virgo

Registered Nurse
10+ Year Member
Dec 23, 2008
13
0
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Other Health Professions Student
Hey folks, new ADN RN here, continuing on to BSN, considering PA vs. MSN later on. Wannabe doc, but at 40, med school is not in the cards. Just know I don't want to be a floor nurse forever!
 

KNC

10+ Year Member
Mar 25, 2008
121
1
The Burgh
Status
Other Health Professions Student
Hey folks, new ADN RN here, continuing on to BSN, considering PA vs. MSN later on. Wannabe doc, but at 40, med school is not in the cards. Just know I don't want to be a floor nurse forever!

Welcome to the forum!!!
 

BlurredFocus

10+ Year Member
Jan 3, 2008
27
0
Status
Non-Student
If medical school is what you want, I'd go PA... it is taught on the medical model where NP is on the nursing model. Also, there is a push for NPs to have a doctorate degree so it could be a long road.
 
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virgo

Registered Nurse
10+ Year Member
Dec 23, 2008
13
0
Status
Other Health Professions Student
If medical school is what you want, I'd go PA... it is taught on the medical model where NP is on the nursing model. Also, there is a push for NPs to have a doctorate degree so it could be a long road.
Yep, a lot to consider. I still have time.
 

BlurredFocus

10+ Year Member
Jan 3, 2008
27
0
Status
Non-Student
If a doctor is what you would prefer, I'd personally go PA over NP because PAs are trained on the medical model like doctors are where NPs are essential advanced RNs trained on the nursing theory model.

Good luck on your RN-BSN program and welcome to the forum! I'd also check out www.allnurses.com and www.physicianassistantforum.com for more specific information on each field.
 

Febrifuge

Grizzled Old Newcomer
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
May 7, 2003
1,520
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febrifuge.blogspot.com
Status
Non-Student
Welcome!

Someone should probably bring this up, so I'm gonna take the plunge. I'm 38 myself, and in my final few rotations of PA school. While it's true that the PA thing is done in the medical model (and in fact a good PA student is just about indistinguishable on the wards from a good med student), the two tracks have some important differences. So, if what you truly want is to be an MD... you should go to school to be an MD. Don't let age or expense rule anything out, because sooner or later it all works out. I have a friend who practiced as a PA for a few years, then went back to med school. It's the better decision for her, but I bet she wishes she'd done that to begin with.

Each student has to have that moment of deep self-reflection, and be sure what they're going after really is what they want. It's better to do it early. Not only will admissions people be asking you "why did you choose to do x, and not y," but you should have a good firm answer for yourself. Because no matter what you choose, there will be days when you think, "man, I coulda done y and not x." I'm really happy with the PA thing, but I made sure I preferred it to NP or MD first.

For your situation, with the RN already under your belt, the smart money seems to be on NP -- it's generally at least somewhat possible to work a shift here and there as an RN while you're in school. PA education is pretty much designed to obliterate your free time for the duration, like some kind of evil carnival ride you don't dare unstrap yourself from.

On the other hand, if what you truly want is to practice medicine, then NP may or may not do it for you. I know a few really excellent clinicians who happen to be NPs, but I don't know enough about the nursing world to know if their experiences were typical. And of course a lot has to do with where you are and what the practice environment is like. There are places where NPs are all the rage, and places where PAs rule (plus a lot of places where they work shoulder-to-shoulder with no drama).
 
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