Are you a...

  • Medical Student

    Votes: 109 72.2%
  • Ophthalmology Resident

    Votes: 20 13.2%
  • Ophthalmology Fellow

    Votes: 2 1.3%
  • Ophthalmology Staff/Private Physician

    Votes: 2 1.3%
  • Optometrist or Optometry Student

    Votes: 7 4.6%
  • Other

    Votes: 10 6.6%

  • Total voters
    151

Andrew_Doan

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Anonymous poll. I'm curious who frequent these boards. Clearly, there are people who browse but never post or register on SDN. Please respond to the poll if you come and visit here.
 

smercury

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Alright, you convinced me to finally register. I've been an occasional reader for a while. I'm finishing up my prelim medicine year now, and starting my ophtho residency at a decent midwest program this year. (I'll have to start reading again to get my knowledge base to at least 4th year med school level before I start!) Keep up the good work with the forum!
 

shredhog65

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yeah me too. never posted until now, but i do check it out sometimes. pretty solid forum. I'm a transitional year right now and will be at a great texas program in 2 months. actually, this is probably a good time to ask what (if anything) i should do before i start (reading, etc). tried to start reading the BSCS books but they're so dry. keep in mind that i'm about as lazy as i can get by this point in the year. any suggestions?
 
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Andrew_Doan

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BSCS is fairly dry. I found them to be better as my training progressed because I understood more, and then it was faster reading.

I think the most important thing for a first year resident is to be able to place their diagnoses into categories: trauma, infection, congenital, inflammatory, degenerative, and neoplastic. One way to do this is to read the Wills manual and know the basic ophthalmic disease categories. As you're reading the Wills, have an atlas available so you can look at pictures of the diseases covered.

I thought Kanski's book is useful:


I'm trying build up an archive of cases for review on the Iowa site: http://webeye.ophth.uiowa.edu/eyeforum/

My goal is to post about 100 cases/year. Over time, we'll have a complete online ophthalmic reference with photos, imaging studies, and diagnostic tests.
 

shredhog65

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thanks. i think (hope) i will get a wills manual from my program, but i might get one now anyway. anyone know where i can get one cheap or a used copy?
 

Andrew_Doan

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(nicedream) said:
What about premeds Dr. Doan?

The poll is to determine the current ratio of medical students vs physicians browsing this forum. I apologize if I offended any premeds by not including them in the current poll. Feel free to start your own poll! ;)
 

Visionary

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Andrew_Doan said:
BSCS is fairly dry. I found them to be better as my training progressed because I understood more, and then it was faster reading.

I think the most important thing for a first year resident is to be able to place their diagnoses into categories: trauma, infection, congenital, inflammatory, degenerative, and neoplastic. One way to do this is to read the Wills manual and know the basic ophthalmic disease categories. As you're reading the Wills, have an atlas available so you can look at pictures of the diseases covered.

I thought Kanski's book is useful.
I ran across a 5-book set of (somewhat large) pocket sized books: Color Atlas & Synopsis of Clinical Ophthalmology (by Wills Eye). Each of the major subspecialties is represented by a book, complete with pics (not found in the regular Wills manual). Any comments from the forum? :thumbup: :thumbdown:
 

Andrew_Doan

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Visionary said:
I ran across a 5-book set of (somewhat large) pocket sized books: Color Atlas & Synopsis of Clinical Ophthalmology (by Wills Eye). Each of the major subspecialties is represented by a book, complete with pics (not found in the regular Wills manual). Any comments from the forum? :thumbup: :thumbdown:
Those are pretty good. Know these books, and you'll have a good foundation for your PGY-2.
 

Andrew_Doan

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bump.....

bump....
 

Andrew_Doan

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bump.....

bump....
__________________
 

Andrew_Doan

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bump
 

Visioncam

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There is no category for optometrists and general public/none of the above. Both groups of people have posted before.
 

MicheleVet

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I'm a veterinarian and I read this forum because my husband is interested in Ophtho....no category for me either. ;)
 

Andrew_Doan

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okay.. more categories added! ;)
 
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