How does partnership work?

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Yes it is very frustrating when you have people getting 2 or 3 days off a week regularly but they won't give you one day off.

Well, it tends to be a problem of short staffing and not a problem due to their arrangement of sharing FTE.

If you have 5 calls and 15 regular shifts for an FTE, it doesn't matter if 1 person does it or 3 people share it. The overall coverage and cost is the same. So if 3 people want to share that, it's their choice and it's not unfair to the rest of the group.

You can't expect to be able to force them to take more call or shifts than their proportional share.

If you don't have enough time off as an FT, then the solution is hiring more FT or PT...not expecting to squeeze more out of the FTE sharing pool of they aren't interested. But hiring will cost everyone a share of the revenue pie, so it's a matter of what you are willing to give up for that time off. Per diems can help if available, but that's if available regularly and reliably which they often aren't

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Well, it tends to be a problem of short staffing and not a problem due to their arrangement of sharing FTE.

If you have 5 calls and 15 regular shifts for an FTE, it doesn't matter if 1 person does it or 3 people share it. The overall coverage and cost is the same. So if 3 people want to share that, it's their choice and it's not unfair to the rest of the group.

You can't expect to be able to force them to take more call or shifts than their proportional share.

If you don't have enough time off as an FT, then the solution is hiring more FT or PT...not expecting to squeeze more out of the FTE sharing pool of they aren't interested. But hiring will cost everyone a share of the revenue pie, so it's a matter of what you are willing to give up for that time off. Per diems can help if available, but that's if available regularly and reliably which they often aren't
What matters is how those groups are formed. In most PP groups they are developed over time, so a group of 4 friends who have worked together start to share 3 FTE. When you have 3 new hires with less than a few years with the group wondering why they can't get a single day off to take care of personal things while the 4 more senior people are regularly getting days off it creates inequality. Then when your group gets slim the new hires can't form a working group.

"You can't expect to be able to force them to take more call or shifts than their proportional share."
Very true, but you expect group members to take a disproportionate share to what they want based on seniority? The proportional share should be amongst ALL members, not based on seniority or groups. i.e. you cover X number of locations, you hire Y number of people based on their desired FTE and vacation time. This is fair. When hard times come EVERY member has to pitch in more work distributing the pain evenly. If you have working groups the pain is not distributed. People would've stayed if the job market is bad, the job market is not bad.

Then this happens:
Then your even newer hires are getting squeezed more. You get to the point where it's difficult to cover all your locations in the contract. You ask for a stipend because you say you're having recruitment issues. You hire more people who are now getting overworked, they stay less than 2 years to go seek out an AMC job because they can get hired on as 0.8

The hospital sees you as more expensive, and the AMC as less expensive. Your senior partners in their working group are flummoxed as to why they lost the contract and why people aren’t chomping at the bit to join their great group with no flexibility and high overhead vs. an AMC. The same senior partners who weren't regularly asking for a small increased stipend and waited until the house was on fire, weren't making a fair schedule because their personal schedule worked for them. Yes, they did a good job creating a group, but a bad job maintaining a group.
 
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Maverikk is exactly right. While having a group of people split an FTE is reasonable and allows more senior partners in the group more freedoms, it can fracture the group if the same opportunities aren’t extended to other members. We work in an environment right now where everyone is stressed and every group is short. If newer members of the group aren’t able to get days off and have some freedom to live their lives outside of work, they will leave.
 
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Why do some jobs pay more for being boarded while the majority don’t care?
 
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