How to get extra training at work?

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crossurfingers

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Advice needed. I've been a retail pharmacist for about 10 years. I worked full time for 4 years, then dropped down to part time (3-4 days/week) for the next 3 years. Then the kids came and I've only been working 2 days a month (if I wasn't on maternity leave) for the last couple years. Although I'm fine with the basics (filling, dispensing, counseling), I'm clueless otherwise when it comes to the other tasks that need to be done (for example ordering, inventory management, MTM, etc.) Since I've been with the company I don't think they would pay for extra training, but I do feel like I would benefit from whatever they put the new grads through. I do ask questions when I can and get answers but I feel like that's just scratching the surface. Part of me also thinks that I would be a lot better if I worked more but that isn't going to be happening for at least another few years. Should I formally ask for more training or would that just be calling attention to how much improvement I need? Suggestions appreciated.

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How to get extra training? Ask your manager.
But if you are per diem or a floater.. well good luck.

My question is... What is the point to get training when you are not going to do those? (Inventory, ordering..) Just for your satisfaction?
You are working only twice a month.
Your manager might wonder why he should give u training..
 
Since when do new employee's get any training? Whether hospital or retail, from what I've seen, people are given at most, 1 - 2 days to shadow another pharmacist, and then just put on the schedule, sink or swim.

If you want to know how to do something, then just ask/watch when the person is doing it. Like ordering, find out what time the order is put in, then shadow the person putting it in (if you have to stay late after a shift to see it done, then do so.) Although as has been pointed out, if it's not something you need to do with your job, then why bother learning it? Unless you are looking into going into management, then that would make sense.
 
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Yeah, not to "pile on" but if I was your manager I would wonder why I should spend time training you to do ancillary activities that you would do at most twice a month. Not to mention, would you be able to retain all the finer points of the training or achieve any mastery of the activities? Probably not considering how infrequently you would do them.
 
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If a pharmacist asked me how to do any of that, I would actually be impressed he/she took some initiative to ask assuming it wasn't some "fake hustle" to try to suck up to me.

I believe a pharmacist should KNOW how to do it so at least to call out techs who are ****ing it up when the RXM isn't around to ride their ass
 
Advice needed. I've been a retail pharmacist for about 10 years. I worked full time for 4 years, then dropped down to part time (3-4 days/week) for the next 3 years. Then the kids came and I've only been working 2 days a month (if I wasn't on maternity leave) for the last couple years. Although I'm fine with the basics (filling, dispensing, counseling), I'm clueless otherwise when it comes to the other tasks that need to be done (for example ordering, inventory management, MTM, etc.) Since I've been with the company I don't think they would pay for extra training, but I do feel like I would benefit from whatever they put the new grads through. I do ask questions when I can and get answers but I feel like that's just scratching the surface. Part of me also thinks that I would be a lot better if I worked more but that isn't going to be happening for at least another few years. Should I formally ask for more training or would that just be calling attention to how much improvement I need? Suggestions appreciated.

You should be able to get a copy of your pharmacy operations manual. You can consult that when the need arises.
Most companies also have modules available online that you can do and re-do as many times as you like.

You should also get emails alerting you of new features in the computer system and/or when a learning module that outlines such new feature becomes available.

Hope this helps.
 
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