How do you read/study?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by flynnt, Sep 6, 2002.

  1. Dr. Wexler

    Dr. Wexler Member
    Physician Bronze Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2001
    Messages:
    216
    Likes Received:
    16
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I just had my first day of chem 101 today. For those of you out there who have already taken a class in one of the sciences, how do you read the text? Do you highlight? take notes? make notes in the book? just read it?
    Also, in high school I used to always take notes in class and recopy them later. Do you think this would be a worthwhile habit to continue?
    Any other tips?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. tBw

    tBw totally deluded
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2001
    Messages:
    5,442
    Likes Received:
    16
    honestly, I think you could get as many different answers to this as there are people on SDN.

    I never highlighted. I read the chapter before class, listened in class, did the homework, sat the exam.

    For physics I did more practical problems.

    O'Chem was the only thing I ever made flashcards for, and I didn't think they were very useful in the end. Probably, the best advice is just to continue doing whatever has worked for you in the past...
     
  4. dpark74

    dpark74 Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2002
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree with boy wonder. Don't highlight because otherwise you'll find yourself highlighting every word in the book. Every single used book, which I have ever bought that had highlighter marks, was annoying to read.

    Just do what he said, especially reading the material before class. That way any confusion you had the night before can be clarified in lecture.

    Good luck with your studies.
     
  5. PrincessCKNY

    PrincessCKNY Crown Royal Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2002
    Messages:
    425
    Likes Received:
    19
    I just took very detailed class notes and studied those alongside the book. Do LOTS of practice problems. That should do the trick. Try to look at the big pictue to get a feel for what you are looking for. Try not to get too caught up in the math. If you spend some time using common sense trying to figure out what is actually going on (reaction-wise), the formulas will make sense.
     
  6. nero

    nero Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2000
    Messages:
    365
    Likes Received:
    1
    read before classs...that way when you take notes, its just reinforcing it like 3 times....you hear it, write it, and read what you wrote, all in one.....talk about efficiency....but it will only work if you read before class..........look at pics in the science books...most of the time, the text just explains the pics, but if you can understand the pic, then the text will just reinforce the pic.....i didn't highlight, or any of htat mess.....i would just read over and over.....................and over...............if you cement this stuff in your head, come mcat time, you wont' have to waste too much time "reviewing"............you can review a bit and start practicing..........for gen chem.......practice problems....ALL OF THEM, EVEN THE CHALLENGE ONES...
    good luck

    nero
     
  7. Random Access

    Random Access 1K Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2002
    Messages:
    1,302
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yeah...if it's not Bio...I don't even bother with the book. For chem/physics lecture notes and practice problems are much better, unless your prof really likes the book...none of mine seem to...


    -RA
     
  8. CD

    CD Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2002
    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    3
    You're going to have to find what works for you! There are several things that seem to help everyone though.

    1. Make sure you have already read the chapters that will be covered in lecture. For one thing this allows you to "hear" the material a second time around.

    2. Do tons of problems, Personally I found doing additional problems to be a great way to see all the various aspects of the concepts. The students I work with also seem to do better when they have done (or at least attempted) numerous problems.

    3. If you get stuck, don't wait to seek help!!! Most profs. (or at least their TA's) are willing to help. (I'm a gen. chem. TA and LOVE it when students come in!)

    4. Have a good attitude! When I did my undergrad (many years ago) I HATED chemistry. I managed to do Okay but chose my career based on the fact that Civil Engr. only required two terms of gen. chem. I struggled terribly with chemistry. Since I decided to return to school I decided to master my fear of chemistry and dove into the third of chem with abandon. Low and behold I discovered I LOVED it and am now in the midst of a chemistry masters! It's much easier this time around!!! Anything is easier to learn when you have a good attitude about it.

    Good luck! and if you have any specific questions, feel free to ask!

    --Cynthia
     
  9. FutureM.D.

    FutureM.D. Psychology major
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2002
    Messages:
    593
    Likes Received:
    0
    Pay attention to your lectures! Full attention and repetitive use is the only way to get the info in your long-term memory. :cool:
     
  10. brownemily22

    brownemily22 Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    here's what i always did in college. take it for what it's worth...
    1. went to class and listened. even if it meant showing up hung over in my pj's.
    2. made a study guide on my computer of all the notes/material to be covered on each test. they took a while to make but once i completed the study guide, i was money b/c i already knew all the material from typing it.

    it worked. i got good grades and didn't kill myself in the process.
     
  11. get the past years tests and start by reading those. then, if u've got time, do the homework/practice problems. you'll be all set, and prolly do better on the test than the peeps who read the book.
     
  12. Bevo

    Bevo Radiology, R1
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2002
    Messages:
    1,631
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Im constantly trying and changing things. Right now Ive gone away from highlighting what I read. Instead I get those post it notes that are see through, and try to summarize what I just read if it was important in that paragraph or page. Then I'll write down the summary notes I made into my notebook.

    Im trying this MAPing technique to try and relate everything I read togheter to A. make it easier to remember B. get a better understanding of how everything relates to one another.
     

Share This Page