Got Em

10+ Year Member
May 4, 2005
648
110
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Just wondering if there was some advice other than the general ones (being there on time, show initiative, etc).

For example, a 4th year said that suturing and putting in IVs are very good skills to learn before the rotation. However, being a master at reading CTs or X-rays didn't matter much as attendants weren't pimping him. Any other advice from people who have done well?

I'm looking more for things that you didn't know before the rotation. Thanks!
 

shoal

Oinker!
10+ Year Member
Apr 24, 2005
502
127
Status
Know the differential on common complaints and the work up.. Chest pain,abdominal pain, headache, rash, extremity swelling. Emra ddx is good

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Got Em

10+ Year Member
May 4, 2005
648
110
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Know the differential on common complaints and the work up.. Chest pain,abdominal pain, headache, rash, extremity swelling. Emra ddx is good

Sent from my VS986 using Tapatalk
How would you get the emra book? I searched in their online store and couldn't find it. Thanks bud
 
Jan 8, 2015
41
50
The EMRA apps are pretty solid. EMRA Basics covers DDx and treatment for lots of chief complaints and the rash and antibiotics apps are handy also. I doubt you'll need to reference PressorDex or the peds airway app much on your AI but they're still cool to look through.
 

TimesNewRoman

5+ Year Member
May 14, 2013
2,552
2,431
Status
Attending Physician
Don't lie.
Be on time.
Be proactive.
Don't be annoying.
Don't make more work for your resident.
Don't tell the patient a diagnosis or a plan.
Get blankets and sandwiches (after asking if a patient can eat).
Ask if you can watch or assist on all procedures.
Have a reasonably differential for headache, chest pain, abdominal pain.
Don't minimize patient complaints or make fun of patients.
Be relaxed with the residents, but don't be too buddy-buddy.
Be nice to the nurses.
Do menial tasks that save he resident time (get records, track down PCP contact info, etc).
Don't say anything bad about anyone or the program.
 

Chir0nex

5+ Year Member
Aug 22, 2011
354
94
Status
Stay on top of your patients, especially if it is a quite shift. Be the first to see lab results and mention them to your resident or attending if they affect diagnosis or treatment.
Think about treatment plans and protocols. Things like Wells criteria, C-spine rules, etc... Many times if you are not sure when further testing is indicated you can find a set of rules for it.
Ask for feedback early on your shift. This is important for EM since you don;t have continuity with your attending, so ask what you can improve early, and then focus on that for the rest of the shift.
Never, never, never say you checked an exam or lab that you did not do. If you forgot to check lungs, say so but never lie. This is probably the easiest way to be blacklisted for the entire rotation

In regards to the suture thing, residents love it when you can suture well since it saves them a lot of time. That being said, if you don't feel comfortable don't do it. I would ask a the resident to sit with you for a simple lac repair and then get some extra materials to practice with since this will demonstrate a desire to learn and improve. being able to read xray and CT is just something that will be essental for your actual practice, but generally speaking will not be a source of pimping for except for the really obvious things (large pleural effusion, lobar pneumonia etc...)
 
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Docinthetrenches

EM content developer for BoardVitals
Jul 14, 2015
32
2
A large inner city ED
Status
Attending Physician
A). Show enthusiasm - but don't be annoying. Please don't be annoying.
B). Be knowledgeable - but not cocky (worse than annoying) . Know the workups for the basic stuff (chest pain, abd pain, sob, injuries, etc)
C). Try to work with numerous attendings - we talk to each other about the med students and it's better if several of us know you and think you are good. It will help the reviewer
D). Impress the nurses too. We talk to them about the med students
E). Be on time, don't ask to leave early, be helpful when someone asks you for a favour, dress appropriately (That does not mean a suit or rumpled jeans with a scrub top, trauma shears and a ****ty stethoscope).
 

CopToEM

Livin' the Dream
5+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jun 3, 2009
1,362
46
Southeast US
Status
Medical Student
I'll add one more to the great list above that I think is important and we med students sometimes forget.

Be humble. We do have a lot to offer but we also have a tremendous amount to learn.
 
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Mar 17, 2015
47
17
1. Never lie.
2. Come get me (this is the ED, if a patient has red flags in their presentation or is about to crash, I need to know NOW)
3. Act interested.