Feb 21, 2010
26
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
I was wondering if you guys have any idea about the importance of graduating from top ranking AuD programs. Some say it is not very important as long as we finish our degree and get certification while other say it affects getting a job after graduation and employers prefer people who graduate from such top ranking programs. What's your opinion guys? If you have to choose between a top program without funding and much less famous program with funding, what would your choice be?
 
Mar 2, 2010
5
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
no big arrow comes out of sky unfortunately. Nice to go to top program, of course (some of us do not have that chance). Financially anyone graduating will have a job, but at the height of your profession you can expect what $80,000.00 a year tops maybe? AUD's are not generally looking at money like investment bankers or cardiologists, is it worth going deep in debt when the guy who graduates from Missouri State might make the same money? On the other hand there is more to life than money and if you go to a top program you have more likihood to get a job you really want. Also factor in where you want to live as you are more likely to get a job in the region you go to graduate school.

These are all good questions with no answer. If I was smart enough to have an answer I would not have been rejected so far to every aud I have applied to so I am really uncertain why I am even trying to give you an answer other than to say be greatful you have the opportunity to make that choice.
 
OP
S
Feb 21, 2010
26
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
no big arrow comes out of sky unfortunately. Nice to go to top program, of course (some of us do not have that chance). Financially anyone graduating will have a job, but at the height of your profession you can expect what $80,000.00 a year tops maybe? AUD's are not generally looking at money like investment bankers or cardiologists, is it worth going deep in debt when the guy who graduates from Missouri State might make the same money? On the other hand there is more to life than money and if you go to a top program you have more likihood to get a job you really want. Also factor in where you want to live as you are more likely to get a job in the region you go to graduate school.
These are all good questions with no answer. If I was smart enough to have an answer I would not have been rejected so far to every aud I have applied to so I am really uncertain why I am even trying to give you an answer other than to say be greatful you have the opportunity to make that choice.
Yes. I agree with you. I hope you could hear some good news from other programs you have applied. Are you going to try one more year if you don't get into the program this year or do you have any other plan?
 
Mar 2, 2010
5
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
will try again. either that or ITT school of criminal justice. maybe have a future as a crime fighter. those ads look more exciting than twirling dials all day long.
 
Jan 18, 2010
92
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
We will probably all leave school with jobs in hand. However, if you are graduating from a top school, you are more likely to leave with your "dream job." Also, it's worth mentioning that many of the top schools are actually the ones that give the most funding. Of the eight schools I've been accepted to, the ones ranked #1, #4, and #9 have offered me scholarships. The others are ranked #24 and below and did not offer me money.
 
OP
S
Feb 21, 2010
26
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
We will probably all leave school with jobs in hand. However, if you are graduating from a top school, you are more likely to leave with your "dream job." Also, it's worth mentioning that many of the top schools are actually the ones that give the most funding. Of the eight schools I've been accepted to, the ones ranked #1, #4, and #9 have offered me scholarships. The others are ranked #24 and below and did not offer me money.

wow! that's interesting.
But, my case is opposite. I got some funding from an unlisted program (Missouri SU) where I have no idea how good this program is. I also got into one of top ranking programs without funding. It is so hard for me to decide where to go because my financial situation is not so good and I don't want to end up with a large amount of debt after graduation.
I need some advice. SO Audie2014 Have u decided where you go?
 
Aug 6, 2009
139
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
wow! that's interesting.
But, my case is opposite. I got some funding from an unlisted program (Missouri SU) where I have no idea how good this program is. I also got into one of top ranking programs without funding. It is so hard for me to decide where to go because my financial situation is not so good and I don't want to end up with a large amount of debt after graduation.
I need some advice. SO Audie2014 Have u decided where you go?
I personally would choose to leave school with no debt. I would like to live my life when I get out of school without paying a monthly payment towards school I just completed. I would like to buy a house maybe a new car, and I dont feel that being in debt almost $90,000 (when its all said and done) is worth a top program. All the programs are what you make of it. I work with one of the best audiologists I have ever met or worked with, and she didnt graduate from the top ranking programs. If there was any advise I could share it would be that, it is what you make of it. You could go to some school that isnt even ranked.. get a GA and a lot of experience. You never know what your experience will be until you put forth 100% of your time and effort into getting what you want out of it. I still have yet to chose a program and I have been denied the opportunity to really choose where to go. Visit the program if you need to base your choice on the facility. Make time and talk to the faculty and students.

Hope this helps!
 
Jan 18, 2010
92
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Sangh, I think eardocsavvy is right that you should try to visit MSU's program if you can. Talk to current students and see if they are happy with their education. Find out if they feel they're getting a well-rounded experience, particularly in terms of clinical placements. Ask them what they would do if they were in your shoes--would they go to MSU with funding or would they choose the other program?

And remember you may still end up with a good financial aid package from FAFSA, if you applied or are applying soon. (And speaking of FAFSA, does anyone know when we find out about that? I have no clue how it works.)

Also, you might want to get in touch with your other school (which one is it, by the way?) and tell them that you desperately need an assistantship. Who knows? Maybe they will be able to scrounge something up for you if they think they may lose you to MSU.

Oh, and I haven't decided where I'm going yet, but I have it narrowed down to Northwestern and Vanderbilt. I have already visited Vandy, which was great, and I'm heading up to Northwestern on April 2nd to help me make my final decision. Can't wait to make a choice!
 
OP
S
Feb 21, 2010
26
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Sangh, I think eardocsavvy is right that you should try to visit MSU's program if you can. Talk to current students and see if they are happy with their education. Find out if they feel they're getting a well-rounded experience, particularly in terms of clinical placements. Ask them what they would do if they were in your shoes--would they go to MSU with funding or would they choose the other program?

And remember you may still end up with a good financial aid package from FAFSA, if you applied or are applying soon. (And speaking of FAFSA, does anyone know when we find out about that? I have no clue how it works.)

Also, you might want to get in touch with your other school (which one is it, by the way?) and tell them that you desperately need an assistantship. Who knows? Maybe they will be able to scrounge something up for you if they think they may lose you to MSU.

Oh, and I haven't decided where I'm going yet, but I have it narrowed down to Northwestern and Vanderbilt. I have already visited Vandy, which was great, and I'm heading up to Northwestern on April 2nd to help me make my final decision. Can't wait to make a choice!
U of Pittsburgh does have any funding for the first year students coming this year. That sucks.
 
Mar 25, 2010
9
0
Status
Rehab Sci Student
I really don't think it's that important. "Top rank" really means nothing. It means they get a lot of research money and are a well-known school. Some of the best AuD programs are at small schools that aren't even in the top 25. It doesn't make them a bad school. Look at the A.T. Still program. Not even ranked, but probably one of the best, most comprehensive programs out there. I'd also beg to differ on Northwestern's program. In fact, my undergrad audiology prof told me not to go there because it's still basically the same masters program she did there.

I'd skip the rankings and go for the school YOU fit in. I disagree about getting the dream job, too... You don't need the #1 school to get it. You need good grades, a good resume, a great 4th year placement and a good interview.
 
Jan 18, 2010
92
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Well, the reason that I feel a person would be more likely to leave with his or her "dream job" from a more highly ranked school is simply that I have asked Vanderbilt, UNC-Chapel Hill, and an unranked school how their students fair in getting the jobs they want. Vandy and UNC said their students do extremely well in securing their dream jobs. The unranked said, "Ummm....well... it's a very competitive job market." I didn't take that as a great sign.

Also, if you have any more insights into the Northwestern program, I would love to hear them. I don't want to hijack this thread too much, so please PM me if you can help me learn more about the school. It always helps to get different perspectives. Thanks! :)
 
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Feb 17, 2010
16
1
Status
Rehab Sci Student
I think that it is important to consider where you want to be when you graduate. If you plan to live in southern Missouri - I think that going to school there would allow you the ability to build professional relationships with Audiologists in the surrounding community through practicum experience as well as get a feel for where you would like to work.

If you do not know where you want to be, or know that you don't want to be in southern MO - then ask yourself, which place is going to:
1.) Offer me a challenging academic program
2.) Allowing me to have broad and plentiful practicum experiences
3.) Encourages research along with an in-depth Capstone/end-of-year project that is more than a systematic review of the literature
4.) Has a good enough reputation to spark interest in potential 4th year supervisors.

You may be saying - eh - research? That's not for me. Well, it doesn't mean that you have to do it for the rest of your life, but I've learned that having some research experience helps you to become a more critical reader of the journals because you have some insight into the process.

This is a great background to have along with highly respected faculty when dealing with 4th year placements. Everyone has to do practicum, those 4th year sites want to know what extra things you did during your time at school and who did you study under that they, too, respect in the field.

So, if you're not sure where you want to be when it's all said and done, I would go to the place that you feel will have the resources to help mold you into that "complete package" that your (dare I say) "dream" 4th year or "dream" job would want fight for in an extern/employee.

Good luck!!
 
Mar 25, 2010
9
0
Status
Rehab Sci Student
I'm going to disagree on that one really. The current 3rd year students in my program have had no issue getting 4th year placements, and none of them are within an hour of the school, haha. They're placed anywhere from Cali to Florida, Boston Children's, Timothy Hain's practice, etc.

I do agree with your ideas about going to a practice that's going to challenge you, though. Don't be pulled into an area that's going to hold you down. Expand your horizons. At my school, we don't have to do comps or a capstone, so that's a non-issue, but quite a few of the students are participating in research on their own. I'm doing a project now that will hopefully be ready for AAA next year. Placements like Timothy Hain's practice require a research project during the 4th year as well.

In the end, I really think the school matters less than your willingness to put yourself out there and strive for the best for yourself.
 
Feb 17, 2010
16
1
Status
Rehab Sci Student
One clarification.

I didn't mean that not going to a prestigious school would not get you a 4th year placement. I'm pretty confident that most students get A placement. It's a matter of what type of placement.

I was just eluding to the fact that it may be a little more difficult to get the attention of a more competitive 4th year placement (e.g. House Eye and Ear, OHSU, Johns Hopkins) if you're at an institution where the faculty may not be as well known by that potential 4th year site.

I just mention this point because when I was applying for graduate school, I was no where near considering where I wanted to be for my 4th year. So, I thought that it may be a nice little heads up.
 
Sep 23, 2009
31
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
I have spoken with people from schools all over the ranking list and the general consensus that I have been getting is that the US News and World and Report rankings are a joke and more of a beauty pageant then a credible ranking system. Some of the things they base their ratings on include the reputation of the school in general, how much money their alums donate, whether there is also a Ph.D program, and whether there is a prestigious med school attached to the school. A small program like the Au.D isn't really affected all that much by these things, except of you want to get your Ph.D, which most of us won't. It really has nothing to do with how good the program actually is, how helpful the faculty are, or how well it prepares you for future practice.

Sure, it wouldnt hurt to say you graduated from vanderbilt but everyone knows thats a great school. Most schools towards the top of the list aren't going to matter as much and are less likely to get you noticed.

I have been accepted to schools all over the ranking list and I am making my decision on 4 main factors: how happy I think I will be in the area, the feel I get from the faculty when I speak with them, the opportunities I will have to work at offsite locations for experience outside of the classroom and the ability to make some of my own decisions as to where I want to go, and how much it's all going to cost me (remember people we are not going to make $200,000 right out of school and you will want to buy a house someday!)

Of course, this is just my opinion on the whole "ranking issue" and some will probably disagree! Good luck to you all (and no, I have not completely decided on where I am going to go.)
 
Jan 18, 2010
92
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Based on Saucy and Venti's posts, I think people may be misinterpreting what I've written. I am not by any means suggesting that sangh needs to attend Vanderbilt or Northwestern. He asked simply asked where I was thinking of going, and I told him. Just wanted to clarify! :)
 
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Mar 10, 2010
4
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I was wondering if any of you could tell me about UT Knoxville Audiology Program.
 

TennaciousD

7+ Year Member
Sep 24, 2009
20
4
Status
Non-Student
A couple of suggestions. The first requirement when selecting school is to feel comfortable with the faculty, the city, the program etc. You do not want to spend the next 4 years of your life miserable. Outside of that you NEXT consideration should be Cost. Then your third should also be COST. The average starting salary for Audiologists will be anywhere from 35,000-55,000 straight out of school. You should not borrow more that your first years salary. Choose the school that your are comfortable with that gives you either in-state tuition, scholarships, or assistantships. I have seen many students come through and finish with 100,000 in student loans. They will never see the light of day on those loans. With interest their education will easily end up costing them 200,000 to 250,000 dollars. Think about how much that will cost a month for the next 20 years.

Secondly, I attended UT Knoxville and would be happy to answer any questions regarding the program for the previous poster.
 

cidanu

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Feb 16, 2009
345
0
Status
Rehab Sci Student
or you could plan to work in public service and hope hope that in fifteen years, loan forgiveness programs will still be around to save you! =) maybe not the most financially sound plan but you never know!
 

Hearatic

10+ Year Member
Aug 15, 2008
22
0
Status
Rehab Sci Student
Well Audie - if you accepted at Vandy, welcome! See ya in the fall :)
 
May 18, 2010
507
0
Treasure Valley, Idaho
Status
Rehab Sci Student
We will probably all leave school with jobs in hand. However, if you are graduating from a top school, you are more likely to leave with your "dream job." Also, it's worth mentioning that many of the top schools are actually the ones that give the most funding. Of the eight schools I've been accepted to, the ones ranked #1, #4, and #9 have offered me scholarships. The others are ranked #24 and below and did not offer me money.
I just want to pipe up and leave my two cents here.

If you are going by the US News and World Report rankings, it makes sense that the higher-ranked schools would offer more money.

The method of ranking isn't based on how great the professors are or how interesting the classes turn out to be. It's based on monetary things, like number/amount of grants, size of the library, etc. Thus, higher rankings roughly correlate with bigger budgets.

Just a thought. :)