atlantis1908

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So, given that my interests lie in health disparities and policy... which program seems to be the best way to go? Hopkins- MHS in Health, Behavior and Society or UNC- MPH in Health Behavior and Health Education.

Which would you choose??
 

shruts1116

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I would choose UNC because they are offering you a MPH
 

Cster0905

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So, given that my interests lie in health disparities and policy... which program seems to be the best way to go? Hopkins- MHS in Health, Behavior and Society or UNC- MPH in Health Behavior and Health Education.

Which would you choose??

Hey there:

I was in the same boat but have since resolved this MPH vs. MHS business.
I graduated from the HPAA department at UNC and I'm about 90% sure I'll be attending Hopkins' MHS in Health, Behavior, and Society next fall. Both are GREAT schools so you have a nice predicament.

I think it's best to break this analysis down in two ways:

1) DEGREE

Which degree works best for you really depends on your future interests.

MHS: The MHS degree is heavily research focused and, according to several PH folks I've spoken with regarding the comparison concern, is most beneficial and "stronger" if you intend to continue with your education at the doctorate level.

Additionally, if you would like to work in PH in the research sector, this degree may be best for you.

MPH: This degree is newer and designed for the practice of public health, not so much its research -- often as an "end point" degree. This is why you see fewer planning/assessment/evaluation courses in MPH curricula. It is the more recognized degree to folks outside of PH but it doesn't mean it is necessarily stronger or better.

BOTH: Many schools have dropped their MS programs - or at least don't advertise them as much - and have opted to offer the MPH as their principal Master level PH degree. Therefore, you have a meshing of courses between the programs that really dilutes the "difference." With a MPH you'll be able to pursue greater academic and research positions. With that said, you should be able to get a good job with a MHS though it may require a little more explanation.

2) SCHOOL

UNC and JHU are both great schools. From personal experience, do not think UNC doesn't have a good "selling name" compared to Harvard or JHU. In the health world, it does.

a. Which program's curriculum do you like better? Which faculty group shares your interests more? (Probably THE MOST important question.)

b. JHU: 11-month intensive program with a second year for electives and practicum vs. UNC: 2 year program

c. JHU: urban vs. UNC: suburban

d. JHU: HBS dept will pay %75 of your second year's tuition vs. UNC: are you an in-state student?


Those are just a few of myriad questions you could ask. Hope this helps!
 
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tt13

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Hey there:

I was in the same boat but have since resolved this MPH vs. MHS business.
I graduated from the HPAA department at UNC and I'm about 90% sure I'll be attending Hopkins' MHS in Health, Behavior, and Society next fall. Both are GREAT schools so you have a nice predicament.

I think it's best to break this analysis down in two ways:

1) DEGREE

Which degree works best for you really depends on your future interests.

MHS: The MHS degree is heavily research focused and, according to several PH folks I've spoken with regarding the comparison concern, is most beneficial and "stronger" if you intend to continue with your education at the doctorate level.

Additionally, if you would like to work in PH in the research sector, this degree may be best for you.

MPH: This degree is newer and designed for the practice of public health, not so much its research -- often as an "end point" degree. This is why you see fewer planning/assessment/evaluation courses in MPH curricula. It is the more recognized degree to folks outside of PH but it doesn't mean it is necessarily stronger or better.

BOTH: Many schools have dropped their MS programs - or at least don't advertise them as much - and have opted to offer the MPH as their principal Master level PH degree. Therefore, you have a meshing of courses between the programs that really dilutes the "difference." With a MPH you'll be able to pursue greater academic and research positions. With that said, you should be able to get a good job with a MHS though it may require a little more explanation.

2) SCHOOL

UNC and JHU are both great schools. From personal experience, do not think UNC doesn't have a good "selling name" compared to Harvard or JHU. In the health world, it does.

a. Which program's curriculum do you like better? Which faculty group shares your interests more? (Probably THE MOST important question.)

b. JHU: 11-month intensive program with a second year for electives and practicum vs. UNC: 2 year program

c. JHU: urban vs. UNC: suburban

d. JHU: HBS dept will pay %75 of your second year's tuition vs. UNC: are you an in-state student?


Those are just a few of myriad questions you could ask. Hope this helps!


I thought the MHS was research-based as well, but from another thread discussion (and the Hopkins website), the health policy and management department's MHS is actually NOT research-based. i'm not sure about the rest.
 

Cster0905

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I thought the MHS was research-based as well, but from another thread discussion (and the Hopkins website), the health policy and management department's MHS is actually NOT research-based. i'm not sure about the rest.


I was at Hopkins' admitted students day and they explained that MHS was research-based; hence the work restrictions on their MPH program.

Certainly this could be different between programs, and my department requires a practicum, as well, but I was speaking in the previous post as a fellow Health, Behavior, and Society MHS candidate.

Again, I suppose, considering Hopkins' departmental autonomy, it depends on the inherent nature of the material and the department's decision what the MHS degree's focus wil be.
 

Senior007

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Cster, Congrats on choosing Hokpins! I knew you were admitted to some great schools!! It feels nice to finally pick somewhere..
 

Cster0905

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Cster, Congrats on choosing Hokpins! I knew you were admitted to some great schools!! It feels nice to finally pick somewhere..

Senior:

Thanks. I'm not 100% sure yet. I'm still weighing a few options, mainly UCLA, Emory, and perhaps Yale. I'm indecisive by nature.

What have you decided?
 

Senior007

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I'm going to UNC-CH for my MHA. One question: do you know about the Gillings Gift and what impact that will have on the school?

Something like Gillings School of GLOBAL (?) Public Health
 

Cster0905

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I'm going to UNC-CH for my MHA. One question: do you know about the Gillings Gift and what impact that will have on the school?

Something like Gillings School of GLOBAL (?) Public Health

Yeah, the school received it when I was finishing up my last year. It was given to the school to be used for global health endeavors. Being a state university, UNC's first priority is clearly the state's health. It's a pretty big feat they are ranked #2 when that is such an integral part of their mission.

Apparently the way money had been allocated and the teachers told to teach meant more concentration was placed on state-level issues than those at a global level. The Gillings, however, understand that the global perspective is inextricably linked to public health and to teach PH well, one must focus on the micro and macro.

Therefore, the terms of their donation are that the money is to be used to improve facilities and to fund global efforts. This includes funding more abroad opportunities, integrating a more global focus into the curriculum, and setting up permanent UNC research sites internationally. The changed the name of the school (UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health), as well, because public health is a global issue and they don't want people thinking UNC lacks that focus.

I think it's a great step for UNC. The profs seem keen on it, too. To remain competitive and on the cutting-edge, UNC has to have a strong presence locally and internationally. It's going to provide some awesome opportunities to the students attending now and in the future.
 

Cster0905

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I'm going to UNC-CH for my MHA. One question: do you know about the Gillings Gift and what impact that will have on the school?

Something like Gillings School of GLOBAL (?) Public Health


Congrats on your choice! The University of North Carolina is a great school in a great town. You'll have a lot of fun.

GO HEELS!
 

tt13

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I'm going to UNC-CH for my MHA. One question: do you know about the Gillings Gift and what impact that will have on the school?

Something like Gillings School of GLOBAL (?) Public Health

We'll be classmates next fall =)
 

mystal

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I wanted to bring up the Hopkins vs. UNC match-up because I was just told by Hopkins that I have until Friday to make a decision, and I am really confused. I'm visiting Hopkins tomorrow and UNC on Thursday, so I will have more of an idea then, but just wanted to ask, what are peoples thoughts on these two schools?
 
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