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Help with writing section!!!

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errrca930

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Every time I read a writing section prompt, I can never come up with any relevant examples. Do you have a list of examples you go into the test with, and if so, how did you make that list?

Also, should the synthesis paragraph relate the difference between your two examples above, or should it draw on something totally different?
 

smeagol

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You need to just tap into your pool of general knowledge, which may require a bit of creativity. I think a general high school education would be able to provide sufficient examples. I wouldn't devote a significant amount of time studying each and every prompt but if you read a source of world news daily I'm sure you'll find examples.

For instance, one of my prompts was to discuss the statement, "Pride weakens nations." I haven't taken any college history courses but I remember some things about the Third Reich in high school, and how Germany opened a war on two fronts a second time.
 

errrca930

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If I can't think of a specific example, is it bad to use a hypothetical example, or one that is not very, very specific?
 

Brick Walls

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If I can't think of a specific example, is it bad to use a hypothetical example, or one that is not very, very specific?

You can use hypothetical examples. In fact, if you are like me, and feel like my pool of general knowledge just isn't good enough, then be creative and come up with a hypothetical situation.
When I took my MCAT (i don't remember my specific prompt..its been awhile), but I remember one of the examples was about Watson and Crick. But what I said about them in my essay was probably not true at all. I totally made it up.

Just remember, when u do come up with an example, be very specific and make sure it shows whatever it is you are trying to show.
 

voirlesetoiles

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You can use hypothetical examples. In fact, if you are like me, and feel like my pool of general knowledge just isn't good enough, then be creative and come up with a hypothetical situation.
When I took my MCAT (i don't remember my specific prompt..its been awhile), but I remember one of the examples was about Watson and Crick. But what I said about them in my essay was probably not true at all. I totally made it up.

Just remember, when u do come up with an example, be very specific and make sure it shows whatever it is you are trying to show.

:thumbup: Sound advice.

Making stuff up totally works. I've done it. Your essay is based on the reasoning and how specific/relevant your examples are, not the accuracy. My writing score turned out well, although I can't say the same for the other sections. But I'm working on it :)
 
L

LikeClockWork

If I can't think of a specific example, is it bad to use a hypothetical example, or one that is not very, very specific?

The prompts ask for a specific example, but it doesn't say anything about them being true. Using the above poster's "Pride weakens nations," you wouldn't have to say something as specific as the Third Reich, but instead could say something along the lines of "Suppose there is a country that becomes so nationalistic that it begins to think itself superior to all other nations. When such runaway patriotism begins to manifest itself as aggression towards other nations it may lead to conflicts and wars. This would weaken the infrastructure of the country whose nationalism led them into the conflict...." yadda, yadda, yadda. Not perfect, but specific enough for what the essay is looking for.
 
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