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IAUPR/Latest Tech in OD schools leads to better Optometrists?

Discussion in 'Optometry' started by TheREALoptometrist2015, May 14, 2018.

  1. TheREALoptometrist2015

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    I'd like other Optometrists and optometry students thoughts on this. NECO posted on FB a video showing their updated clinical training center with what looks like all new up to date equipment. I know other schools also have state of the art clinic training areas. Do you believe that having these advancements or at the very least some form of updated clinical equipment is essential to prepare students to be better optometrists by keeping up with industry, and helps Professors teach clinical skills better? How was it at your school?
    I graduated from IAUPR a few years back and there is no form of truly up to date technology in our pre-clinical training center, we get literally a 30-45min training on how to run OCTs (of which there is only 1 at the school and 1 at an ancillary clinic) We have old diagnostic equipment that was never once even turned on in the 4 yrs I was there, probably not since I left either. I know the perception most have of the school and its students. There are so many posts from current and past students so unhappy with their clinical education at IAUPR and I feel it might be because we see and hear that every other school seem to be making a greater investment in their students by having the latest and greatest tech and their students are well versed on how to run and interrupt results from these various dx testing and IAUPR students feel like they are stuck with crap. We feel like we missed out on a critical piece of the puzzle and end up behind when we enter our field in comparison to other new grads. DO you feel it is an essential part of clinical education and training, are IAUPR students justified in the feelings about the clinical education we're receiving? Id like honest thoughts on this. I think the only way to change for the better is to have an honest discussion about what is lacking and ways to improve.
     
    #1 TheREALoptometrist2015, May 14, 2018
    Last edited: May 15, 2018
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  3. UnicornOpt

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    I'm not super convinced you really need more than an OCT and HVF. Add a topographer if you really do full scope..

    All of these pieces of equipment come with instruction and result interpretation guides in their manual.

    A gDx, Octopus, VEP, and macular pigment density testing, etc, are nice pieces of equipment, but I doubt the average practice really can afford and profit from their usage.
     
  4. TheREALoptometrist2015

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    I think you both missed the point. I agree that in practice you many not need fancy pieces of equipment but thats not what I was referring to. I was referring to having certain diagnostic instruments for educational purposes. I dont think that it is spoiled at all and prob. 99% of the current student body at IAUPR would agree that its not spoiled. Year after year IAUPR graduates ODs that are less prepared than their stateside counter parts. I know they let in anyone with a pulse, I get it but year after year we are the lowest in every board. No one passes part 1 or 3 on their first try. Their is a significant amount of subjectivity in their diagnostic skills and students are often confused, lied, or ignored when diagnosing anything. Look at NECO's site for a sec, see that all their slitlamps are upgraded to included video of what is seen, helping not only the clinican who is teaching but the student who is learning. same for their BIO's computer system and facilities. I normal dont kick a man when he is down so I hate to comment on a school that was hit by the hurricane BUT there is something to be said about the number of complaints from students who feel that their school does not invest in their success like every other OD school. Its not being spoiled wanting to have a better clinical education. Listen they really only invest in one student a year who does a residency with them, always a native. That person is taught basic things that EVERY student should've been taught during their 4 yrs. Low vision-we suck our prof died and the replacement I hear is terrible. They get 1 day literally ONE DAY of fitting contacts training, of which we are never allowed to actually fit them on patients and learn bc the professor doesn't trust anyone and he only fits 2 days a week in the morning. Low vision parents are seen one afternoon a week. Vision therapy and related exams are done only on one day with peds mixed in. Students are left to fend for themselves. Only the resident sees interesting cases learns to use Gdx OCTs and interpretation. They have old broken down equipment that doesn't work and that has nothing to do with the hurricane.They dont even have nice "BASIC" equipment much less other advancements. If every other school invests in technology to better train their students in clinical training and puts out amazing ODs who dont think twice or question themselves in their skills meanwhile IAUPR calls their students spoiled day after day year after year and consistently has the least prepared OD's because they didn't invest in their students.
     

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