedback looop is still ACTING on TSH, even though it's not responsible for all this production of T3 and T4, TSH levels go down to the point where they are undetectable.

You would think people who consider themselves "pre-med" would know anything about this or their own disease...


Haha.....what a snob.
 

Doctor Bagel

so cheap and juicy
Moderator Emeritus
15+ Year Member
Sep 26, 2002
10,910
1,148
from the ministry of information
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
*sigh*

Not to be a complete troll, but Graves disease is an autoimmune disease where the immune system begins producing antibodies that mimic the action of TSH! This causes a positive feedback effect and increases/causes production of T3 and T4. Naturally, the high amount of T3 and T4 signals to the hypothalamus to stop producing TRH which normally causes production and release of TSH. Since it is not TSH that is acting to stimulate production of T3 and T4 (which are the main effectors here causing all those symptoms...) the feedback loop cannot help and the production of T3 and T4 does not stop. Since the feedback looop is still ACTING on TSH, even though it's not responsible for all this production of T3 and T4, TSH levels go down to the point where they are undetectable.

You would think people who consider themselves "pre-med" would know anything about this or their own disease...

Wow, you're smart. :rolleyes: You'll get that one whole question about this right on your MS1 biochem exam.
 

DrZeke

yzarc gniog ylwolS
15+ Year Member
Apr 25, 2005
2,692
608
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
1)Well, based on the level of understanding on this thread, I wasn't sure it was ok to use certain terminology that was not in "layman's terms".

2) I don't care about some exam.

3) The OP is discussing their options on here and seems to be concerned and wanted to discuss something...so, just giving my 2 cents. Obviously nobody cares so I'll shuddup now.
 

Dr.Inviz

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Oct 1, 2006
2,422
1
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
*sigh*

Not to be a complete troll, but Graves disease is an autoimmune disease where the immune system begins producing antibodies that mimic the action of TSH! This causes a positive feedback effect and increases/causes production of T3 and T4. Naturally, the high amount of T3 and T4 signals to the hypothalamus to stop producing TRH which normally causes production and release of TSH. Since it is not TSH that is acting to stimulate production of T3 and T4 (which are the main effectors here causing all those symptoms...) the feedback loop cannot help and the production of T3 and T4 does not stop. Since the feedback looop is still ACTING on TSH, even though it's not responsible for all this production of T3 and T4, TSH levels go down to the point where they are undetectable.

You would think people who consider themselves "pre-med" would know anything about this or their own disease...

Wikipedia does a pre-med good. :smuggrin:
 

Dr.Inviz

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Oct 1, 2006
2,422
1
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
1)Well, based on the level of understanding on this thread, I wasn't sure it was ok to use certain terminology that was not in "layman's terms".

2) I don't care about some exam.

3) The OP is discussing their options on here and seems to be concerned and wanted to discuss something...so, just giving my 2 cents. Obviously nobody cares so I'll shuddup now.


I concur, it did look like the OP was being attacked and given false reasonings.
 

Kateb4

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Nov 28, 2006
871
2
Chicagoland
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
*sigh*

Not to be a complete troll, but Graves disease is an autoimmune disease where the immune system begins producing antibodies that mimic the action of TSH! This causes a positive feedback effect and increases/causes production of T3 and T4. Naturally, the high amount of T3 and T4 signals to the hypothalamus to stop producing TRH which normally causes production and release of TSH. Since it is not TSH that is acting to stimulate production of T3 and T4 (which are the main effectors here causing all those symptoms...) the feedback loop cannot help and the production of T3 and T4 does not stop. Since the feedback looop is still ACTING on TSH, even though it's not responsible for all this production of T3 and T4, TSH levels go down to the point where they are undetectable.

You would think people who consider themselves "pre-med" would know anything about this or their own disease...

Nobody here posted any mechanisms trying to explain Graves Disease, and nobody said that they had graves disease. The OP was looking for support and presented her treatment options. Many people gave their personal experiences, and gave information on the treatment options that the OP posted. Nobody claimed to be an endocrinologist, and quite honestly, I'm not even sure who you are even attacking?

Oh yeah, and my mom ALSO has graves disease...

Sorry guys, but some of your responses or reasoning was just downright wrong. And what is the problem with taking radioactive iodine?? You won't die without a thyroid and the radioactive iodine can only cause thyroid cancer if any kind of cancer...

Also, studies have NOT shown that I-131 increases the chance of thyroid cancer over time.
 

thoredius

OMS III
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 27, 2006
32
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
sorry to hear your about your diagnosis. what doesn't kill you makes you stronger, right?

have a feeling a Mod is going to shut this down for violating TOS..


Yeah, My HIPAA alarm was going off!
 
About the Ads
Status
Not open for further replies.