LadyJubilee8_18

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Apr 15, 2005
3,792
7
34
Houston Tx/ Dallas Tx
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Now that I'm on surgery and working with adult patients, I am seriously missing pedi. Adult medicine just doesn't interest me as much, and I find myself being quite unhappy. I'm doing congenital heart surgery for my two week selective, but I wanted to know how pedi residents and attendings managed to avoid doing adult medicine rotations during medical school (if you were able to). I'll probably sign up for as many pedi electives as possible, but I feel that in my core rotations, working with adults is almost unavoidable.
 

oldbearprofessor

Staff member
Administrator
15+ Year Member
Mar 13, 2002
5,992
862
Status
Attending Physician
Now that I'm on surgery and working with adult patients, I am seriously missing pedi. Adult medicine just doesn't interest me as much, and I find myself being quite unhappy. I'm doing congenital heart surgery for my two week selective, but I wanted to know how pedi residents and attendings managed to avoid doing adult medicine rotations during medical school (if you were able to). I'll probably sign up for as many pedi electives as possible, but I feel that in my core rotations, working with adults is almost unavoidable.
For me, the key to pulling this off was to do child psych instead of adult psych....;). I did general PM&R and derm, but they weren't too painful. I did an elective month at a state school for the blind. That was my best month of medical school by far.:) (in addition to my neo sub-I of course...)
 

DarthNeurology

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Mar 20, 2008
780
10
Windy City
Status
Now that I'm on surgery and working with adult patients, I am seriously missing pedi. Adult medicine just doesn't interest me as much, and I find myself being quite unhappy. I'm doing congenital heart surgery for my two week selective, but I wanted to know how pedi residents and attendings managed to avoid doing adult medicine rotations during medical school (if you were able to). I'll probably sign up for as many pedi electives as possible, but I feel that in my core rotations, working with adults is almost unavoidable.
I enjoyed pediatrics a lot, but I also enjoy internal medicine too, I believe having a good grasp of adult internal medicne/surgery is a benefit in pediatrics because

1. There are similar basic physiologic processes operating in both adults and children, i.e. if you understand everything about anemia in adults you can apply that to pediatrics and learn what is pediatric specific. I think it is easier to learn adult medicine first, which doesn't have all the developmental changes that peds does (or at least as much as geriatrics does present some differences obviously) and then to learn pediatrics. I.e. learn CHF in an adult model and then applying that to a pediatric model. If you learn general surgery well this would help you become a much better pediatrician I believe.

2. Many pediatricians treat patients up to 21 years of age, so basically you do need to know adult medicine and also adult surgery, i.e. appendicitis in that 18 year old patient, etc. . . General surgery is excellent because you learn when patients are really sick and this is something that is really helpful in pediatric ER especially IMHO.

3. You will have adult patients, i.e. the parents!!! Having an understand of what health problems Mom or Aunt or Dad has helps when you are appraising the situation the child will be in. A parent with a sick kid takes the child's illness often times more serious than their own illnesses, so it is important to be able to talk with adults about serious medical conditions.

4. Adult medicine/surgery is sort of the end stage of what happens when pediatricians fail to prevent certain preventable health problems, so it is important to know the full range of what happens later in disease pathophysiology.

Remember that if you do match into pediatrics then this will be your only time to see adult medicine and surgery and as a doctor people will always be asking your opinion about various topics related to adult medicine. Use the time wisely to learn as much as you can. Remember that to do pediatric surgery a surgeon must first do a general surgery residency that focuses on adults, i.e. they have to be excellent with adults before they can be allowed to work on kids. You will be at an advantage if you do medicine, surgery, and ob/gyn before hitting pediatrics, don't turn a blind eye to medicine and surgery, you will probably enjoy them more when you realize that what you are learning is important, even if you just want to be neonatologists, an excellent neonatologist would have an excellent comprehrension of ob/gyn. Not to be rude, but nobody wants to work with a medical student who felt that they didn't have to learn things in other rotations/or didn't have interest in other rotations, it just comes off as a lower baseline of interest in medicine in general, be the student who is amazed and interested in everything! And then you really will be. I did a required surgery elective in SICCU, and obviously I am not going into surgery or adult medicine, but I was like wow! There is some interesting physiology going on here. When you learn a ton about the liver in adults, well, being an ace pediatric GI specialists is a piece o' cake. Think of pediatrics as the major league, and you gotta prove yourself in the minors i.e. with adult patients that don't cry when you talk to them and have much simpler development before you are allowed to touch a child.

What makes a physican phenomenal over just very good is the one that know not only their field, but also other fields as well as possible. . . . theses are the doctors who know when to consult, why, and generally have a better appreciation of the big picture.

I hope this gives you support with adults, this is how I deluded myself and it worked really good.