leacott

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Just wondering what the difference is?
I am in a non-HCA hospital at the moment and looking to transfer to an HCA facility to complete my anesthesiology residency. Would I be doing myself a disfavor? Anyone have any insight on this?
 

IMGASMD

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Just wondering what the difference is?
I am in a non-HCA hospital at the moment and looking to transfer to an HCA facility to complete my anesthesiology residency. Would I be doing myself a disfavor? Anyone have any insight on this?
Why are you transferring? Not enough case? Don’t like faculty? Don’t like the facility?

If number 1, then do it. Number 2, then maybe. Number 3, then wouldn’t bother.

It’s like everything else with the discussions of AMCs. There are general reasons why they suck. AFAIK, they all do. There are specific reasons why they suck, we need to know the specifics before giving you any answers.

Good luck.

Edit: bonus reading. There is a thread floating around with salary cut for residents. There’s a discussion about HCA. So maybe there is more reasons for or against transferring.
 
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leacott

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My wife is pregnant and so I'm looking to transfer to be closer to family. I don't care for the faculty or the facility. I can work just fine with anyone anywhere.
 
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IMGASMD

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Then does it really dependent on if it’s hca or not?
If you need to move for family then you move. unless the you’re unable to transfer or the training is vastly different or you’re planning on fellowship and one place is more academic than the other.
 

chocomorsel

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I would go out on a limb to say that the training one would get at HCA would likely be subpar.
I could be wrong though but I doubt they care about teaching as much as they care about the bottom line. Interviewed with them and saw their IM ICU rounds. Bizarre.
However, if one is motivated, you can do well. Probably have to teach yourself mostly.
 

leacott

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I would go out on a limb to say that the training one would get at HCA would likely be subpar.
I could be wrong though but I doubt they care about teaching as much as they care about the bottom line. Interviewed with them and saw their IM ICU rounds. Bizarre.
However, if one is motivated, you can do well. Probably have to teach yourself mostly.
Interesting. I have heard about this before. I wonder if someone with experience at both can comment on this.
 

ucladoc2b

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I would go out on a limb to say that the training one would get at HCA would likely be subpar.
I could be wrong though but I doubt they care about teaching as much as they care about the bottom line. Interviewed with them and saw their IM ICU rounds. Bizarre.
However, if one is motivated, you can do well. Probably have to teach yourself mostly.
HCA has gone from really having no GME to several thousand residents in a few years. These programs are so untested on several levels that I would be very hesitant to switch from a well established program (many of these programs are still in the initial accreditation phase). One anesthesia program (Largo) was closed earlier this year.

While I know there are likely many good aspects to these programs, I see a number of issues with the mass implementation of new residency programs (proper case volume, limited faculty experience with residents, limited teaching) in places that have no history of resident training whatsoever. Maybe these resolve in time. But I would avoid for now.
 
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leacott

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HCA has gone from really having no GME to several thousand residents in a few years. These programs are so untested on several levels that I would be very hesitant to switch from a well established program (many of these programs are still in the initial accreditation phase). One anesthesia program (Largo) was closed earlier this year.

While I know there are likely some good aspects to these programs, I see a number of issues with the mass implemetation of residency programs (proper case volume, limited faculty experience with residents, limited teaching) in places that have no history of resident training whatsoever. Maybe these resolve in time. But I would avoid for now.
Funny. Largo anesthesiology program is basically brand new.
 

nimbus

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Anesthesia residency is very short. How many years do you have left?
 
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Med school friend is currently an anesthesia resident in South Carolina, at an HCA Hospital and she was enjoying it very much.

However, this month the hospital replaced the longstanding PP anesthesia group with one of the large AMCs, who apparently needed to hire a ton of locums docs and temporary CRNAs to maintain OR coverage.
She said it's become quite a s-show, everyone (residents, surgeons) is unhappy, and education is clearly not a priority.

The issue with HCA hospitals is their focus is only shareholder profit and not patient care, or educating residents, in my opinion. They will always cut staff, resources, etc to keep their individual hospital looking good, as that mini-CEO tries to climb the corporate ladder.

I would really recommend an academic program, in any location whatsoever, over an HCA hospital trying to train the next generation of their in-house CRNA supervisors.
 

vector2

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Med school friend is currently an anesthesia resident in South Carolina, at an HCA Hospital and she was enjoying it very much.

However, this month the hospital replaced the longstanding PP anesthesia group with one of the large AMCs, who apparently needed to hire a ton of locums docs and temporary CRNAs to maintain OR coverage.
She said it's become quite a s-show, everyone (residents, surgeons) is unhappy, and education is clearly not a priority.

The issue with HCA hospitals is their focus is only shareholder profit and not patient care, or educating residents, in my opinion. They will always cut staff, resources, etc to keep their individual hospital looking good, as that mini-CEO tries to climb the corporate ladder.

I would really recommend an academic program, in any location whatsoever, over an HCA hospital trying to train the next generation of their in-house CRNA supervisors.
It's absurd that ACGME even gives any initial credentialing to these programs which from the very outset obviously have zero academic bonafides (or potential)
 

leacott

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Med school friend is currently an anesthesia resident in South Carolina, at an HCA Hospital and she was enjoying it very much.

However, this month the hospital replaced the longstanding PP anesthesia group with one of the large AMCs, who apparently needed to hire a ton of locums docs and temporary CRNAs to maintain OR coverage.
She said it's become quite a s-show, everyone (residents, surgeons) is unhappy, and education is clearly not a priority.

The issue with HCA hospitals is their focus is only shareholder profit and not patient care, or educating residents, in my opinion. They will always cut staff, resources, etc to keep their individual hospital looking good, as that mini-CEO tries to climb the corporate ladder.

I would really recommend an academic program, in any location whatsoever, over an HCA hospital trying to train the next generation of their in-house CRNA supervisors.
Yeah that one is new as well. I wonder how hard they work them. I read that Largo worked their residents like crazy. Its all so interesting imo.
 

leacott

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It's absurd that ACGME even gives any initial credentialing to these programs which from the very outset obviously have zero academic bonafides (or potential)
HCA is a big name. Money/influence talks I guess
 

nimbus

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I guess 3 years is short in the grand scheme of things. Though it appears much longer when going through
If you’re just finishing intern year that makes the decision more difficult. If you had 1 or 2 years left I’d say stick it out.
 

abolt18

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Just wondering what the difference is?
I am in a non-HCA hospital at the moment and looking to transfer to an HCA facility to complete my anesthesiology residency. Would I be doing myself a disfavor? Anyone have any insight on this?
Does your wife work and does she plan to go back to work after the baby? Would family be playing a significant helping role with the child to facilitate your careers?

I have raised my kids away from family and have no regrets. My wife and I are closer for it. Not to mention the fact that we would have very little real help from family if we lived close to them. We are fortunate that my wife has been able to stay home with the kids to raise them.

For me the stress and energy involved in transferring programs and moving, far exceeds the stresses involved in raising kids far away from family help.
 

leacott

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Does your wife work and does she plan to go back to work after the baby? Would family be playing a significant helping role with the child to facilitate your careers?

I have raised my kids away from family and have no regrets. My wife and I are closer for it. Not to mention the fact that we would have very little real help from family if we lived close to them. We are fortunate that my wife has been able to stay home with the kids to raise them.

For me the stress and energy involved in transferring programs and moving, far exceeds the stresses involved in raising kids far away from family help.
I am moving to be with my wife. She's actually by herself at this time. Funny to say but I am the more flexible one when it comes to moving.
 

abolt18

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I am moving to be with my wife. She's actually by herself at this time. Funny to say but I am the more flexible one when it comes to moving.
I see. Very different circumstances. We were never willing to live apart during our marriage so she's traveled with me for med school and residency. I better understand your desire to move now!

I'm assuming she has a career that isn't easy to leave behind or transition to a new city?
 
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Mehd School

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I think HCA programs are variable. Largo was mentioned here, there's also a new program in Las Vegas I think. Tulane for example, however has been around forever, and a close friend is training there. He's very happy and he's getting great training. He also got a pay raise, although I frustratingly did not at my program.
 

nimbus

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I am moving to be with my wife. She's actually by herself at this time. Funny to say but I am the more flexible one when it comes to moving.
Medical residency is not very flexible. What is worse than that? Is she in the military?
 

AdmiralChz

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I am moving to be with my wife. She's actually by herself at this time. Funny to say but I am the more flexible one when it comes to moving.
I am sure you had your reasons, but I have never understood folks who spent an entire residency apart from their spouse. A 1 year fellowship is do-able (still hard), but 3-4 years apart is probably a relationship killer (and has been for those I knew that did it). Might not be a bad idea to move, but just know you will be starting WAY behind the ball at a new program.

Also there’s timing - when would this new program accept you, July 1? August 1? Later? It’s too late in June to switch programs for a July 1 start and not impact your current program. If you absolutely must leave, try to do so on very good footing as you certainly don’t want to burn any bridges
 

leacott

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I am sure you had your reasons, but I have never understood folks who spent an entire residency apart from their spouse. A 1 year fellowship is do-able (still hard), but 3-4 years apart is probably a relationship killer (and has been for those I knew that did it). Might not be a bad idea to move, but just know you will be starting WAY behind the ball at a new program.

Also there’s timing - when would this new program accept you, July 1? August 1? Later? It’s too late in June to switch programs for a July 1 start and not impact your current program. If you absolutely must leave, try to do so on very good footing as you certainly don’t want to burn any bridges
I completely agree.
 
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