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how to write a letter of recommendation

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batista_123

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the person that I worked for for the research part of my premed requirements is too busy to write a LOR and told me to write it myself and he will sign it.
unfortunately, I have no idea what to write!
what information do i include? do i include how many hours per week i worked there? do i include my gpa? i am so confused, please help!
 

kaybam20

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the person that I worked for for the research part of my premed requirements is too busy to write a LOR and told me to write it myself and he will sign it.
unfortunately, I have no idea what to write!
what information do i include? do i include how many hours per week i worked there? do i include my gpa? i am so confused, please help!





Wow! that is so cruel of ur PI.He is trying to make u do the hard part. Tell him to write it and u will sign it.

just my 2 cents. I love girly premeds
 
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BucsFan813

Wow! that is so cruel of ur PI.He is trying to make u do the hard part. Tell him to write it and u will sign it.

just my 2 cents. I love girly premeds

Do what you have to do...

Start off talking about how the prof knows you.

Then have a couple paragraphs that give concrete examples of the qualities you want to highlight (leadership, teamwork, compassion)

Then close it out with a strong recommendation.

The trap most people have with writing these letters is that they focus on "academics". I would mention it but not focus on it...
 

LizzyM

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Generally a letter will start out with the statement that the writer is pleased to write a letter of recommendation for Your Name Here. Then it goes on to describe how long the writer has known the applicant and the nature of the relationship (supervisor, instructor, division chief, etc).

Next paragraph usually describes what your job has entailed. Have you been promoted? Obtained a leadership or training role? Done something special for morale?

Next paragraph usually describes the attributes that you've demonstrated on the job that will make you a good student or a good doctor.

The next paragraph is optional but this is the place to put any negatives followed, if possible, with something positive that shows that you've grown. (Although Jack had trouble early on ... he quickly learned to ... and gained the respect and the admiration of ....)

The summary paragraph usually says something about your rank among your peers (among the top 5% of ....), the writer's confidence to have you as his physician, some regret that you will not continue on with some other career (laboratory or firefighter, etc) and closes with a general recommendation (I am pleased to recommend (or highly recommend, or most highly recommend) Mr. Jones for admission to medical school). Some writers offer their phone number if the reader has any questions (I've never known anyone to call ... I've made one call -- only because the letter was confusing -- a bad job of cut & paste of a letter written for someone else :oops: ).
 

Sol Rosenberg

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In addition to the good advice you got from LizzyM, I'd also suggest just doing a Google search for "Letter of Recommendation Template". You will find LOTS of sample letters, which you could then tailor to your liking. When I made that search, I even remember finding a page from UPenn Medical School which was targeted toward faculty that explained what went into a good Medical School LOR.

No, don't ask me for the link -- let your keyboard do the walking.
 
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