How do non-trads afford to go to school full time without working?

Joannavr

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Like the title says, I just don't understand how non trad students can afford to go to school full time without going bankrupt.
I know a lot of us do work (I work full time), but I know there are people who aren't independently wealthy, don't live with their parents, aren't supported by someone else, and STILL don't work. I was under the impression that student loans would NOT cover your living expenses if you live off campus. Personally I would rather take extra loans to pay my living expenses and graduate a year earlier by nearly doubling my courseload than continue working full time and going to school in my off hours. I am not interested in having a bunch of spending money, just having my bills taken care of and being able to eat. How is this accomplished??
 

Trismegistus4

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Like the title says, I just don't understand how non trad students can afford to go to school full time without going bankrupt.
I know a lot of us do work (I work full time), but I know there are people who aren't independently wealthy, don't live with their parents, aren't supported by someone else, and STILL don't work. I was under the impression that student loans would NOT cover your living expenses if you life off campus. Personally I would rather take extra loans to pay my living expenses and graduate a year earlier by nearly doubling my courseload than continue working full time and going to school in my off hours. I am not interested in having a bunch of spending money, just having my bills taken care of and being able to eat. How is this accomplished??
I found this puzzling before I went back to school, too. It turns out that student loans do cover your living expeneses.
 

DrMidlife

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Yep, loans saved my sorry butt. I have a little private loan too, and that was stunningly easy to get.
 
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Joannavr

Joannavr

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Tulsa, OK
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Why then have I only seen things that referenced living expenses not included? Can anyone provide a link to this information, or where I can research it further?

I have worked since I was 16, I don't even know what it's like not working. But with a full time job I am living month to month and scrambling to find time for my studies, which should be my priority instead of my menial work. I am not looking for a vacation, I am looking to advance!
 

DrMidlife

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Why then have I only seen things that referenced living expenses not included? Can anyone provide a link to this information, or where I can research it further?

I have worked since I was 16, I don't even know what it's like not working. But with a full time job I am living month to month and scrambling to find time for my studies, which should be my priority instead of my menial work. I am not looking for a vacation, I am looking to advance!
As a full time degree-seeking student you're eligible to borrow against cost of attendance, which includes cost of living (as defined by the school). Off-campus COA is higher than on-campus, and nobody's going to make you live on campus. The cost of supporting a family or car payment, etc., is NOT included. If you're not an admitted degree-seeking student, enrolled full time, you can't get federal loans. So then you either get yourself admitted and allege to pursue a degree (such as a second bachelors), or you get private loans.
 

DrMidlife

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PM me if you want help finding the info on your school.
 

jlittlej

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Go to the financial aid office as early as you can. They can be quite helpful. I showed up at the office at my new school the other day to discuss loan options and walked out with $4k for the year in grants despite not qualifying for some stuff because I'm a "second degree" student. That's almost half my tuition for the year, and I had no idea I was even eligible for grants.

They will make you fill out some federal paperwork online, which will spit out the amount they expect you to contribute to your education for the year - in other words, tuition + cost of living + expenses - your expected contribution is what you'll qualify for in loans.
 
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