AlexaRae

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Hello everyone!

I am posting this thread because I am wondering how to pick vet schools to apply to, and most other threads I've seen on this topic or kind of old. I am a junior undergrad and I am looking to apply next cycle. I am planning on applying to my in-state (Minnesota!) but other than that I am having a hard time determining what factors I should take into consideration. I have a few others I am looking at but I'm hoping you guys could give me some insider info on schools, or share how you picked the schools you did. Thanks!! :)
 

Lupin21

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Hello everyone!

I am posting this thread because I am wondering how to pick vet schools to apply to, and most other threads I've seen on this topic or kind of old. I am a junior undergrad and I am looking to apply next cycle. I am planning on applying to my in-state (Minnesota!) but other than that I am having a hard time determining what factors I should take into consideration. I have a few others I am looking at but I'm hoping you guys could give me some insider info on schools, or share how you picked the schools you did. Thanks!! :)
How cheap will it be for me and do I have the pre reqs.
 

cdoconn

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Hello everyone!

I am posting this thread because I am wondering how to pick vet schools to apply to, and most other threads I've seen on this topic or kind of old. I am a junior undergrad and I am looking to apply next cycle. I am planning on applying to my in-state (Minnesota!) but other than that I am having a hard time determining what factors I should take into consideration. I have a few others I am looking at but I'm hoping you guys could give me some insider info on schools, or share how you picked the schools you did. Thanks!! :)
I made a spreadsheet, so my main focuses were cost and how cold it gets in the winter (I was born and raised in Texas so I don't do winter well).

Additional factors were how close to home it was, if it had a post DVM surgical residency, class size, if you can apply for in state tuition after a year, the size of the town/ surrounding towns, if the veterinary school's focus was related to my own (for instance Kansas State has a huge focus on beef cattle and I'm not interested in that), and if there was a commercial airline within an hour of the city in case I have to fly anywhere for emergency.
 
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As a caveat, I would be a bit wary of choosing a school based on the idea that you would apply to residency there and somehow have a better chance. I know of at least several schools that actively do NOT want to take their own students into their specialty programs because they want them to branch out. However, all of the other things you mentioned were very good.

I made a spreadsheet, so my main focuses were cost and how cold it gets in the winter (I was born and raised in Texas so I don't do winter well).

Additional factors were how close to home it was, if it had a post DVM surgical residency, class size, if you can apply for in state tuition after a year, the size of the town/ surrounding towns, if the veterinary school's focus was related to my own (for instance Kansas State has a huge focus on beef cattle and I'm not interested in that), and if there was a commercial airline within an hour of the city in case I have to fly anywhere for emergency.
 

cdoconn

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As a caveat, I would be a bit wary of choosing a school based on the idea that you would apply to residency there and somehow have a better chance. I know of at least several schools that actively do NOT want to take their own students into their specialty programs because they want them to branch out. However, all of the other things you mentioned were very good.
It was like 0.01% of my selection process. (I also though that if they had a residency program, there would be more interesting surgeries happening for clinicals, but I wasn't sure) the other factors were much larger, but thanks!


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It was like 0.01% of my selection process. (I also though that if they had a residency program, there would be more interesting surgeries happening for clinicals, but I wasn't sure) the other factors were much larger, but thanks!


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
Oh yeah, I would say that it's definitely a plus from that perspective - and also just in terms of networking. I just wanted to throw a disclaimer in there because I do know people who have weighed that ("that" being that the school having a program would give them an automatic homegrown bump in the selection process should they choose to pursue one) very heavily in their decision-making process and wouldn't want it to come back to bite them.
 
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that redhead

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Hello everyone!

I am posting this thread because I am wondering how to pick vet schools to apply to, and most other threads I've seen on this topic or kind of old. I am a junior undergrad and I am looking to apply next cycle. I am planning on applying to my in-state (Minnesota!) but other than that I am having a hard time determining what factors I should take into consideration. I have a few others I am looking at but I'm hoping you guys could give me some insider info on schools, or share how you picked the schools you did. Thanks!! :)
Consider any weaknesses (mine was low GPA) and apply to those who prefer your particular applicant profile. For me, I avoided schools that weighted GPA more heavily.
 

MathewsMD

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I've visited the campus and have family/friends nearby, so that was helpful in selecting the school I'd potentially be staying at for 4 years. But the deciding factor was cost.
 

sheltermed

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I made a spreadsheet, so my main focuses were cost and how cold it gets in the winter (I was born and raised in Texas so I don't do winter well).

Additional factors were how close to home it was, if it had a post DVM surgical residency, class size, if you can apply for in state tuition after a year, the size of the town/ surrounding towns, if the veterinary school's focus was related to my own (for instance Kansas State has a huge focus on beef cattle and I'm not interested in that), and if there was a commercial airline within an hour of the city in case I have to fly anywhere for emergency.
Would you be willing to share your spreadsheet?
 

cdoconn

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I just printed out the VMCAS document that lists prereqs. I crossed off all schools that I didn't have all prereqs for, then I crossed off all of the island and international schools (due to cost/cost of travel & it would be hard to move my son to any of those places). Then I looked at costs, which was super important. I also picked one expensive school that I felt I had a fairly good chance of getting into based on their accepted students stats. I eliminated some schools based on high incidence of tornados (I have lilapsophobia) and I excluded other based on the quality and safety of the local high schools. Then I just picked a few from the remaining schools.
 
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TerraVet

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I started by printing out the list of vet schools and their pre-reqs from the VMCAS website.

I highlighted all the schools I COULD apply to with my current pre-reqs in yellow.

I highlighted all the schools I could apply to if I only took one more class in purple.

Then I went through them all and looked at tuition--specifically looking for schools that allow you to get apply for in-state residency after a year. Circled those in black (there aren't many lol).

Then when I had my list of 7 or so, I went online to their websites and read about their curriculum. I looked at their rotations in 4th year, if they were tracking or not, if they had other programs like MPH-DVM degrees if I was interested in that. I looked to see when clinical experience started--for some schools it's ONLY books until third year, others try to implement exposure earlier. I looked to see which had teaching hospitals on campus. I looked to see if their electives were things I wanted or was interested in, and if their curriculum was case-based, lecture only, or a mix.

After that I took a reality pill and tried to figure out which ones I could possibly get into. Recognize that out of state is EXTREMELY competitive and that in-state schools are your least expensive and most likely option, unless you're truly a 4.0 170 GRE top of the class kind of person (which statistically, most of us are not).

So that's how I narrowed it down to 4--my instate, and three out of states.

Hope that helps! It's definitely a lot of work.
 
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I started by printing out the list of vet schools and their pre-reqs from the VMCAS website.

I highlighted all the schools I COULD apply to with my current pre-reqs in yellow.

I highlighted all the schools I could apply to if I only took one more class in purple.

Then I went through them all and looked at tuition--specifically looking for schools that allow you to get apply for in-state residency after a year. Circled those in black (there aren't many lol).

Then when I had my list of 7 or so, I went online to their websites and read about their curriculum. I looked at their rotations in 4th year, if they were tracking or not, if they had other programs like MPH-DVM degrees if I was interested in that. I looked to see when clinical experience started--for some schools it's ONLY books until third year, others try to implement exposure earlier. I looked to see which had teaching hospitals on campus. I looked to see if their electives were things I wanted or was interested in, and if their curriculum was case-based, lecture only, or a mix.

After that I took a reality pill and tried to figure out which ones I could possibly get into. Recognize that out of state is EXTREMELY competitive and that in-state schools are your least expensive and most likely option, unless you're truly a 4.0 170 GRE top of the class kind of person (which statistically, most of us are not).

So that's how I narrowed it down to 4--my instate, and three out of states.

Hope that helps! It's definitely a lot of work.
How did you figure out which schools you can get in state residency for after a year?
 
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VetMed1

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Hello everyone!

I am posting this thread because I am wondering how to pick vet schools to apply to, and most other threads I've seen on this topic or kind of old. I am a junior undergrad and I am looking to apply next cycle. I am planning on applying to my in-state (Minnesota!) but other than that I am having a hard time determining what factors I should take into consideration. I have a few others I am looking at but I'm hoping you guys could give me some insider info on schools, or share how you picked the schools you did. Thanks!! :)



I only looked at schools in the U.S. and then looked at about 20 I would go to if I got in. Out of those, I looked at the ones that I realistically had a chance of getting into. I looked at each school's website and calculated the percentage of OOS female students that were accepted (since I am not competing against males). Then I decided on about 10-12 schools. I recommend applying to about 10 schools that you would go to if you got in. That way you have options. I have friends who only applied to 4 or 5 schools with average stats, and they barely got into one school.

I also looked at which schools let you switch to IS tuition after the first year. Those schools are Davis, Ohio, Missouri, and Washington.

I looked at the prerequisites for those schools and saw what i had done, and what I needed to still complete for the school. I cut out any schools that required classes that I did not want to take.

I then looked at how much work it was to apply to each school (how many essays on vmcas and how many essays for each supplemental). I factored that into how much time I had in the summer to devote to my application, PS, and essays. I chose the ones that I wanted to take the time to write for.

Hope this helps!
 

Ashgirl

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I only looked at schools in the U.S. and then looked at about 20 I would go to if I got in. Out of those, I looked at the ones that I realistically had a chance of getting into. I looked at each school's website and calculated the percentage of OOS female students that were accepted (since I am not competing against males). Then I decided on about 10-12 schools. I recommend applying to about 10 schools that you would go to if you got in. That way you have options. I have friends who only applied to 4 or 5 schools with average stats, and they barely got into one school.
Could you explain the bolded? Unless I am losing it (very possible), most schools have males and females in the same applicant pool?
 

supershorty

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I'm pretty sure males & females are in the same applicant pool.

I personally looked at schools that had a lot of research work in the area that I'm interested in and tailored where I was applying based on that, since I wanted to do a PhD also. That was the main factor for my apps, followed by tuition cost at each program and whether you could get residency. I also looked at how each school weighted parts of your application; I was much more competitive at schools that weighed the last 45 credits heavily than schools that didn't, for example.

Also, not that it matters, really, but applying to 10 schools is a big chunk of money that some people (like me!) wouldn't be able to afford. IMO, it's not the quantity of schools that you apply, but understanding where you'll be the most competitive and applying selectively to those programs, i.e. if you have a lower quantitative GRE and GPA, don't apply to Davis.
 
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Elkhart

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I only looked at schools in the U.S. and then looked at about 20 I would go to if I got in. Out of those, I looked at the ones that I realistically had a chance of getting into. I looked at each school's website and calculated the percentage of OOS female students that were accepted (since I am not competing against males). Then I decided on about 10-12 schools. I recommend applying to about 10 schools that you would go to if you got in. That way you have options. I have friends who only applied to 4 or 5 schools with average stats, and they barely got into one school.

I also looked at which schools let you switch to IS tuition after the first year. Those schools are Davis, Ohio, Missouri, and Washington.

I looked at the prerequisites for those schools and saw what i had done, and what I needed to still complete for the school. I cut out any schools that required classes that I did not want to take.

I then looked at how much work it was to apply to each school (how many essays on vmcas and how many essays for each supplemental). I factored that into how much time I had in the summer to devote to my application, PS, and essays. I chose the ones that I wanted to take the time to write for.

Hope this helps!
Most (all?) vet schools consider male and female applicants to be in the same pool, so I'm not quite sure what you mean by that. Could you elaborate?

Also, I honestly think that applying to 10+ schools is expensive and excessive. I could barely afford to apply to 4 when all was said and done (VMCAS, supplementals, interview costs). Keep in mind, too, that applying to that many schools means that you will almost inevitably have scheduling conflicts with interviews, so you will likely have to turn at least a couple of interviews down. That's a lot of essentially wasted money... I mean, do it if you want and can actually afford it (it is your money), but in general, I don't think that's great advice.

Anyway, in order of importance, these are the factors I considered when applying:

1. Cost. I know we beat this horse often on SDN, but seriously... unless you happen to have one of the more expensive schools in your state (e.g. UPenn, Tufts, MWU, UMN), apply to and do whatever you need to do to get into your IS. Not only is it almost always going to be the cheapest option, but also likely your greatest chance of being accepted. If you're in a state with an expensive school or you're OOS everywhere, seriously consider moving and gaining residency in a state with a cheaper option. I know of a few classmates who basically applied to ISU as OOS on their first application cycles, got in, but then declined their acceptances to move and gain residency in Iowa in order to qualify for IS tuition on the next cycle. Every one of them is thrilled with that life choice. There are a few schools that will allow you to switch residency status partway through and there are also multiple schools that will give veterans (and sometimes even family members of veterans) IS status. Just... seriously try to do whatever you reasonably can to get IS tuition. You'll still be in debt, but you will thank yourself later. Consider this ESPECIALLY if you have undergrad debt.

2. Pre-reqs. I still do think that applicants should do whatever possible to have a fighting chance at their IS, even if that means taking classes online through another school because your undergrad institution does not offer it (my undergrad did not have an animal science or animal nutrition class, for example, let alone an animal science department), because the cost difference between IS and OOS tuition at most vet schools is still far greater than the amount you'd spend on taking that class. But I did also apply to a couple of OOS schools. That being said, I had pre-vet classmates in undergrad who applied to OOS vet schools not knowing what the pre-reqs needed were and were thus confused when they were auto-rejected from, say, OkSU without having had animal nutrition. Really do your research here before applying so that you can spend your money in the smartest way possible.

3. How well the application jives with the admissions criteria. Look at the previously accepted classes' stats at the schools you're interested in and evaluate how well your numbers stack up to the averages. There are some schools, like Wisconsin, that I ruled out based on this due to a low cumulative GPA. On the flip side, I applied to ISU and a couple of other vet schools like it largely because their academic evaluations strictly only considered science and last 45 hours GPAs, both of which were far higher than my cumulative. Which GPAs are most important to the schools you're interested in? Is GRE weighted heavily and, if so, where do their average scores generally fall? Does the school seem to value variety in experiences, or depth in the area you're most interested in? These are things you really should try to investigate and at least consider when applying.
 
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I only looked at schools in the U.S. and then looked at about 20 I would go to if I got in. Out of those, I looked at the ones that I realistically had a chance of getting into. I looked at each school's website and calculated the percentage of OOS female students that were accepted (since I am not competing against males). Then I decided on about 10-12 schools. I recommend applying to about 10 schools that you would go to if you got in. That way you have options. I have friends who only applied to 4 or 5 schools with average stats, and they barely got into one school.
 

Ashgirl

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I agree with supershorty and sandstorm on applying to 10 schools thing.... Honestly, not only is it really expensive ( and I mean thousands more expensive....), but if you apply willy-nilly to school just to get 10 schools in, you are not increasing your chances of getting in... you are just wasting money. You have to apply smartly and figure out where your application fits in best and where you would actually go to if accepted. That might be at 6 schools... or 2.
 
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TerraVet

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How did you figure out which schools you can get in state residency for after a year?
I found a list on I think mizzous info pdf. I may also have used VMCAS and or google
 

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There are rumours that some schools are "gentler" on male applicants because they want to promote more men in their vet classes.

FYI, The VIN Foundation offers a "cost of education" map that gives you estimated costs of attending vet school in for a US resident in most of the English-speaking AVMA accredited schools, including options to add the expected cost of living and expected tuition increases over the 4 years: VIN Foundation Cost of Education Map
 

cdoconn

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Hey I would love to see how you formatted and ranked that spreadsheet. PM?
I just checked, and it’s been so long that I don’t have it anymore.

Basically I did it on location, COL, OOS costs, how far north it is (I don’t do cold), etc.
 

hopefulequinedr

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I also made a spreadsheet with the info on all the schools so I could compare and see where it would be best to apply with my stats. I also looked at the number of OOS applicants the school accepted, because as previously stated, some take only like 15 students and those seats are extremely competitive.
 

emlady09

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I decided to make a spreadsheet this year to apply smarter.
Mine consists of how many OOS seats available, do they accept the GRE and if yes do they combine multiple attempts, min GPA accepted, do they require additional courses (i.e. animal nutrition), when they interview, what type of interview (MMI vs traditional), what eval criteria do they use, what GPA's they consider (overall vs last 45 vs science), any special electives different from other schools, any focus on public health and One Health, how much clinical time, tuition (IS vs OOS), if they offer IS for military, and something unique about the school I liked.

Basically just make a spreadsheet based on why you would consider the school and what factors make you a good candidate at that school.