how many dental students have thought about committing suicide?

verticalbite

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This is a valid question. It seems that there are several depressed students in my dental class.

All of us come from different backgrounds but many have been leaders or go-getters of some type and now were all put together in such a hostile environment where the professors/dental school administration as constantly putting us down with insults and its almost like they are competing to see who can be the most unprofessional to us.

Dental school is a very hostile environment, at least my school is. It will change a person, you will not be the same after you leave there.
 

Katalyst

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This is a valid question. It seems that there are several depressed students in my dental class.

All of us come from different backgrounds but many have been leaders or go-getters of some type and now were all put together in such a hostile environment where the professors/dental school administration as constantly putting us down with insults and its almost like they are competing to see who can be the most unprofessional to us.

Dental school is a very hostile environment, at least my school is. It will change a person, you will not be the same after you leave there.
Glad I'm not at that school. I've never known a more tight-knit group than those 60 students in my dental class. I will continue to wonder why suicide rate in our profession is so high.
 
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verticalbite

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Glad I'm not at that school. I've never known a more tight-knit group than those 60 students in my dental class. I will continue to wonder why suicide rate in our profession is so high.


we have a very tight nit group. We are like sheep and were stickin together because we never know when a wolf will attempt to get one of us.

Honestly, I love my class. I hate the school. I wish I would have went somewhere else. We are all close, half of our class is on wellbutrin for depression, the other is the adderall takers, everyone is struggling being in the worst demotivating situation of our lives.
 
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rarm1

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I am sorry your faculty is not student friendly. Your classmates need a mentor... At my University, I wanted to drop out... my brother was dying. The dean helped as well as many of the faculty... well since graduation i have been in education, mentored many, others who were in my position who wanted to drop out.

Unfortunately if the person does not seek help, no one can do anything.

Good luck to your friends. If i can be of any help, let me know,
 

informatique

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==half of our class is on wellbutrin for depression, the other is the adderall takers, everyone is struggling being in the worst demotivating situation of our lives.
Wow, i hope this is exaggerated information. Do you mind disclosing the location of your school if not the name?
 

verticalbite

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Wow, i hope this is exaggerated information. Do you mind disclosing the location of your school if not the name?

no exaggeration. I just wanted to know if other schools were the same.

Our school is going thru accreditation and we have an interim dean and an interim clinic supervisor and so many miserable part-timers who are supplementing their practice income by coming here and making our lives miserable.

Honestly, who in their right mind would want to return to the dental school and work there.

not me!
 

DrJeff

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Yup, there are times, and sometimes very long times, when as a student that generally speaking has been a high achiever and is used to success(heck you got into d-school), dental school sucks. It seems like all the faculty are conspiring against you and your class and very often those faculty seem out of touch with reality. The administration will also seem to be against you in time like this. I've felt the same way, and frankly I bet that if you polled all dental school grads(both recent and from long ago), you'd see that the majority feel this way.

I know it's tough, but don't despair. Just remember a few key things, and very often this will also require a change in your view/attitude.

#1 if a d-school accepted you, it means that they are convinced that you can handle the work and successfully graduate ontime with your class and that you have the potential to be a successful dentist in the future

#2 in one sense, d-school is almost like the TV show survivor, except that nobody has to get kicked off. The bottomline is in one sense it is a game. What that game may very well be is satisfying the professors and what their view of a dentist is. This is what gets alot of folks and what causes the perception that you as a student is on someones bad side. Where I'm going with this, is from the 1st day you show up for orientation at a d-school, until the day you get the diploma, you are enrolled in a PROFESSIONAL school. This isn't undergrad anymore. Many "seasoned" faculty were trained in a much different era, one where dressing the stereotypical part and acting the stereotypical part went without saying, and when they see what THEY perceive as someone not showing their respect to the profession by NOT dressing/acting that way, perceptions get formed and formed early.

I can't stress this enough, and I'm all for personal freedoms, but if you want to get the best reaction from a faculty member/administration, act like a professional from DAY 1. Dress atleast what's the modern defination of business casual. Maintain a "professional" appearance grooming wise. And above all, treat the faculty members with respect, afterall while you're in d-school THEY have the letters behind their names that you want and as such, they have earned the respect that so many of them crave. This is what's so tough for so many folks to grasp, achieving this level of "oldtime" stereotypical professionalism in a modern world. Will it necessarily be how you act when your out in private practice, nope. Will it though help eliminate in many instances what can be a perceived problem, and that is respect from the faculty, YES. In this way, d-school is a big game. If you play the game by the "rules" you're much more likely to have a successful outcome.
 

Enso

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Yup, there are times, and sometimes very long times, when as a student that generally speaking has been a high achiever and is used to success(heck you got into d-school), dental school sucks. It seems like all the faculty are conspiring against you and your class and very often those faculty seem out of touch with reality. The administration will also seem to be against you in time like this. I've felt the same way, and frankly I bet that if you polled all dental school grads(both recent and from long ago), you'd see that the majority feel this way.

I know it's tough, but don't despair. Just remember a few key things, and very often this will also require a change in your view/attitude.

#1 if a d-school accepted you, it means that they are convinced that you can handle the work and successfully graduate ontime with your class and that you have the potential to be a successful dentist in the future

#2 in one sense, d-school is almost like the TV show survivor, except that nobody has to get kicked off. The bottomline is in one sense it is a game. What that game may very well be is satisfying the professors and what their view of a dentist is. This is what gets alot of folks and what causes the perception that you as a student is on someones bad side. Where I'm going with this, is from the 1st day you show up for orientation at a d-school, until the day you get the diploma, you are enrolled in a PROFESSIONAL school. This isn't undergrad anymore. Many "seasoned" faculty were trained in a much different era, one where dressing the stereotypical part and acting the stereotypical part went without saying, and when they see what THEY perceive as someone not showing their respect to the profession by NOT dressing/acting that way, perceptions get formed and formed early.

I can't stress this enough, and I'm all for personal freedoms, but if you want to get the best reaction from a faculty member/administration, act like a professional from DAY 1. Dress atleast what's the modern defination of business casual. Maintain a "professional" appearance grooming wise. And above all, treat the faculty members with respect, afterall while you're in d-school THEY have the letters behind their names that you want and as such, they have earned the respect that so many of them crave. This is what's so tough for so many folks to grasp, achieving this level of "oldtime" stereotypical professionalism in a modern world. Will it necessarily be how you act when your out in private practice, nope. Will it though help eliminate in many instances what can be a perceived problem, and that is respect from the faculty, YES. In this way, d-school is a big game. If you play the game by the "rules" you're much more likely to have a successful outcome.
Excellent post. Thanks.
 

Daurang

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#2 in one sense, d-school is almost like the TV show survivor, except that nobody has to get kicked off. The bottomline is in one sense it is a game. What that game may very well be is satisfying the professors and what their view of a dentist is. This is what gets alot of folks and what causes the perception that you as a student is on someones bad side. Where I'm going with this, is from the 1st day you show up for orientation at a d-school, until the day you get the diploma, you are enrolled in a PROFESSIONAL school. This isn't undergrad anymore. Many "seasoned" faculty were trained in a much different era, one where dressing the stereotypical part and acting the stereotypical part went without saying, and when they see what THEY perceive as someone not showing their respect to the profession by NOT dressing/acting that way, perceptions get formed and formed early.
DrJeff always gives great advice.

You get into a faculty's bad side and they will pass it on and everyone else will have a bad impression of you. A lot if not most of them are ahole, drug addict, alcoholic, real life loser, multiple board-failer, clinician who can't handle real life dentistry; but you still gotta play the politics game and pretend to give them all the respect because your future is in their hands. I looked at it as a short prison stay.
 

verticalbite

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Yup, there are times, and sometimes very long times, when as a student that generally speaking has been a high achiever and is used to success(heck you got into d-school), dental school sucks. It seems like all the faculty are conspiring against you and your class and very often those faculty seem out of touch with reality. The administration will also seem to be against you in time like this. I've felt the same way, and frankly I bet that if you polled all dental school grads(both recent and from long ago), you'd see that the majority feel this way.

I know it's tough, but don't despair. Just remember a few key things, and very often this will also require a change in your view/attitude.

#1 if a d-school accepted you, it means that they are convinced that you can handle the work and successfully graduate ontime with your class and that you have the potential to be a successful dentist in the future

#2 in one sense, d-school is almost like the TV show survivor, except that nobody has to get kicked off. The bottomline is in one sense it is a game. What that game may very well be is satisfying the professors and what their view of a dentist is. This is what gets alot of folks and what causes the perception that you as a student is on someones bad side. Where I'm going with this, is from the 1st day you show up for orientation at a d-school, until the day you get the diploma, you are enrolled in a PROFESSIONAL school. This isn't undergrad anymore. Many "seasoned" faculty were trained in a much different era, one where dressing the stereotypical part and acting the stereotypical part went without saying, and when they see what THEY perceive as someone not showing their respect to the profession by NOT dressing/acting that way, perceptions get formed and formed early.

I can't stress this enough, and I'm all for personal freedoms, but if you want to get the best reaction from a faculty member/administration, act like a professional from DAY 1. Dress atleast what's the modern defination of business casual. Maintain a "professional" appearance grooming wise. And above all, treat the faculty members with respect, afterall while you're in d-school THEY have the letters behind their names that you want and as such, they have earned the respect that so many of them crave. This is what's so tough for so many folks to grasp, achieving this level of "oldtime" stereotypical professionalism in a modern world. Will it necessarily be how you act when your out in private practice, nope. Will it though help eliminate in many instances what can be a perceived problem, and that is respect from the faculty, YES. In this way, d-school is a big game. If you play the game by the "rules" you're much more likely to have a successful outcome.

WOW, so true! thanks.
 

verticalbite

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Dec 20, 2008
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DrJeff always gives great advice.

You get into a faculty's bad side and they will pass it on and everyone else will have a bad impression of you. A lot if not most of them are ahole, drug addict, alcoholic, real life loser, multiple board-failer, clinician who can't handle real life dentistry; but you still gotta play the politics game and pretend to give them all the respect because your future is in their hands. I looked at it as a short prison stay.

Another great post!!!

Actually, several of them are alcoholics!
 
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Shunwei

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May 26, 2007
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Yup, there are times, and sometimes very long times, when as a student that generally speaking has been a high achiever and is used to success(heck you got into d-school), dental school sucks. It seems like all the faculty are conspiring against you and your class and very often those faculty seem out of touch with reality. The administration will also seem to be against you in time like this. I've felt the same way, and frankly I bet that if you polled all dental school grads(both recent and from long ago), you'd see that the majority feel this way.

I know it's tough, but don't despair. Just remember a few key things, and very often this will also require a change in your view/attitude.

#1 if a d-school accepted you, it means that they are convinced that you can handle the work and successfully graduate ontime with your class and that you have the potential to be a successful dentist in the future

#2 in one sense, d-school is almost like the TV show survivor, except that nobody has to get kicked off. The bottomline is in one sense it is a game. What that game may very well be is satisfying the professors and what their view of a dentist is. This is what gets alot of folks and what causes the perception that you as a student is on someones bad side. Where I'm going with this, is from the 1st day you show up for orientation at a d-school, until the day you get the diploma, you are enrolled in a PROFESSIONAL school. This isn't undergrad anymore. Many "seasoned" faculty were trained in a much different era, one where dressing the stereotypical part and acting the stereotypical part went without saying, and when they see what THEY perceive as someone not showing their respect to the profession by NOT dressing/acting that way, perceptions get formed and formed early.

I can't stress this enough, and I'm all for personal freedoms, but if you want to get the best reaction from a faculty member/administration, act like a professional from DAY 1. Dress atleast what's the modern defination of business casual. Maintain a "professional" appearance grooming wise. And above all, treat the faculty members with respect, afterall while you're in d-school THEY have the letters behind their names that you want and as such, they have earned the respect that so many of them crave. This is what's so tough for so many folks to grasp, achieving this level of "oldtime" stereotypical professionalism in a modern world. Will it necessarily be how you act when your out in private practice, nope. Will it though help eliminate in many instances what can be a perceived problem, and that is respect from the faculty, YES. In this way, d-school is a big game. If you play the game by the "rules" you're much more likely to have a successful outcome.
Fantastic advice, one that I give my younger classmates as well. I might add that not only is dental school a game, but pretty much all post-undergrad programs, whether it's PhD, MD, DDS, PharmD, whatever: It is indeed a game, to certain extents. Play by the rules, and you should be fine. Just remember what your ultimate goal is (getting that coveted degree), and in time you will be free. It's not that big of a deal really.
 

Istr8nthem

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Is it really that depressing to teach dentistry? I wouldn't think so. It's a pretty laid-back, low stress job.
The whole reason they are teaching may be the reason they are depressed. I found that during dental school most of the Docs were great, but there were always those stubborn a**holes that you could just tell were bullied all through dental school. Now it was their turn to do the bullying and they were going to take advantage of the role reversal. At my school, these particulars were few and far between, but they were still present. I think at other schools they may be more in number only because it is tolerated by the administration and the students. It was NOT tolerated at my school as the students had a great reputation with the administration and worked hard with them at making the dental school experience as stress free and as bullsh*t free as possible.
 

MONKEYBOY

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The exclusive dialogue consisting of:

(1.) points, points, points, get the most points...
(2.) constant focus on money
(3.) how poor people just don't get it

gets quite depressing (currently and thinking about the insignificance these denti$t$ are going to contribute to society, read: cosmetic catering to rich geezers and their bored lives).

Again, bigtime depressing. Minimizing the time at school and with these JO classmates helps.

A 4 year detention term is a good way to describe it. Keep quiet, lay low, and thank your classmates and profs for their **** advice and harassment -- this is what they want in the grand scheme. Try it, it works.
 

Lurchdubious

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I know I had a couple exams last semester that made me wanna put a gun barrel in my mouth, but on the whole it's not so bad.

Really, life is what you make it. If you can't be happy now when you're just a student, how will the rigors of practice ownership treat you?
 

haisha ni narou

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What kind of thread is this? Ya, life sucks sometimes so get over it. Everyone will bomb a test here and there, it's dental school and there is probably a test the next day and the day after that to redeem yourself. It could be a lot worse, you could be in Pharm school (OOhhhhhhhhhh...... BAAAAAZING!!!:smuggrin:)
 
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Tooth

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I have found dental school to be the easiest ride I've had since grade school. My undergraduate experience was far worse than dental school. It has all been downhill from college. Yes, there are some teachers at ds who I think bring down the school but every school has them. I would imagine that you've overestimated the amount of your class on antidepressants or are just exaggerating the truth.
 

PERFECT3435

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suicide?

seriously?

i have had plenty of those days in dental school that made me wonder how i was gonna get through the day or week but to think about suicide i am lost for words.

dental is not easy at times and you just have to go through it. if you think your school is the only one like that boy do i have news for you.

just hang in there. many have gone through that and so will you.

good luck!
 

Northside

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I'm just wondering... is transferring into a different school an option?
 
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PERFECT3435

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I'm just wondering... is transferring into a different school an option?
i wouldnt transfer even if it is an option. chances are nothing will be different if you go somewhere else. every school has its own BS and things you wont be happy about. just stay where you are and FINISH.
 

youngmc27

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i wouldnt transfer even if it is an option. chances are nothing will be different if you go somewhere else. every school has its own BS and things you wont be happy about. just stay where you are and FINISH.
Amen!!!
 

DrReo

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"To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the gift"
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loved

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Nothing in this world worth having comes easy.

have you all learned nothing from Dr. Kelso?
 

Cold Front

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I see why some people may be stressed out, dental school is without a doubt a physically and mentally demanding environment. But, if you manage your time well, and plan ahead as things line-up, you should be able to enjoy yourself.

Depending on the curriculum, some schools may have more stress-inducing style to them than others. For example, Tufts have block exams, Temple do their own lab-work in clinic, UOP has no summer breaks, etc.

Regardless where you go, your program will be easier and harder one way or the other than the other programs. You just have to accept it, work hard, and play hard.
 
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Not just in dental but also medical and pharmacy school.

I was bullied by a faculty and failed on a rotation.

Now the school keeps sending donation request.
Hell no, my makeup rotation was the freebie. Fuk my school!



This is a valid question. It seems that there are several depressed students in my dental class.

All of us come from different backgrounds but many have been leaders or go-getters of some type and now were all put together in such a hostile environment where the professors/dental school administration as constantly putting us down with insults and its almost like they are competing to see who can be the most unprofessional to us.

Dental school is a very hostile environment, at least my school is. It will change a person, you will not be the same after you leave there.
 

Pre-Dent Jeff

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I'm just about to start d-school, so the only experience I have is undergrad, but if it's really tough and stressing you should just go buy a pet. I mean seriously, how can you be depresses with a pet? There is a reason why soldiers with PTSD heal better with pets.

That's just my little input.
 
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I'm just about to start d-school, so the only experience I have is undergrad, but if it's really tough and stressing you should just go buy a pet. I mean seriously, how can you be depresses with a pet? There is a reason why soldiers with PTSD heal better with pets.

That's just my little input.
Just amend that to adopt a pet from a shelter instead of buy a pet, and I agree 100%. ;)
 

Incis0r

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Just amend that to adopt a pet from a shelter instead of buy a pet, and I agree 100%. ;)
Further amendment: If you like cats/kittens, make sure to get two of them (from the same litter if possible)- they can play with each other/exercise with each other when you are out all day in dental school.
 
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Further amendment: If you like cats/kittens, make sure to get two of them (from the same litter if possible)- they can play with each other/exercise with each other when you are out all day in dental school.
Even further amendment: Why pretend you're going to stop at two? Just get anywhere between 3 and 6 cats at the same time and be done with it; easier to get them at once than try to socialize and introduce new ones into the pecking order of the home. And cats are like Pringles, you can't have just one. :p
 
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Incis0r

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Even further amendment: Why pretend you're going to stop at two? Just get anywhere between 3 and 6 cats at the same time and be done with it; easier to get them at once than try to socialize and introduce new ones into the pecking order of the home. And cats are like Pringles, you can't have just one. :p
Amendment^3: I like to play God and have the cats compete for my attention. That is why I like to introduce them one at a time.
 

tooth knockn

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Yea....

So cats.....

They really help with suicides....


Ok op.... There is your answer
 
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Greyangel6

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If I thought of dying over little things, I'd die at least a thousand times hahah. Things can be tough, yes, but it doesn't mean you can't be tougher ^^. Good luck! Hope you feel better since '09.
 
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Unfortunately dental faculty were simply taught to fix teeth in dental school, not how to teach. I have repeatedly brought this up at ADEA with no success. It seems logical that as part of a large university system, the dental school could have in service courses for the faculty on teaching methodology from the school of education which may be associated with it. Such interdisciplinary collaboration never seems to happen, although on the surface it would appear to be seamless. Instead, most faculty in service courses are simply didactics on the school policy for operative and crown preps, not about teaching. There are some faculty I have met who have taken it upon themselves to go back to school for a degree in education...cudos to them. But the vast majority of clinical instructors have no formal education training. Perhaps the leadership in the dental school classes can make this an agenda issue for faculty/student council meetings and address a clearly important shortfall.
 

Blake1e

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