Mar 30, 2010
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Pre-Medical
Hi!

This is my first time writing on the SDN. I was referred by a friend who recently was accepted into a terrific osteopathic medical school. I figure if it helped her out so much, I ought to give it a try. I have already read through several posts on the forums, and it's helpful to see what questions people have and to read the answers that come in response. Some information I already knew, and some was new to me, but I was mostly interested in seeing the way people answer.

I've noticed that whether the content of a response is credible or not, it is nearly always is decorated to sound very authoritative. From what I've seen in my pre-medical training thus far, this is a common characteristic for aspiring docs. I think that it's a good thing. Confidence is necessary to get into med school, and more importantly, it is necessary to be a good doctor. However, there is another side to this. Sometimes, in an attempt to win the "Who's the Smartest" game, noise is made. What I mean by that is that the loudest (possibly incorrect) person may present a good thought, the best input can be overlooked.

In my opinion, this is why medicine is practiced in teams. As I've observed hospital settings over the years, I've seen that the most successful, efficient, and happy medical teams, are those that include good listeners. A team doesn't work with everyone arguing for the glory of fixing the problem. A team listens to one another, works together, and the glory of fixing the problem is shared equally. From doctor to technician, a saved life is everyone's satisfaction.
Speaking of listening, I'm interested to hear other opinions and perspectives.

Have you noticed a similar trend among pre med students?
What interesting things have you noticed in group dynamics?
Regarding teamwork, how do you think hospitals ought to be run?

Thanks,
Chris
 
Jun 1, 2009
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Status
Medical Student
Hi!

This is my first time writing on the SDN. I was referred by a friend who recently was accepted into a terrific osteopathic medical school. I figure if it helped her out so much, I ought to give it a try. I have already read through several posts on the forums, and it's helpful to see what questions people have and to read the answers that come in response. Some information I already knew, and some was new to me, but I was mostly interested in seeing the way people answer.

I've noticed that whether the content of a response is credible or not, it is nearly always is decorated to sound very authoritative. From what I've seen in my pre-medical training thus far, this is a common characteristic for aspiring docs. I think that it's a good thing. Confidence is necessary to get into med school, and more importantly, it is necessary to be a good doctor. However, there is another side to this. Sometimes, in an attempt to win the "Who's the Smartest" game, noise is made. What I mean by that is that the loudest (possibly incorrect) person may present a good thought, the best input can be overlooked.

In my opinion, this is why medicine is practiced in teams. As I've observed hospital settings over the years, I've seen that the most successful, efficient, and happy medical teams, are those that include good listeners. A team doesn't work with everyone arguing for the glory of fixing the problem. A team listens to one another, works together, and the glory of fixing the problem is shared equally. From doctor to technician, a saved life is everyone's satisfaction.
Speaking of listening, I'm interested to hear other opinions and perspectives.

Have you noticed a similar trend among pre med students?
What interesting things have you noticed in group dynamics?
Regarding teamwork, how do you think hospitals ought to be run?

Thanks,
Chris
 

LuciusVorenus

Bad Medicine
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Apr 14, 2009
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Medical Student
Coming from someone who isn't in a premed filled major I'll tell you this, this is not something unique to premeds, it's just how people are. Engineering teams I've been a part of, and business teams I've observed, have this problem, and I would go so far as to say to a greater degree. I've even seen it among art history majors. Everyone just wants to be the smartest, so bad teammates are something you'll just have to learn to deal with :p

Also, probably bad choice for first post :laugh:
 
May 27, 2009
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Medical Student
...

Have you noticed a similar trend among pre med students?
What interesting things have you noticed in group dynamics?
Regarding teamwork, how do you think hospitals ought to be run?

Thanks,
Chris
1. Yes, but it's also a trend among people in general.
2. Some people need to stop pretending that they're right and start listening to those that are actually right.
3. With love and efficiency.

Welcome to SDN! :)

P.S. Shorter posts next time, por favor.