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How to be considered in-state when applying?

DCSB6

Full Member
Oct 14, 2011
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  1. Pre-Medical
    If I am applying to schools in my home state that definitely favor IS applicants, but I chose to go outside of the state for undergrad, will I still qualify as IS? My permanent residency is still in the state, but the current mailing address I have at school is not. Should I use my permanent residency address as my mailing address to make it clear that I am an IS resident, or is this not a concern to have?
     

    octupus

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    Jul 11, 2011
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    1. Medical Student
      If I am applying to schools in my home state that definitely favor IS applicants, but I chose to go outside of the state for undergrad, will I still qualify as IS? My permanent residency is still in the state, but the current mailing address I have at school is not. Should I use my permanent residency address as my mailing address to make it clear that I am an IS resident, or is this not a concern to have?

      As long as you state on AMCAS that you claim to be resident of X state and put down that as your permanent address, you're fine to keep your college address for mailing purposes.
       
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      aSagacious

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      Nov 16, 2010
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        Residency requirements vary tremendously by state. In this case it sounds like you're a resident of your current state but have maintained a domicile in the old state. Here are the general attributes that financial aid offices take into consideration when determining residency status:
        - Places where you lived for at least 6 months out of the year (sometimes less)
        - Where you were employed and/or paid taxes over the last year (or two)
        - Where you were registered to vote and/or where you voted in the last election
        - If you are under 21 (or 18 in some states) and are a dependent, where your parents live
        - Do you have a drivers' license
        - etc

        ... if the majority of these still belong to your old state then you should be in good shape.
         

        NickNaylor

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          Agreed with aSag that it's not as simple as the state you list on AMCAS. Some states have very strict residency requirements while others don't. In most cases your residency will be where you lived before college or where your parents live. Your situation might vary, though, so you should investigate yourself.

          As far as your mailing address, use whatever you want. That's pretty much meaningless for residency purposes.
           

          Catalystik

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            Schools in my state have been known to ask for physical copies of state and fed tax documents, voters registration, drivers license, license plate receipt, lease, and utility receipts to support a claim of residency. Be sure you have a paper trail for the state you decide to claim.
             

            PostHaste

            Eye Roller
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            Jun 7, 2010
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            1. Medical Student
              You should really look up the residency requirements for higher education for your state. For example, Wisconsin has very specific, very strict rules.

              In your case, you'd be considered in-state for tuition if you are
              Any student who is a graduate of a Wisconsin high school and whose parents are bona fide residents of this state for 12 months next preceding the beginning of any semester or session for which the student registers at an institution or whose last surviving parent was a bona fide resident of this state for the 12 months preceding death is entitled to the exemption under par.
               
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