urge

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Question for residents and attendings. I feel I'm working too much. Maybe I'm wrong, maybe not.

I'm averaging 55hrs/week. A saturday call puts me >60hrs/week.

How much are you working?
 

Pilot Doc

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Question for residents and attendings. I feel I'm working too much. Maybe I'm wrong, maybe not.

I'm averaging 55hrs/week. A saturday call puts me >60hrs/week.

How much are you working?
Depends on what you're making, the amount of vacation you have and your ability to work less if you want to.
 

Gimlet

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Intern, huge academic center

72.6 hrs/wk average over July.

Intern, large academic center.

31.2 hrs/wk average over July. :smuggrin: (I was in the ED this month....definitely not going to be seeing less than 70/wk for the rest of the year.)

To answer the OPs question in a more useful way, the CA-X residents here quote ~65 hrs/wk for the most part. I don't think it's enough of an apples to apples situation to bother comparing PP attending hours with academic residents, though. And I agree with Pilot that you need to take the other benefits into account as well.
 

hoyden

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Question for residents and attendings. I feel I'm working too much. Maybe I'm wrong, maybe not.

I'm averaging 55hrs/week. A saturday call puts me >60hrs/week.

How much are you working?


Pretty much the same. Weekend call is a killer, though everyone else has much easier call ( baptism time, they say ;) ). But my residency hours were very long - never shorter than 80 hours per week in the main house.
 

somedumbDO

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large academic hospital resident, this month 90 hrs/week normal month 75 hrs/week
 

Masseter Spasm

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As a resident I averaged 60-70 hours a week.

As an attending, I average roughly 55-60 hours a week. A particularly busy week (i.e. weekend call commitment) might increase my hours to >70 hours a week. Based on discussions with my colleagues in the community, I think my hours are slightly below average for a primarily hospital-based anesthesiologist (NE small city).

Unless you are looking to work exclusively in an ASC, I think you can expect to work 60-70+ hours weekly as a full time anesthesiologist in a non-academic setting.
 

AK_MD2BE

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As a resident I averaged 60-70 hours a week.

As an attending, I average roughly 55-60 hours a week. A particularly busy week (i.e. weekend call commitment) might increase my hours to >70 hours a week. Based on discussions with my colleagues in the community, I think my hours are slightly below average for a primarily hospital-based anesthesiologist (NE small city).

Unless you are looking to work exclusively in an ASC, I think you can expect to work 60-70+ hours weekly as a full time anesthesiologist in a non-academic setting.
So, how can people consider Anesthesiology a "lifestyle" field if you work 60 hours/week?
 

pgg

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So, how can people consider Anesthesiology a "lifestyle" field if you work 60 hours/week?
Because it pays well, and your time off is really off.


~65/week for most of my residency, less toward the end.

Well under 40 so far as an attending, but that's the Navy's fault for putting me in a hospital that does very few cases. I'm going to try to get that up around 60 with some 1099 work at a couple other local hospitals.
 

racerx

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I'm going to try to get that up around 60 with some 1099 work at a couple other local hospitals.
PGG, are there any Navy administrative hoops you have to jump through before 1099 moonlighting?

I'm a veteran, and was recently advised by one of my retired Navy physician friends to consider joining the Navy post-residency. If it was relatively easy to get moonlighting time in too, that would be another plus in my +/- analysis.
 

pgg

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PGG, are there any Navy administrative hoops you have to jump through before 1099 moonlighting?

I'm a veteran, and was recently advised by one of my retired Navy physician friends to consider joining the Navy post-residency. If it was relatively easy to get moonlighting time in too, that would be another plus in my +/- analysis.
There are administrative hoops but they're not too onerous. There is some variability in the limitations between commands. In general, the overall attitude toward moonlighting is positive - people recognize that there are benefits to both the physician's morale and knowledge/competency.

PM me your email and I can forward a copy of the paperwork and rules to you. At my hospital, you're limited to 16 hours/week without explicit approval for more; you can't moonlight in the 6 hours before your regular Navy job; the moonlighting can't interfere with your regular Navy schedule or call duties; you can't refer military patients to other physicians at your civvie job's practice; you can't be more than X miles away unless you're on leave. It's all pretty reasonable. Your outside employer needs to sign paperwork acknowledging that you might be deployed on a moment's notice, and that it's illegal to bill Tricare for services you provide to military beneficiaries at your civvie job.

I wouldn't join and count on doing a lot of moonlighting though. First, you never know where they'll put you, and the locums market in some areas has gone to hell - around Portsmouth, for example, it's now very dry especially for new grads. They also work a lot harder than those of us at small commands (Where I am, out in the sticks, there are lots of opportunities and my Navy caseload is light so I really WANT to work more hours.) Second, if you come in on a 3 year contract via FAP to get some loan payback, you can count on being deployed for ~7-9 months of that, probably somewhere in that 2nd year. Third, some places require you to take leave to moonlight, and coming in from civilian-land you won't have any on the books; most of us coming out of military residencies have 60+ days of vacation time accrued.

Anyway, I've been super happy with the Navy. Don't know if I'll stay in past my commitment - there are about 100 things that will factor into that decision, pro & con - but it's been a good ride so far.
 

racerx

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Thanks! I'll PM you my info.
 

dhb

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CA3 academic hospital around 56h/week this year, will probably be more next year.
 

BLADEMDA

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It's not a "lifestyle field," in my opinion.

Per hour, it's probably one of the most stressful fields in medicine.

You can find a part-time or ACS gig and make it a "lifestyle field," if you want.


:thumbup::thumbup:

It all comes down to the $$$. Those that want to earn money (better than average) must sacrifice time and family. Want that 500K plus job? Don't expect "lifestyle" along with it.
 

Licoricestick

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Lifestyle????
Hours were great at the rotation I've just finished, but when
1) the on call boss is 25min away
2) the nearest anaesthetic help of any sort is 7-10min away (but not actually on call)
3) you're a first year
4) you're doing a case solo
5) you're the only person in your community hospital with airway skills
...there is nothing "lifestyle" about that.

Anyone after a lifestyle job needs to pick one where you don't spend your days rendering people apnoeic and hypotensive with an airway they wouldn't be able to maintain on their own.
 

sevoflurane

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Out most days by 3:00pm. Get to the hospital at 6:45am. Some days home by 12:00pm some days home by 6:00pm if not on call.
On call once a week and one weekend a month. Usually home by 9:00pm. Call back rare... likely for an epidural (350 deliveries a year:)) Total time at the hospital 50 hrs. a week. Midwest has great lifestyle and reimbursment\ but only gonna be here for 3-4 years.
 

pmichaelmd

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Similar to Sevo's gig. With a recent uptick in business, I average 7 call nights/month. At the "big" hospital, that means OR until it finishes (usually between 9pm and 1am) and then OB coverage (1400 deliveries/year). We don't come in until 3pm for call days though and out at 7am post-call. Combining that with the other hospital which is a 24-hr call with usual post-call work for $$, but rarely OR cases and a few epidurals overnight, taken from home (400+ deliveries/yr), I'd say I probably work 45-50 hours/week. It varies, but that is also with 9+ wks vacation and getting out early pre-call most times.

Even though the $$ aren't as high as other gigs (we are hospital employees), we do OK.

PMMD
 

Impromptu

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PGY1 at a big academic center, which is also the major trauma and transplant center in the area. July was 60-65 hours/week on the ENT rotation. Long weekdays, but short weekend rounding and at home call (which isn't counted unless I go in). August is going to be the worst month for hours in my entire residency, easily pushing 80 hrs/week in the MICU. ER will be next, with under 50 hrs/week.
 

AK_MD2BE

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Anybody have an idea of "average" number of hours worked/week? I have heard about 55 hours/week.
Would the typical schedule look lik 6:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. plus call q5-7 days?
Thanks.
 

Pilot Doc

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Anybody have an idea of "average" number of hours worked/week? I have heard about 55 hours/week.
Would the typical schedule look lik 6:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. plus call q5-7 days?
Thanks.
The answer you provided to your question is probably reasonable. Trouble is, it's not a very useful question. Your lifestyle is going to vary wildly based on your location and income requirements. Need to live in a city that has direct flights to heathrow and make $350K. You're gonna work really hard. Happy to live anywhere on $200K? Then you can write your own schedule.
 

flashgordon

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As a resident I averaged 60-70 hours a week.

As an attending, I average roughly 55-60 hours a week. A particularly busy week (i.e. weekend call commitment) might increase my hours to >70 hours a week. Based on discussions with my colleagues in the community, I think my hours are slightly below average for a primarily hospital-based anesthesiologist (NE small city).

Unless you are looking to work exclusively in an ASC, I think you can expect to work 60-70+ hours weekly as a full time anesthesiologist in a non-academic setting.
Yes. They should remove the "A" from "ROADs". Anesthesiology is NOT a lifestyle field. Anyone seeking "lifestyle" should apply for CRNA school.
 

cozmopak

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How about in academics? How many hours are people working there?