Jay2910

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Hey everyone,

So I am in LECOM Bradenton and its been very very rough first month of school. We are doing Anatomy for the first 8 weeks lecture/PBL style in which the professor goes over the slides and you have to figure out what to read by yourself or within your group or with a study partner.

My group tends to gossip a lot, and so far the study partners that I have gotten are pretty crappy. They keep making me come to school and they end up doing something else than what we agreed on( ex: Facebook, family event, another topic). They are suggesting study partners for active recall purposes.
I talked to my professor about the study partner problem and he says that I have to go find a good one( much easier said than done).
He says that I should be reviewing all of the slides atleast 3 times before the test . .which I do. I take a ton of notes, most of our classes are from 8-5 . . .so I study from like 5:30-11. Weekends is usually from 9-11pm. I record the lectures, relisten to them cause the prof mumbles quite a lot and make flashcards, take notes on powerpoint. I use ANKI for the flashcards for my active recall. I think I have a problem spatially correlating the text that I memorize . . .suggestions?

I've gotten an F on my first quiz and F on the first exam.

Any honest good advice that you guys have for me would be much appreciated as I want to do better and I don't want to have to remediate this course and I don't want to get kicked out of school.
 
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Hey everyone,

So I am in LECOM Bradenton and its been very very rough first month of school. We are doing Anatomy for the first 8 weeks lecture/PBL style in which the professor goes over the slides and you have to figure out what to read by yourself or within your group or with a study partner.

My group tends to gossip a lot, and so far the study partners that I have gotten are pretty crappy. They keep making me come to school and they end up doing something else than what we agreed on( ex: Facebook, family event, another topic). They are suggesting study partners for active recall purposes.
I talked to my professor about the study partner problem and he says that I have to go find a good one( much easier said than done).
He says that I should be reviewing all of the slides atleast 3 times before the test . .which I do. I take a ton of notes, most of our classes are from 8-5 . . .so I study from like 5:30-11. Weekends is usually from 9-11pm. I record the lectures, relisten to them cause the prof mumbles quite a lot and make flashcards, take notes on powerpoint. I use ANKI for the flashcards for my active recall. I think I have a problem spatially correlating the text that I memorize . . .suggestions?

I've gotten an F on my first quiz and F on the first exam.

Any honest good advice that you guys have for me would be much appreciated as I want to do better and I don't want to have to remediate this course and I don't want to get kicked out of school.
That is why I declined LECOM and went to a school with a didactic curriculum like AZCOM, I did not have to show up at lecture, only had to come to labs like anatomy and OMM, studied at home, ignored my classmates, played Call of Duty in my free time in my apartment, did really well.

People in medical school are not like undergrad, they are not your friends, they can and will stab you in the back, also people in administration are people you cannot trust at all either, they are not your friends.
 

Jay2910

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That is why I declined LECOM and went to a school with a didactic curriculum like AZCOM, I did not have to show up at lecture, only had to come to labs like anatomy and OMM, studied at home, ignored my classmates, played Call of Duty in my free time in my apartment, did really well.

People in medical school are not like undergrad, they are not your friends, they can and will stab you in the back, also people in administration are people you cannot trust at all either, they are not your friends.
Yeah well now I am stuck in this situation . .. what can or should I do?
 
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OP, something is wrong if you are spending that much time studying and still doing poorly on exams. You need to figure out what you're missing. You obviously aren't studying the right material or you aren't studying it in the right way to retain it.

Don't be afraid to completely change and abandon your current study methods. They aren't working, so it can't hurt to try something new. Now that you've had one exam, you know the types of questions that are asked, what the professors think is important, what areas you should focus on, and what you didn't study will enough. From that you should be able to see how you need to change your study habits. Do you just need to read more, do you need to go over the lectures more closely or abandon reviewing them completely, do you need to focus more on clinical or "big picture" concepts or do you need to buckle down and memorize origin, insertion, innervation, action over and over again? These are all questions you should be asking yourself and adjust your studying accordingly.

Also, don't be afraid to ask for a tutor or for help. That's what those resources are for. It's better you ask now before you get another failing exam score.

As far a study partners go, I hate to reiterate your admin, but you need to find more dedicated studiers, or you just need to study on your own. Find people doing well in the class and ask if you can study with them. If you can't do that, study by yourself and tell your partners you're busy.

Just work hard, and you should find something that works. We've all had to completely change our study habits for med school, and we've all been afraid of failing out, just because of the sheer volume of the material. You can get through it.

That is why I declined LECOM and went to a school with a didactic curriculum like AZCOM, I did not have to show up at lecture, only had to come to labs like anatomy and OMM, studied at home, ignored my classmates, played Call of Duty in my free time in my apartment, did really well.

People in medical school are not like undergrad, they are not your friends, they can and will stab you in the back, also people in administration are people you cannot trust at all either, they are not your friends.
That's a pretty jaded view of everything. While I agree you can't always rely on people to have your best interests at heart, not all classmates are out to stab you in the back, in fact most are too busy with themselves and their own problems to even pay attention to you. In any case, I'm glad I don't attend a school with classmates like you describe.
 
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Yeah well now I am stuck in this situation . .. what can or should I do?
Contact academic support services quickly. That being said this is the reason why I think PBL is not a good curriculum for many students particularly those who do not have a science background, did have research background or some kind of postgraduate study. Its does not have enough structure like a didactic curriculum.
 
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Pisiform

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We never used to study in those Anatomy group sessions. Everyone studies on their own. We just make some ppt and go over it quickly so we could go home and study.
 

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OP, something is wrong if you are spending that much time studying and still doing poorly on exams. You need to figure out what you're missing. You obviously aren't studying the right material or you aren't studying it in the right way to retain it.

Don't be afraid to completely change and abandon your current study methods. They aren't working, so it can't hurt to try something new. Now that you've had one exam, you know the types of questions that are asked, what the professors think is important, what areas you should focus on, and what you didn't study will enough. From that you should be able to see how you need to change your study habits. Do you just need to read more, do you need to go over the lectures more closely or abandon reviewing them completely, do you need to focus more on clinical or "big picture" concepts or do you need to buckle down and memorize origin, insertion, innervation, action over and over again? These are all questions you should be asking yourself and adjust your studying accordingly.

Also, don't be afraid to ask for a tutor or for help. That's what those resources are for. It's better you ask now before you get another failing exam score.

As far a study partners go, I hate to reiterate your admin, but you need to find more dedicated studiers, or you just need to study on your own. Find people doing well in the class and ask if you can study with them. If you can't do that, study by yourself and tell your partners you're busy.

Just work hard, and you should find something that works. We've all had to completely change our study habits for med school, and we've all been afraid of failing out, just because of the sheer volume of the material. You can get through it.
As usual, I agree with hallowman. The PBL-style anatomy is brutal, but you'll get through it. Do you have actual anatomy lectures down there?

Ask your faculty for help-- at Seton Hill I know they do want us to succeed, and I'm sure that's true at Bradenton as well.
Find new study partners, or at least ditch the ones you have. You're stuck with your lab group, but you can find other people who want to study together. Do as many BRS and the green Gray's Review book as you possibly can. And if anxiety is an issue, get help sooner rather than later.

That is why I declined LECOM and went to a school with a didactic curriculum like AZCOM, I did not have to show up at lecture, only had to come to labs like anatomy and OMM, studied at home, ignored my classmates, played Call of Duty in my free time in my apartment, did really well.

People in medical school are not like undergrad, they are not your friends, they can and will stab you in the back, also people in administration are people you cannot trust at all either, they are not your friends.
While I'll admit to not being a fan of LECOM's anatomy curriculum, your posts often make me relieved I didn't pick AZCOM. I have a few classmates I'm not a fan of, but most of the people I meet are actually friendly and backstabbing isn't something I worry about.
 
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yanks26dmb

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That is why I declined LECOM and went to a school with a didactic curriculum like AZCOM, I did not have to show up at lecture, only had to come to labs like anatomy and OMM, studied at home, ignored my classmates, played Call of Duty in my free time in my apartment, did really well.

People in medical school are not like undergrad, they are not your friends, they can and will stab you in the back, also people in administration are people you cannot trust at all either, they are not your friends.

you are one bitter dude. my med school class couldn't be further opposite than what described. perhaps the problem isn't other people, but you? not trying to be argumentative, but I do think it's something worth considering.
 

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That is why I declined LECOM and went to a school with a didactic curriculum like AZCOM, I did not have to show up at lecture, only had to come to labs like anatomy and OMM, studied at home, ignored my classmates, played Call of Duty in my free time in my apartment, did really well.

People in medical school are not like undergrad, they are not your friends, they can and will stab you in the back, also people in administration are people you cannot trust at all either, they are not your friends.
I actually agree a bit with this part.
 
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you are one bitter dude. my med school class couldn't be further opposite than what described. perhaps the problem isn't other people, but you? not trying to be argumentative, but I do think it's something worth considering.
Do you go to LECOM? I thought you went somewhere else. The way people act to your face is different from how they behave when your back is turned or when you are not around in your presence, and its particularly so in medical school, you have a lot to learn, you have only been in school for a couple of weeks so you know absolutely nothing, wait until a couple of years when you start the lottery for rotation spots and your classmates true colors will shine through.

Don't confuse your classmates' friendliness with them trusting you, those are two very different things, its also the same with faculty and also the admin folks, they also might appear friendly to you, but the trust thing, you really do not know for sure, these folks ain't your family. Be nice to them and treat them with respect and keep certain boundaries with them for your own sake, I am just giving you some good advice.

The kind of social scene you experienced as a high school student and as an undergraduate in college was a lot more relaxed and judgmental than that what you will find in medical school. You are now under a microscope and yes, people may appear friendly...initially, but be wary of boundaries with people and be aware of what you say with them and how you act. Having platonic friendships with your classmates is perfectly fine in my book but having romantic relationships in my opinion can backfire very badly, this is quite true if the relationship fails while you are in school. Also avoid discussion of matters like religion, politics, and sexuality with people in school, its not just not a good idea, because you have no idea as to how they will react and how their perception of you will change. I can tell you that people tend to be pretty chill and friendly first year but later on things change and in particular when students start competing for rotation spots you will see people's real colors.

Expect the unexpected.
 
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To answer the original question, there's a fine line between passive learning (reading/listening) and active learning (actually doing/making up and answering questions). Active learning is where most of your actual study time should be, but this is the most strenuous way to learn (prepare for some headaches). A lot of people back away from this initially and hide behind flashcards or books without actually testing their knowledge until it is too late.

Active learning makes your understanding of the material flexible, and allows you to use that knowledge to better answer questions no matter how it is asked. Rote memorization might not be enough to give you that word recognition you might have been betting on for the test, but something learned actively would do better when you need to recall it.

Ask yourself questions, and for example, pull some parts out of the system you are learning then ask yourself some question again about the system you are learning. Link it up to other stuff, how does the histology slides match up to the fascia and layers of adipose tissues you've been tearing through in lab? Bring those questions to your professors (if your school has an open door policy) and to the right classmates and see their responses and get their perspective; maybe you missed something. More heads are certainly better than one when it comes to this. Exam 1 will certainly straighten out some of the people there that are there for gossiping.
 
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As usual, I agree with hallowman. The PBL-style anatomy is brutal, but you'll get through it. Do you have actual anatomy lectures down there?

Ask your faculty for help-- at Seton Hill I know they do want us to succeed, and I'm sure that's true at Bradenton as well.
Find new study partners, or at least ditch the ones you have. You're stuck with your lab group, but you can find other people who want to study together. Do as many BRS and the green Gray's Review book as you possibly can. And if anxiety is an issue, get help sooner rather than later.



While I'll admit to not being a fan of LECOM's anatomy curriculum, your posts often make me relieved I didn't pick AZCOM. I have a few classmates I'm not a fan of, but most of the people I meet are actually friendly and backstabbing isn't something I worry about.
People at AZCOM are actually nice, they are not out to get you at all, just as long as you keep and maintain certain boundaries with people, you will be fine, there are some people that expect medical school to be like undergrad, it ain't like that at all, you need to be mindful of your behavior and what you say to people a lot more than when you were in college. I have had knowledge of AZCOM students collaborating with administrators against students whom they had a beef with for various reasons, like an ex girlfriend angry at some guy.
 

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Do you go to LECOM? I thought you went somewhere else. The way people act to your face is different from how they behave when your back is turned or when you are not around in your presence, and its particularly so in medical school, you have a lot to learn, you have only been in school for a couple of weeks so you know absolutely nothing, wait until a couple of years when you start the lottery for rotation spots and your classmates true colors will shine through.

Don't confuse your classmates' friendliness with them trusting you, those are two very different things, its also the same with faculty and also the admin folks, they also might appear friendly to you, but the trust thing, you really do not know for sure, these folks ain't your family. Be nice to them and treat them with respect and keep certain boundaries with them for your own sake, I am just giving you some good advice.

The kind of social scene you experienced as a high school student and as an undergraduate in college was a lot more relaxed and judgmental than that what you will find in medical school. You are now under a microscope and yes, people may appear friendly...initially, but be wary of boundaries with people and be aware of what you say with them and how you act. Having platonic friendships with your classmates is perfectly fine in my book but having romantic relationships in my opinion can backfire very badly, this is quite true if the relationship fails while you are in school. Also avoid discussion of matters like religion, politics, and sexuality with people in school, its not just not a good idea, because you have no idea as to how they will react and how their perception of you will change. I can tell you that people tend to be pretty chill and friendly first year but later on things change and in particular when students start competing for rotation spots you will see people's real colors.

Expect the unexpected.
And this is why I think being a married 30 year old non trad with 7 years of real world, at times cut throat, business experience is beyond useful.
 
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And this is why I think being a married 30 year old non trad with 7 years of real world, at times cut throat, business experience is beyond useful.
I kind of wish had I had more real world experience considering our ages are the same. However, as a graduate student your not as safe from the internal politics like in undergrad. So I did gain quite a bit from it and yes Seth Joo is correct in saying don't be too trusting of faculty members (they care far more about their own hide than yours).
 
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I kind of wish had I had more real world experience considering our ages are the same. However, as a graduate student your not as safe from the internal politics like in undergrad. So I did gain quite a bit from it and yes Seth Joo is correct in saying don't be too trusting of faculty members (they care far more about their own hide than yours).
Thank you, its actually true, faculty are not your friends, most people already know not to trust the administration, like the Deans, but the faculty also will save their own hides if its them versus you. At some smaller schools students get fooled into thinking of their professors as their friends.
 
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Go see your school's learning or education center and get help with study tips./techniques/styles etc.

Make use of all anatomy faculty to determine what is your weakest area.

Get new study groups and partners STAT!

Hey everyone,

So I am in LECOM Bradenton and its been very very rough first month of school. We are doing Anatomy for the first 8 weeks lecture/PBL style in which the professor goes over the slides and you have to figure out what to read by yourself or within your group or with a study partner.

My group tends to gossip a lot, and so far the study partners that I have gotten are pretty crappy. They keep making me come to school and they end up doing something else than what we agreed on( ex: Facebook, family event, another topic). They are suggesting study partners for active recall purposes.
I talked to my professor about the study partner problem and he says that I have to go find a good one( much easier said than done).
He says that I should be reviewing all of the slides atleast 3 times before the test . .which I do. I take a ton of notes, most of our classes are from 8-5 . . .so I study from like 5:30-11. Weekends is usually from 9-11pm. I record the lectures, relisten to them cause the prof mumbles quite a lot and make flashcards, take notes on powerpoint. I use ANKI for the flashcards for my active recall. I think I have a problem spatially correlating the text that I memorize . . .suggestions?

I've gotten an F on my first quiz and F on the first exam.

Any honest good advice that you guys have for me would be much appreciated as I want to do better and I don't want to have to remediate this course and I don't want to get kicked out of school.

I'm glad you're not one of my students, Seth. You're going to have a tough road in med school.

Thank you, its actually true, faculty are not your friends, most people already know not to trust the administration, like the Deans, but the faculty also will save their own hides if they its them versus you. At some smaller schools students get fooled into thinking of their professors as their friends.
 
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Go see your school's learning or education center and get help with study tips./techniques/styles etc.

Make use of all anatomy faculty to determine what is your weakest area.

Get new study groups and partners STAT!




I'm glad you're not one of my students, Seth. You're going to have a tough road in med school.
Actually...everyone has a tough road in medical school.
 
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I thought Ivy League students had easy roads in med school?
Actually I have a lovely girlfriend that has provided me amazing support during my journey, much more so than my ex. Ivy League or not Medical School is tough, I described it as a boxing match.

Unfortunately the politics in graduate school tends to be more sensitive than undergrad, I don't really broadcast to people in school that I support Trump for example. Many individuals among the faculty at many schools tend to be politically left and liberal and don't take too kindly to those with opposing points of view.
 
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You are now under a microscope and yes, people may appear friendly...initially, but be wary of boundaries with people and be aware of what you say with them and how you act. Having platonic friendships with your classmates is perfectly fine in my book but having romantic relationships in my opinion can backfire very badly, this is quite true if the relationship fails while you are in school.
You sound like you learned these things the hard way, which explains your attitude
 
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You sound like you learned these things the hard way, which explains your attitude
It also explains my logic for supporting Trump, he is a tough guy, life teaches you tough lessons. If America needed a leader like that, the time is now.
 

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what I'm doing for anatomy (that is working out pretty well) is to study the material and then go sit with the cadaver and visually correlate them.

ex: I've drawn the brachial plexus a million times but it meant nothing until I was able to follow the cords to where they went.
 
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one of my professors described it perfectly. Medical school is like the tallest stack of pancakes without any syrup. Eat them one at a time don't look at the end game or you'll throw up.

take the region you're trying to learn -> learn all the muscle names -> learn all the functions of each muscle -> learn all the innervation -> learn all blood supply -> if you have time do proximal/distal attachments. (a lot of the time you can figure out what the attachments are by just knowing where they're located. unless your professors are being super specific)
 
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It also explains my logic for supporting Trump, he is a tough guy, life teaches you tough lessons. If America needed a leader like that, the time is now.
Haha I thought the avatar was a joke.... Out of all the pictures of Trump why would you choose the least flattering one?
 
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what I'm doing for anatomy (that is working out pretty well) is to study the material and then go sit with the cadaver and visually correlate them.

ex: I've drawn the brachial plexus a million times but it meant nothing until I was able to follow the cords to where they went.
The OP is going to a school where the curriculum is PBL, he is given clinical scenarios, I have heard of this method of learning, its good if the person already has a background in medical sciences but for many DO students, they will struggle. In many ways its like teaching yourself the Basic Sciences, its totally different from didactic learning where the professor gives you notes, you memorize the notes, and you consult the textbooks if you have any questions.
 
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The OP is going to a school where the curriculum is PBL, he is given clinical scenarios, I have heard of this method of learning, its good if the person already has a background in medical sciences but for many DO students, they will struggle. In many ways its like teaching yourself the Basic Sciences, its totally different from didactic learning where the professor gives you notes, you memorize the notes, and you consult the textbooks if you have any questions.
ahh haven't had any experience with PBL so didn't know they won't even be pointed in a productive direction
 

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The OP is going to a school where the curriculum is PBL, he is given clinical scenarios, I have heard of this method of learning, its good if the person already has a background in medical sciences but for many DO students, they will struggle. In many ways its like teaching yourself the Basic Sciences, its totally different from didactic learning where the professor gives you notes, you memorize the notes, and you consult the textbooks if you have any questions.
My state med school is PBL and I have friends who attend there that told me all the pros and cons of this method. What sucks about this method is the fact that you are also relying on learning from your team. Meaning if they don't pull their weight and get the facts right, you will be doing more work than you need to.
 
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Haha I thought the avatar was a joke.... Out of all the pictures of Trump why would you choose the least flattering one?
I chose the avatar because of what it is says on his hat, Trump is not some pop star type of candidate like Obama was, and thankfully that is a good thing given what an utter disaster Obama has been. Bush was horrible as well. Trump has publicly lambasted them both. Why I like him? He is the one most likely to turn America back into a job creation engine.
 
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That is why I declined LECOM and went to a school with a didactic curriculum like AZCOM, I did not have to show up at lecture, only had to come to labs like anatomy and OMM, studied at home, ignored my classmates, played Call of Duty in my free time in my apartment, did really well.

People in medical school are not like undergrad, they are not your friends, they can and will stab you in the back, also people in administration are people you cannot trust at all either, they are not your friends.
This post made lol. I agree with you as far picking a school but tuition wise it's hard to argue for AZCOM against LECOM-B. OP it seems like you need someone else who is qualified to explain medicine to you. I'm not saying your stupid at all but you need a teacher. Not everyone can open a calculus book and start deriving right away, you need a teacher to break it down and convey the pertinent information.
That is the essence of scholarship and it's the worst aspect of PBL/TBL/guided inquiry methods. So my solution : watch video lectures on the topics your studying to supplement your notes and reading. I say read a little unless and watch a little more. Pathoma, DIT, Kaplan, Dr. Najeeb, etc there's many sources with great videos to learn from.
 
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This post made lol. I agree with you as far picking a school but tuition wise it's hard to argue for AZCOM against LECOM-B. OP it seems like you need someone else who is qualified to explain medicine to you. I'm not saying your stupid at all but you need a teacher. Not everyone can open a calculus book and start deriving right away, you need a teacher to break it down and convey the pertinent information.
That is the essence of scholarship and it's the worst aspect of PBL/TBL/guided inquiry methods. So my solution : watch video lectures on the topics your studying to supplement your notes and reading. I say read a little unless and watch a little more. Pathoma, DIT, Kaplan, Dr. Najeeb, etc there's many sources with great videos to learn from.
AZCOM is expensive but you get what you pay for, AZCOM tends to provide far more resources to its to students than LECOM, its more student friendly. We do not have weird rules like forcing male students to wear shirts and ties to class for example. AZCOM also allows struggling students to decel, in other words finish the program in 5 years rather than 4.

I thought my professor's Powerpoint notes were pretty detailed and contained much of the information I needed to do well on my examinations and on the boards. PBL is a different beast, its more like studying on your own.
 

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AZCOM is expensive but you get what you pay for, AZCOM tends to provide far more resources to its to students than LECOM, its more student friendly. We do not have weird rules like forcing male students to wear shirts and ties to class for example. AZCOM also allows struggling students to decel, in other words finish the program in 5 years rather than 4.

I thought my professor's Powerpoint notes were pretty detailed and contained much of the information I needed to do well on my examinations and on the boards. PBL is a different beast, its more like studying on your own.
Your constant commenting on LECOM is a little weird. LECOM has a dresscode... big deal, lots of schools have dress codes. Also, your constant claim that AZCOM gives a ton more resources to its students than LECOM (which to begin with I don't completely buy) is a little ridiculous considering that AZCOM' s tuition is almost double that of LECOM's. I'd hope that you guys get more for that big of a bump in cost.

Not defending all of LECOM's practices, just wondering why you feel the need to bash it or compare it to your school in every other post in osteo/pre-osteo.
 
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Your constant commenting on LECOM is a little weird. LECOM has a dresscode... big deal, lots of schools have dress codes. Also, your constant claim that AZCOM gives a ton more resources to its students than LECOM (which to begin with I don't completely buy) is a little ridiculous considering that AZCOM' s tuition is almost double that of LECOM's. I'd hope that you guys get more for that big of a bump in cost.

Not defending all of LECOM's practices, just wondering why you feel the need to bash it or compare it to your school in every other post in osteo/pre-osteo.
I second this. Seth Joo, do you have a reason to hate LECOM as much as you do? While I'm not my school's biggest defender, I do feel like I'm getting a solid education. And for $60,641 vs. $31,680, I'm glad you get more bells and whistles than I do!
 
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Henry101

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If you've signed up for clubs, Facebook message upperclassmen that you know and ask for advice. You can also form study groups with people in these interest clubs. I think people that are involved in such groups tend to be more serious about their education and goal oriented. If you aren't a member of any groups, message the leadership in your school's SOMA. It's sortof their job to help students and I'm sure those in leadership can point you in some direction.
Go back and re-read your personal statement, remind yourself why you entered this field, and move forward. You can do this dude! I believe in you!
 
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I second this. Seth Joo, do you have a reason to hate LECOM as much as you do? While I'm not my school's biggest defender, I do feel like I'm getting a solid education. And for $60,641 vs. $31,680, I'm glad you get more bells and whistles than I do!
Which LECOM do you go to? The one in Florida or Erie PA? I wound up only interviewing at DO schools in the Western US, mostly because I grew up in Boston and wanted to be in a new part of the country when I was applying. Arizona is a beautiful place, and regardless of the cost, I think it was worth it, the school provides me with an excellent education and top of the line facilities, plus I do not miss the cold weather in Boston at all, my hometown is not a DO friendly city, its not a even a heart breaker because I have no plans on going back there to practice.
 

ortnakas

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Which LECOM do you go to? The one in Florida or Erie PA? I wound up only interviewing at DO schools in the Western US, mostly because I grew up in Boston and wanted to be in a new part of the country when I was applying. Arizona is a beautiful place, and regardless of the cost, I think it was worth it, the school provides me with an excellent education and top of the line facilities, plus I do not miss the cold weather in Boston at all, my hometown is not a DO friendly city, its not a even a heart breaker because I have no plans on going back there to practice.
I'm at LECOM-SH.

I'm happy you're happy at AZCOM. I think it's a great school and Arizona's an awesome place-- personally, I just couldn't justify the price tag. However, that doesn't explain why you bring up your dislike of LECOM in just about every thread, especially if you didn't interview at any of the locations.
 

Henry101

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Seriously dude. Get over yourself. I'm not a psychologist, but I think you have some insecurity issues.
Don't forget, whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me
Keep the thread on topic and help the guy/girl out or leave.

Which LECOM do you go to? The one in Florida or Erie PA? I wound up only interviewing at DO schools in the Western US, mostly because I grew up in Boston and wanted to be in a new part of the country when I was applying. Arizona is a beautiful place, and regardless of the cost, I think it was worth it, the school provides me with an excellent education and top of the line facilities, plus I do not miss the cold weather in Boston at all, my hometown is not a DO friendly city, its not a even a heart breaker because I have no plans on going back there to practice.
 
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67552931811

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I'm at LECOM-SH.

I'm happy you're happy at AZCOM. I think it's a great school and Arizona's an awesome place-- personally, I just couldn't justify the price tag. However, that doesn't explain why you bring up your dislike of LECOM in just about every thread, especially if you didn't interview at any of the locations.
As a random aside, Pittsburgh is a really cool city. A lot cooler than one would think. Nice get away for you guys/ gals
 

W19

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The OP is going to a school where the curriculum is PBL, he is given clinical scenarios, I have heard of this method of learning, its good if the person already has a background in medical sciences but for many DO students, they will struggle. In many ways its like teaching yourself the Basic Sciences, its totally different from didactic learning where the professor gives you notes, you memorize the notes, and you consult the textbooks if you have any questions.
That's what most med students do since these PhD profs are useless anyway...
 

kenjixshadow

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That's what most med students do since these PhD profs are useless anyway...
Strong statement and I agree. There is one prof at my school who has a PhD degree in a completely different field to the subject being taught. Every time a student asked a question. It either got ignored or something like, "The question will lead to the answer" and every student was like :wtf::wtf::wtf:No one bothered to ask question anymore and upperclassmen told us just take it up pass the pectinate line and we'll get use to it.
 
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That's what most med students do since these PhD profs are useless anyway...
I noticed most of the basic science professors at DO schools are either of non English speaking immigrant backgrounds or younger professors just starting out. Don't get me wrong these people speak English extremely well but you can judge from their accents its not their first language. The older ones who are native English speakers are mostly at the Allopathic schools and larger research universities.
 

irJanus

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You are just really well traveled. Lol.
 

Launcelot

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I noticed most of the basic science professors at DO schools are either of non English speaking immigrant backgrounds or younger professors just starting out. Don't get me wrong these people speak English extremely well but you can judge from their accents its not their first language. The older ones who are native English speakers are mostly at the Allopathic schools and larger research universities.
That's a pattern I've also noticed, for better or for worse... And I haven't had many positive experiences working with many foreign PhDs either.
 
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That's a pattern I've also noticed, for better or for worse... And I haven't had many positive experiences working with many foreign PhDs either.
Its far more common at DO schools than at MD schools, you see a lot of people on non English speaking backgrounds. One of my professors is from Europe, he was kind of hard to understand at times but spoke pretty good English, he got his Phd in the US.
 
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I chose the avatar because of what it is says on his hat, Trump is not some pop star type of candidate like Obama was, and thankfully that is a good thing given what an utter disaster Obama has been. Bush was horrible as well. Trump has publicly lambasted them both. Why I like him? He is the one most likely to turn America back into a job creation engine.
I'm not gonna reply and get in a huge argument here - as I came to this thread to read and discuss what it's actually about - but is your account some sort of satire? Everything else aside, this part could very well be something I'd read in an Onion article. You're fired!
 
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user3

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I noticed most of the basic science professors at DO schools are either of non English speaking immigrant backgrounds or younger professors just starting out. Don't get me wrong these people speak English extremely well but you can judge from their accents its not their first language. The older ones who are native English speakers are mostly at the Allopathic schools and larger research universities.
I don't think its surprising though. You wouldn't expect schools lacking in research infrastructure or name recognition to be attracting the cream of the crop...
 
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I don't think its surprising though. You wouldn't expect schools lacking in research infrastructure or name recognition to be attracting the cream of the crop...
I think the schools hire these people for a number of reasons, many of them are foreign born, so its cheaper to hire them than an American born professor who will demand a higher salary. Also more likely to play ball with the school administrators without any kind of resistance.
 

doapplicant2015

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I think the schools hire these people for a number of reasons, many of them are foreign born, so its cheaper to hire them than an American born professor who will demand a higher salary. Also more likely to play ball with the school administrators without any kind of resistance.
Is AZCOM pricey because of the older, American born, native English speaking professors?
 
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