How to get excited about studying for MCAT?

wizenedone

Indeed...
10+ Year Member
Apr 9, 2008
524
2
  1. Pre-Medical
    How does one treat it more of a fun thing to do rather than a chore? I am taking MCAT 4+ months from now but having tough time starting off somewhere. I am so confused, where do I begin my MCAT studying? How to treat it more of a fun thing to do? I am not getting excited about starting to study for this. How does one build in the belief that he/she can get an awesome score (34+). I've heard from people who have done well on the MCAT that you need to treat it like a game you are trying to beat - but how??

    Edit - I want to add something: There are times I feel excited about studying for it as I think of it more of a puzzle putting pieces together but then there are times I feel so down about studying for this beast? Is this normal thing that I am feeling down? How do you overcome this feeling?
     
    About the Ads

    craniotomy30

    Full Member
    10+ Year Member
    Aug 25, 2007
    107
    0
    1. Pre-Medical
      You just have to set yourself up a schedule first, and then stick to it. To be honest, these past few months were anything but fun....but I still woke up every morning and studied hard. As to where to start, you need to organize a schedule to study a certain subject every day until you have reviewed all the content. Then start taking tests like crazy. Good luck.
       

      craniotomy30

      Full Member
      10+ Year Member
      Aug 25, 2007
      107
      0
      1. Pre-Medical
        You get motivated by picturing yourself obtaining your ultimate goal. Ask yourself, "Do I want to get into medical school"? Well, the only way to do that is to take the MCAT and do decent on it. Just start slow and while studying, picture yourself getting a great MCAT score. Thats all you can do :D
         

        wizenedone

        Indeed...
        10+ Year Member
        Apr 9, 2008
        524
        2
        1. Pre-Medical
          I am with wizdone, how do you get motivated. I mean I love biology, and I love science, but how the heck do some of you motivate yourself to study?

          I think the deeper question is "How to build a belief that you can achieve a great score?" because quite frankly if we are guaranteed a certain good score, we will do whatever it takes and be motivated to put in the time. The key is to build that belief that you can do well on the MCAT. I am interested in hearing from people who got awesome MCAT scores and to know how they went about doing this.
           

          wizenedone

          Indeed...
          10+ Year Member
          Apr 9, 2008
          524
          2
          1. Pre-Medical
            You get motivated by picturing yourself obtaining your ultimate goal. Ask yourself, "Do I want to get into medical school"? Well, the only way to do that is to take the MCAT and do decent on it. Just start slow and while studying, picture yourself getting a great MCAT score. Thats all you can do :D

            :thumbup:
             

            Artimacia

            can do stuff real good
            10+ Year Member
            Apr 30, 2008
            1,196
            0
            1. Pre-Medical
              You get motivated by picturing yourself obtaining your ultimate goal. Ask yourself, "Do I want to get into medical school"? Well, the only way to do that is to take the MCAT and do decent on it. Just start slow and while studying, picture yourself getting a great MCAT score. Thats all you can do :D

              I agree. Although it's early for my to start deep studying, I know I will eventually have to. To be honest, I like studying in general because I'm generally bored (I don't do much, :() But when I hate studying, and I feel I will for the MCAT, I do what cranio says, just picture myself doing well and believing I can. Plus, other things you can do is turning it into a game, like Jeopardy, and use mnemonics and other things like that. Also, don't dig so deep for hours, take breaks and relax. :thumbup:
               

              droyd78

              Full Member
              10+ Year Member
              7+ Year Member
              Nov 30, 2006
              33
              0
              1. Medical Student
                For me, taking practice exams has been crucial. The studying you're doing begins to serve a purpose. If there is a game aspect to this, I think this is where it comes in. Take a practice test, see where you are making mistakes, try and correct those on the next practice test you do. The fun (if there is any) is in seeing your scores rise. I also think this helps you keep focused in your studying because you can target the areas where you are weaker.

                I think the verbal section can be somewhat game-like too, especially using the examkrackers approach to pick apart question stems and answer choices.

                As for getting a good score, I can't speak with too much authority since I take the test next weekend but my practice scores have been good. I do think it begins with a mindset, though. You have to approach the thing with the attitude that you are smart enough to answer the questions. It is written to test basic science concepts but they package those questions into complicated passages to mess with you. Don't fall for their tricks. Same with verbal. Read those passages knowing you are going to see right through to the author's bias. Soon enough you will be picking out the biases behind all the passages and all those "what would the author say..." questions become a lot easier.
                 
                About the Ads

                Revilla

                New Member
                10+ Year Member
                5+ Year Member
                Jul 22, 2006
                1,069
                4
                1. Medical Student
                  I had 10 AAMC and 10 Kaplan and I worked through most of them. There are 10 AAMC that I know of, there may be older ones but what's the point, take the CBT ones bc that makes the most sense.

                  I thought there were only 8 AAMC tests -- 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. Which ones am I missing? Or did you get your hands on 1 and 2 as well?
                   

                  mterp45

                  Membership Revoked
                  Removed
                  10+ Year Member
                  Jun 2, 2007
                  671
                  5
                  1. Pre-Medical
                    I went on for seven months. I think seeing my scores increase was certainly my biggest motivation to keep fighting. However, for the times when I simply didn't feel like studying, or doing anything MCAT related, I had a really hot study partner that I would study with occasionally. There was just something about her that always got me going on days when everyone was out partying.
                     

                    nomis

                    New Member
                    10+ Year Member
                    Apr 19, 2008
                    6
                    0
                    1. Pre-Medical
                      If motivating yourself positively doesn't work, try scar tactic. Tell yourself that if you don't start studying now you'll do bad on the MCAT and every day and every hour you waste is taking another point off from your score.

                      lol, I'm just kidding. I know motivating yourself is hard and it doesn't work for everyone. If you don't have a good self-discipline, sign up for a intensive review course or I heard TPR has private tutors for each topic. I have a friend who did it (paid nearly 6000 dollars!!) and she improved from 17 to 28 and from what I know, she's a serious slacker.

                      But in the end, you just have to push yourself, HARD!
                       

                      wizenedone

                      Indeed...
                      10+ Year Member
                      Apr 9, 2008
                      524
                      2
                      1. Pre-Medical
                        If motivating yourself positively doesn't work, try scar tactic. Tell yourself that if you don't start studying now you'll do bad on the MCAT and every day and every hour you waste is taking another point off from your score.

                        lol, I'm just kidding. I know motivating yourself is hard and it doesn't work for everyone. If you don't have a good self-discipline, sign up for a intensive review course or I heard TPR has private tutors for each topic. I have a friend who did it (paid nearly 6000 dollars!!) and she improved from 17 to 28 and from what I know, she's a serious slacker.

                        But in the end, you just have to push yourself, HARD!

                        I know what you mean, but my question was more of like How do you ENJOY studying for MCAT and not making it a chore?
                         

                        QofQuimica

                        Seriously, dude, I think you're overreacting....
                        Moderator Emeritus
                        15+ Year Member
                        Oct 12, 2004
                        18,900
                        4,277
                        Florida/Fellowship
                        1. Fellow [Any Field]
                        2. Attending Physician
                          I know what you mean, but my question was more of like How do you ENJOY studying for MCAT and not making it a chore?
                          Positive reinforcement and association. I like the ideas others have posted about thinking of your ultimate goals and how you're going to succeed at getting into med school, but the problem is that those thoughts are pretty far off and abstract for where most of you are right now. Most people need something more tangible to motivate them on a day to day basis.

                          Here's my suggestion: every week, you should make a study plan, as others have said. You should also have a night off each week where you "reward" yourself for having accomplished your study goals for that week, ex. going to a movie or for dinner with your friends. Plan the reward into your schedule each week so that you always have something coming up that you can look forward to. The only thing I'll caution you about is that you need to make your schedule realistic--don't think that you can study 16 hours straight every day without fail. My experience is that however long I think it will take me to read something, if I double that amount of time, I usually wind up with a reasonable schedule. :p

                          Best of luck to you all. :)
                           

                          physics junkie

                          Full Member
                          10+ Year Member
                          5+ Year Member
                          Nov 20, 2006
                          539
                          3
                            I treated the MCAT like a game and did pretty well by your standards. In the beginning it was a chore to me until one of my close friends told me that if I got to studying a high MCAT could compensate for a less than stellar GPA. At that point I figured why not and went full steam ahead. Seeing all 33+ scores on my AAMC practice tests motivated me to go for the 40. I don't know how you could treat it as a game if you're not already motivated by your improving scores or high starting scores.

                            After I realized 35+ was easily within grasp then it became a game to get the highest score possible. I just wanted to get the highest score to show everyone that in spite of my GPA/laziness that I'm pretty ****ing smart. My MCAT didn't particularly matter because I'm applying to a caribb. school where the mean MCAT is 25. Maybe you too can be fueled by your desire to stroke your ego :laugh:.

                            I think one of the most important perspective shifts you need is that there is a finite amount of material on the MCAT. It is not a vast endless terrain of topics that you can only barely get acquainted with. You can master all of it if you put the time into it. The test doesn't require intellect--it requires time.
                             

                            DocSoMa

                            Full Member
                            10+ Year Member
                            Apr 7, 2008
                            51
                            4
                            1. Pre-Medical
                              I think with any subject, whether it's Ecology or the MCAT, I tend to brainwash myself into thinking that the subject matter is interesting. I wake up in the morning and look at myself in the mirror, telling myself "Dammit, I like studying for the MCAT. I want to prove to myself how much I know and how well I'm going to SPANK this thing." Like many things in life, the MCAT is a hurdle that I can't wait to jump over. Don't think so much about HOW you're going to get over the hump, but focus on the outcome of overcoming the obstacle and visualize success!

                              Wow, my psychology class has really come in handy...it really does work miracles if we all become optimists rather than pessimists.
                               
                              This thread is more than 13 years old.

                              Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

                              1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
                              2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
                              3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
                              4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
                              5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
                              6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
                              7. This thread is locked.