Aug 27, 2016
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Hello, first of all I want to thank you all for helping me survive med school. I'm an AMG and I'm putting together my residency application for IM. I'm bilingual and I would like to match into a program with a high volume of Spanish speaking patients. The city/location is not important. Could you please list a few programs? I appreciate it a lot.
 

drfunktacular

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Both UT-Houston and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston have a very large number of Spanish-speaking patients at their Harris Health System affiliates (LBJ and Ben Taub hospitals, respectively)

I assume UTSW has a similar volume of Spanish speakers at Parkland, although I don't have first-hand experience like I do at LBJ and BTGH


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Raryn

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It's a function of geography more than anything. Just about anywhere in the Southwest, South FL, CA as well as big cities anywhere in the country (Chicago, NY, etc) will have a significant # of Hispanics, and they (based on economic demographics) tend to disproportionately go to safety net teaching hospitals.
 

obiwan

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I assume UTSW has a similar volume of Spanish speakers at Parkland, although I don't have first-hand experience like I do at LBJ and BTGH
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Yeah, Spanish will be quite useful at Parkland. You would think that one would become quite fluent after going through Parkland but for some reason did not happen to me.
 

tantacles

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Hello, first of all I want to thank you all for helping me survive med school. I'm an AMG and I'm putting together my residency application for IM. I'm bilingual and I would like to match into a program with a high volume of Spanish speaking patients. The city/location is not important. Could you please list a few programs? I appreciate it a lot.
USC


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Jun 24, 2016
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USC


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Agree! USC has a high amount of Spanish speaking patients given its geography. But you don't have to speak Spanish to do well there since they have tons of interpreter services. Plus most of the ancillary staff speaks Spanish as well and can translate too.
 

InvestingDoc

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Went to med school in san antonio, the population is 60% Hispanic. In fact, it was so predominately Hispanic that when I played youtube videos there was about a 30% chance that the adds would be totally in Spanish.

One of my friends is in El PAso and says its even worse with up to 50% of people admitted to the hospital who do not speak any English.
 

gutonc

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Went to med school in san antonio, the population is 60% Hispanic. In fact, it was so predominately Hispanic that when I played youtube videos there was about a 30% chance that the adds would be totally in Spanish.

One of my friends is in El PAso and says its even worse with up to 50% of people admitted to the hospital who do not speak any English.
Judgmental much?
 

Raryn

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Judgmental much?
From a working perspective, if you don't speak Spanish, it is worse. At *best* if you have perfect translation, a clinic visit takes twice as long (1x for you to say something, 1x for the translator). Given the usual misunderstandings that inevitably arise, it's 3x as long.

I make every effort to treat my non-English speaking patients the same as my English speaking ones, but I will easily admit I prefer English, for efficiency if nothing else. And that's coming from someone where my grandparents don't speak very much English.
 

InvestingDoc

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Judgmental much?
You're right, I could have picked my words better. My grandparents do not speak English as their primary language so I have nothing against this sort of population. I do speak some Spanish & German but there is no doubt in my mind that things get lost in translation if both do not have a good grasps on the language used. Having a third of my census on wards that did not speak my primary language definitely created several issues as things get lost via the language barrier. Not only does the direct health of the patient possibly suffer, but when family comes and wants an update or there is a tough family discussion these things are much harder done via an translator and take excess amount of time. I didn't mean to offend anyone with my post above.