How would you anwser this quesiton?

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by Docgeorge, Sep 24, 2002.

  1. Docgeorge

    Docgeorge Bent Over and Violated
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    One question that I was asked during my comitee was what are the similarities and differences between allopathic and Osteopathic medicine. I anwsered by saying (short version) that we need to look at the history of osteopathic medicine. I said that Osteo. Med started out when allo med was still following the ideas of Hipocrates(sp?) and Galen. How ever as scientific method was applied to physiology, and biochem and what not it was incorporated in to the osteo. cirriculum. And that for the most part they they are the same in what the students are taught. The differences lie in how the Osteopathic Principles are applied. I said that for the most part Osteo. Phys. are taught to keep a whole picture in their heads, and to take the patients life styles and what not into consideration.

    What would some of you guys have said?
     
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  3. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Membership Revoked
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    I don't buy into that "DOs look at the whole person and MD's don't". That's crap.

    Differences:

    DOs are taught, at least from what I can tell, in a manner that integrates each portion of the education into the Osteopathic philosophy. Structure and function are interrelated. SO...when you are studying the muscles of the back...you are not just looking at the insertions and nervous innervations...you are also looking at bony landmarks for palpation. You are looking at attachment sites to get an idea of movement. So, when you see a "patient" in OPP lab you look at them and visualize the structures beneath the skin. You look for visual clues before touching the patient.

    You don't necessarily look at them as a "whole". Anyone can do that. You look at them in a more complete manner. I know what I'm trying to say...not sure if it's coming across the way I mean it.

    Taking a patient's lifestyle isn't something that only DO's do. That is something that any doctor with half a brain should do. Things can cause disease. As far as the osteopathic principles go, when your body isn't in alignment...when there are things out of whack...when the body from top to bottom isn't functioning at it's optimal potential...then you leave a window open for disease.

    Everything in the body is connected. It makes sense anatomically, physiologically, and biochemically.

    That's what I would say. Leave the "wholistic" stuff out. Get to the meat and potatoes.

    Peace
     
  4. bigtony

    bigtony Member
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    Osteopathic medicine is more than just OMM (manipulation). It also a philosophy. Don't forget about the roots of D.O.'s.
    If it wasn't for Osteopathic medicine many of us may not have had the opportunity to become physicians.
     

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