Dec 13, 2010
2
0
Status
Pre-Dental
I am a first year dental student and have been so surprised by how immature and unprofessional some of my classmates are. after being extremely frustrated for a whole semester i am wondering if anyone else is having this problem? for example, classmates will loudly snicker during class whenever another classmate asks a question, gossip about other classmates on facebook and gchat during class, and basically act like they are in highschool all over again. i never had this problem in my undergrad...what is going on?
 
Dec 11, 2010
10
0
Status
Pre-Dental
Where are you? And can you be a little bit more specific?

Are these specifically dental students or general graduate students that you work with? I think they'll always be a few bad apples but the entire class?
 

omaralt

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
May 31, 2004
686
13
Status
Dentist
I am a first year dental student and have been so surprised by how immature and unprofessional some of my classmates are. after being extremely frustrated for a whole semester i am wondering if anyone else is having this problem? for example, classmates will loudly snicker during class whenever another classmate asks a question, gossip about other classmates on facebook and gchat during class, and basically act like they are in highschool all over again. i never had this problem in my undergrad...what is going on?
ha get used to it... 4 yrs of dental school was much worse than 4 yrs of high school; mostly because in high school we had over 2000 students while in dental school your stuck with the same ~100 students (except NYU). cliques formed in my school quickly and just stick to your clique.. your going to have the mormons, the persians, the internationals, the jocks, and the nerds :) figure out who you belong to and stick with them; especially on the playground, as things may get hairy..
 

Vapor1122

10+ Year Member
Oct 27, 2006
484
4
Status
Resident [Any Field]
If I had to sum up dental school in two words:

teeth
immaturity


Actually, I found that the immature ones in the class just turned into the unprofessional/incompetent ones as we progressed from D1 to D3 (currently).
 

jwillison

7+ Year Member
Jun 16, 2010
59
3
Status
Dentist
just stick to your clique.. your going to have the mormons, the persians, the internationals, the jocks, and the nerds :) figure out who you belong to and stick with them; especially on the playground, as things may get hairy..
I'm going for the Mormon/nerd group...good people, good grades :). No but really, this has been a concern for me too. When I went to interview at the dental school my brother attends, he let me sit in on some classes and I felt like I was back in high school again. My strategy is to just try and pick the best friends possible, hard-workers, good values, and just stick with them and work my butt off.
 

dentstd

Fena Gonzales
10+ Year Member
Oct 14, 2006
1,669
15
Status
Dental Student
Why so uptight? People talk, play games, etc all the time. Some people learn best by themselves, while some learn in lecture.

Immature and inconsiderate are different things. Your classmates may be inconsiderate, but what you say don't quite suggest they're immature.
 

dentstd

Fena Gonzales
10+ Year Member
Oct 14, 2006
1,669
15
Status
Dental Student
If I had to sum up dental school in two words:

teeth
immaturity


Actually, I found that the immature ones in the class just turned into the unprofessional/incompetent ones as we progressed from D1 to D3 (currently).
This relationship is likely to be false. Maturity, people skills, and hand skills are independent of each other. It's more likely that your own ego allows you to think you're more talented than others.
 

DrReo

"Thread Necromancer"
10+ Year Member
Jun 29, 2007
3,117
13
Status
Academic Administration
I am a first year dental student and have been so surprised by how immature and unprofessional some of my classmates are. after being extremely frustrated for a whole semester i am wondering if anyone else is having this problem? for example, classmates will loudly snicker during class whenever another classmate asks a question, gossip about other classmates on facebook and gchat during class, and basically act like they are in highschool all over again. i never had this problem in my undergrad...what is going on?
Are the questions students are snickering about so removed from the topic, trivial, knowledge not pertinent to the subject at hand? In college you might of not noticed it because you were with them for a few hours a week.
 

Simiam

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Feb 3, 2007
730
0
Philly
Status
Dental Student
I'm going for the Mormon/nerd group...good people, good grades :). No but really, this has been a concern for me too. When I went to interview at the dental school my brother attends, he let me sit in on some classes and I felt like I was back in high school again. My strategy is to just try and pick the best friends possible, hard-workers, good values, and just stick with them and work my butt off.

Judging by the Y helmet you must be Mormon. ;)
 
OP
M
Dec 13, 2010
2
0
Status
Pre-Dental
thanks for the responses, well i'm glad to know i'm not the only one who has experienced this in dental school. honestly I've been trying to ignore it as much as i can...but these classmates make it pretty hard sometimes. when I say they snicker when someone asks a question, I mean they literally start whispering loudly whenever someone asks *anything* in class because they think it's dorky/annoying, and then they'll proceed to kick that person's chair for the rest of class if they are behind them. then, they'll start writing mean comments about other classmates on eachother's facebook walls, in class. i would say this is inconsiderate and immature...i'm not sure how someone could say it's not. anyways, i'm trying to follow your advice of sticking with the nice people i've met...hopefully that will work. :p
 

Vapor1122

10+ Year Member
Oct 27, 2006
484
4
Status
Resident [Any Field]
This relationship is likely to be false. Maturity, people skills, and hand skills are independent of each other. It's more likely that your own ego allows you to think you're more talented than others.
I said nothing about people or hand skills, because as you said, those are independent of maturity. Maturity and professionalism, which I did mention, are directly related.

I'll take back the connection I drew to incompetence, though. Thinking back on it, I only had a select few folks in mind when I typed that, and it doesn't necessarily work across the board.
 

cybermech

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Dec 7, 2006
270
0
Honolulu, HI
Status
Dental Student
I am a first year dental student and have been so surprised by how immature and unprofessional some of my classmates are. after being extremely frustrated for a whole semester i am wondering if anyone else is having this problem? for example, classmates will loudly snicker during class whenever another classmate asks a question, gossip about other classmates on facebook and gchat during class, and basically act like they are in highschool all over again. i never had this problem in my undergrad...what is going on?
Do you sit in the middle or near the back? The kids in the back ALWAYS have full-on conversations and don't care at all. So, if you don't want to hear it, sit in the front row :)

As for unprofessionalism, eventually, the people who really don't want to be in the class simply won't come to class. So, it'll be a non-issue.

Finally, all you can really do manage yourself. Play your own game and treat your patients with respect. However, if you see classmates being unprofessional in clinic, violating HIPAA and whatnot, tell your administrator.
 

hopefullyadent

Removed
May 6, 2010
137
0
Status
Pre-Dental
im a top 20 undergrad and im in all these premed classes...the kids are soooo immature..they broke out in uncontrollable laughter for like 10 mins when our prof said a p orbital is shaped like a sausage....i was like wow.

.THEY ALSO WENT APE SH-IT just cause the prof said, "assume that you're making brownies, everyone's favorite food" ........i was completely shocked

they are so immature and never get their heads out of the books..they also laugh when the professor said that f-ucking is part of the 5Fs of the hypothalamus

its weird cause there is this one girl i really like and she usually sits with those immature babies at the front...i sure hope she aint like that

but seriously i think it starts in undergrad and then propogates thru dental school.....this is bad news

oh well
 

Habbas

10+ Year Member
Dec 29, 2008
258
1
Status
Pre-Dental
It sounds like they just seem to be having a bit of fun (even though the brownie comment wasnt that funny).

but i figure between being mature work, volunteering and all the beaurucractic bs you put up with in undergrad, its silly stuff like that which makes me crack up :D
 

Simply_Unique

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Nov 1, 2006
105
0
Status
Dental Student
OMG I have immature classmates, too! A lot of the upperclassmen are, too. Hmmmm
 

DrJeff

Senior Member
Moderator Emeritus
15+ Year Member
Nov 30, 2000
2,832
377
Brooklyn, ct
Status
Dentist
Most students will have the epiphany at some point during d-school and realize that d-school isn't undergrad, but a PROFESSIONAL school and start acting like a PROFESSIONAL (granted some peoples interpretation of what acting professional is differs from others).

For many it may very well be the infamous run in with an older professor in a preclin lab where the professor may very well ask a student that they feel isn't "showing the respect to the profession that the profession deserves" to leave the preclin lab because of improper attitude, improper attire, etc. For others it may not happen until they have an issue with a clinical patient. But the bottomline is that for 99% of folks that enter d-school, they will have "that moment" at some point, and for most of that 99% it will happen while they're still in d-school
 

ozzie33

10+ Year Member
Apr 9, 2009
74
0
Status
Pre-Dental
im a top 20 undergrad and im in all these premed classes...the kids are soooo immature..they broke out in uncontrollable laughter for like 10 mins when our prof said a p orbital is shaped like a sausage....i was like wow.

.THEY ALSO WENT APE SH-IT just cause the prof said, "assume that you're making brownies, everyone's favorite food" ........i was completely shocked

they are so immature and never get their heads out of the books..they also laugh when the professor said that f-ucking is part of the 5Fs of the hypothalamus

its weird cause there is this one girl i really like and she usually sits with those immature babies at the front...i sure hope she aint like that

but seriously i think it starts in undergrad and then propogates thru dental school.....this is bad news

oh well
Is this really something to be that upset about? The dentists I have shadowed, both very skilled and successful, are some of the funniest guys I have met. They do their job, and do it well, but on the weekends they are the people that you want to be hanging out with, having a beer and watching sports or whatever. I just don't see why because we are in dental school we have to stop laughing at funny jokes as long as work doesn't suffer. My dentist is always talking to me and cracking jokes while i'm in for appointments. Like someone said before, if people are violating policies or putting people in danger, or talking so much that you are personally affected then, by all means say something. If, however, they are laughing at a joke that you don't think is funny, or immature, move away from them and don't get too hung up on it.
 

hopefullyadent

Removed
May 6, 2010
137
0
Status
Pre-Dental
Is this really something to be that upset about? The dentists I have shadowed, both very skilled and successful, are some of the funniest guys I have met. They do their job, and do it well, but on the weekends they are the people that you want to be hanging out with, having a beer and watching sports or whatever. I just don't see why because we are in dental school we have to stop laughing at funny jokes as long as work doesn't suffer. My dentist is always talking to me and cracking jokes while i'm in for appointments. Like someone said before, if people are violating policies or putting people in danger, or talking so much that you are personally affected then, by all means say something. If, however, they are laughing at a joke that you don't think is funny, or immature, move away from them and don't get too hung up on it.
ez for u to say if u aint lookin for a woman:laugh:
 

Streetwolf

Ultra Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Oct 25, 2006
1,801
6
NJ
Status
Dentist
Easily a quarter of my class fits into your description of "immature", but you know what? It's fun to hang around with them and it makes dental school easier to get through.

I'm not saying that everything your classmates do isn't terrible because I don't think anyone in my class would be kicking the seats in front of them or posting things on facebook, but some of you need to stop being so uptight. You'll never make it through school that way.
 

fug

Jun 5, 2010
44
0
Status
Pre-Dental
Has it occurred to anyone here that all of this gossiping about immature people is, well, kind of immature? So what if there are people in your class who say and do things you don't approve of? Tough cookies.
 
Sep 30, 2009
93
0
Status
Dental Student
Has it occurred to anyone here that all of this gossiping about immature people is, well, kind of immature? So what if there are people in your class who say and do things you don't approve of? Tough cookies.
This.
I think throughout our entire lives there are people who we are not fond of for one reason or another. Don't hang out with them.
Hang out with the people you like. :thumbup:
 

joshmonsta

10+ Year Member
Apr 17, 2008
29
0
Status
Dental Student
Me and a few buddies are always cracking jokes in class. It makes the day much more fun and managable. I suppose the tight ass gunners get pissed b/c we are not hanging on every word and taking notes like mad, but who cares. Why not have some fun in life? Just because I am in dental school doesn't mean I have to lose my personality, I just have to be professional when it is appropriate.
 

DrReo

"Thread Necromancer"
10+ Year Member
Jun 29, 2007
3,117
13
Status
Academic Administration
Me and a few buddies are always cracking jokes in class. It makes the day much more fun and managable. I suppose the tight ass gunners get pissed b/c we are not hanging on every word and taking notes like mad, but who cares. Why not have some fun in life? Just because I am in dental school doesn't mean I have to lose my personality, I just have to be professional when it is appropriate.
gb cp
 

KinKs

10+ Year Member
Jan 21, 2008
404
11
Status
Dentist
I think it is immature to expect everyone in dental school to be mature. There are all sorts of people with all sorts of backgrounds in dental school, that there are differences in levels of maturity is a given.

Futhermore, the term maturity is subjective. What exactly constitutes a mature dental student.

There were 3 D1s in my class that were 21, what level of maturity should be expected from them? In the same class, there were those married with kids and brushing 40. Who is to set the standards of maturity?

Sometimes I think Dental Students should mind their own damn business and stop looking at other peoples laptop screens during class. Often the ones who pride themselves in their self-announced maturity have a natural and persistent belligerence that makes dental school painful.
 

Mackchops

Toothy grin
15+ Year Member
Dec 9, 2003
1,316
57
San Antonio
www.uthscsa.edu
Status
Dentist
I was surprised when I hit D-school too. Some of the stuff that went on during lectures or labs would NEVER fly at my undergrad. It's simply a lack of respect -- for the person lecturing and for everyone else listening. My advice? Keep your head down, do your work, and rise above. Once you hit clinic you'll stand out -- patients can tell. However, remember that being "mature" and "professional" doesn't mean having a completely empty personality -- it means recognizing there's a time and place for everything.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mystery_Tooth

jc812

Member
10+ Year Member
Apr 11, 2006
241
0
Status
Optometry Student
I have a similar experience in Optometry school.. really, I don't really care. YOU are in school to achieve YOUR life goals and to be the best at YOUR career. What you should be concerned about is the education you receive. If that is up to par, then you are set.

Why let other students that are "immature" bother you. Besides, how they behave in the classroom is no indication of how they are in practice. Maybe those that have full on conversations in the back will be able to relate well to their patients? You never know =)
 

xtractime

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Feb 23, 2007
464
1
LA
Status
Dentist
you'll find that generally the maturity level rises once students get to clinic. there isn't any "monitoring" or responsibility that goes on in the first 2 years. once you get to clinic....you have to manage patient schedules, greet people with professionalism, handle patient payments, and interact 1-on-1 with professors, etc. Before that, all we had to worry about was ourselves (get good grades in class) and sometimes people don't realize their actions because it hasn't directly affected others yet (patients and professors). in the classroom, professionalism isn't reflected as much as when they show maturity in the clinic.....its reflection is magnified more. professors let you do more without looking over your shoulder.....patients will show up to appts and pay......you will have much more pleasant appts when patients realize that you show a sense of maturity, professionalism, and understanding as a healthcare professional, not just a dental student in the back of the classroom taking notes on a powerpoint.

and don't worry. check yelp and you will see that professionalism is a big factor in a patient's choice for their dentist. if they are having troubles with that characteristic after dental school, you will get the patients.
 

Maka

10+ Year Member
Mar 18, 2009
135
7
Status
Dentist
I am a first year dental student and have been so surprised by how immature and unprofessional some of my classmates are. after being extremely frustrated for a whole semester i am wondering if anyone else is having this problem? for example, classmates will loudly snicker during class whenever another classmate asks a question, gossip about other classmates on facebook and gchat during class, and basically act like they are in highschool all over again. i never had this problem in my undergrad...what is going on?
I hate to quote Chris Carter, but "CMON MAN." You're a D1, you'll figure out once you start working in the clinic that vast vast majority of 'immature' (by your definition) students will be all business before/during/after the patient is in the chair. If you can't hear the professor because they're so loud, thats one thing, but if you're offended by people g-chatting during class, relax. Also don't underestimate the importance of being personable and relationship building in dentistry...it's going to be hard to get your patients to come back on time (or at all) if you don't have a relationship with them(IE they like you). I bet a lot of kids you think are goofballs will be excellent at that aspect.

Dental school is such a high stress, unnatural environment, it's important to be able to have a way to lift the weight off your chest...for some people it comes out as 'immaturity'.
 

Kahr

Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
Feb 1, 2008
4,023
52
North Carolina
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I am a first year dental student and have been so surprised by how immature and unprofessional some of my classmates are. after being extremely frustrated for a whole semester i am wondering if anyone else is having this problem? for example, classmates will loudly snicker during class whenever another classmate asks a question, gossip about other classmates on facebook and gchat during class, and basically act like they are in highschool all over again. i never had this problem in my undergrad...what is going on?
Sounds just like most large classes I've ever taken through undergrad and respiratory therapy school. The only thing you mention that sounds like an issue worth bothering about is the loud snickering during Q&A/lecture, the rest of the stuff you just need to ignore.

What is gchat?

In response to some of the other comments here: it's great to have people you can be immature, be able to have a beer, play a game, etc with, but I'm not so sure I'd assume that everyone who sits there facebooking and snickering throughout class automatically falls under "cool people to hang out with", or the people who will be best with patients. Only time will tell~ ;)

No one here really knows exactly what your class is like, so ignore all the subjective and presumptuous, even nasty, comments here; you can see clearly that many of them aren't really answering your question anyway. Like someone else said, just ignore the stuff people do privately (ie on their laptops, etc), move seats away from any chatty/loud people, and then re-focus the energy you spent being annoyed by that stuff to studying or to something more productive.

Best of luck!
 

Maka

10+ Year Member
Mar 18, 2009
135
7
Status
Dentist
Sounds just like most large classes I've ever taken through undergrad and respiratory therapy school. The only thing you mention that sounds like an issue worth bothering about is the loud snickering during Q&A/lecture, the rest of the stuff you just need to ignore.

What is gchat?

In response to some of the other comments here: it's great to have people you can be immature, be able to have a beer, play a game, etc with, but I'm not so sure I'd assume that everyone who sits there facebooking and snickering throughout class automatically falls under "cool people to hang out with", or the people who will be best with patients. Only time will tell~ ;)

No one here really knows exactly what your class is like, so ignore all the subjective and presumptuous, even nasty, comments here; you can see clearly that many of them aren't really answering your question anyway. Like someone else said, just ignore the stuff people do privately (ie on their laptops, etc), move seats away from any chatty/loud people, and then re-focus the energy you spent being annoyed by that stuff to studying or to something more productive.

Best of luck!
Gchat is something you can use if you have a mail.google.com email account....it has a built in instant messenger which a lot of people in my class use to communicate.

You're from the 96744? You went to Castle?
 

Kahr

Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
Feb 1, 2008
4,023
52
North Carolina
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Gchat is something you can use if you have a mail.google.com email account....it has a built in instant messenger which a lot of people in my class use to communicate.

You're from the 96744? You went to Castle?

Ahah, I didn't know you could do that with gmail. Yeah, Heeia, King, Castle ('01)...->>Queens College NY (Which ironically are also the "Knights") :)
 
Aug 25, 2011
103
0
Status
Dentist
no kidding... kids these days. When I was in school the students showed up with ridiculous haircuts, wrinkled shirts, no neckties, jeans, and even wrinkled scrubs.

some even play around on their laptop during class, the most dis-respectful thing one can do to a lecturer.
 
Oct 3, 2010
206
0
St. Peter, Minnesota
www.facebook.com
Status
Dental Student
no kidding... kids these days. When I was in school the students showed up with ridiculous haircuts, wrinkled shirts, no neckties, jeans, and even wrinkled scrubs.

some even play around on their laptop during class, the most dis-respectful thing one can do to a lecturer.
You're uptight about wrinkled scrubs?
Some of you people in here are way too high strung.
 
Jun 2, 2010
84
0
Status
Pre-Dental
You're uptight about wrinkled scrubs?
Some of you people in here are way too high strung.
:laugh::thumbup: Although funny, it's all about presentation, and looking a mess is unprofessional. I don't care how good you are clinically. Your clinic skills are not what patients see first, as shallow as that is, it's you. Why do you think some dental schools want a quaint little 2x2, lets get real. If I'm a patient I'm not going to want the disheveled looking D-3 student. Give me the one that despite having to stay up all night to study, still found 10 seconds to iron his/her scrubs, please.
 

wired202808

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Aug 14, 2006
2,463
9
Status
:laugh::thumbup: Although funny, it's all about presentation, and looking a mess is unprofessional. I don't care how good you are clinically. Your clinic skills are not what patients see first, as shallow as that is, it's you. Why do you think some dental schools want a quaint little 2x2, lets get real. If I'm a patient I'm not going to want the disheveled looking D-3 student. Give me the one that despite having to stay up all night to study, still found 10 seconds to iron his/her scrubs, please.
Last time I checked a patient can't complain or be switched to another D3 or D4 based on scrub preference. If i'm busy and my scrubs are wrinkled oh well... I'll worry about it in the real world... not during the clinic where I'm supposed to be gaining experience.

Seriously a few people on here are too uptight, focus on your own problems and make sure your game is in check. No need to complain about other people and their immaturity.
 
Mar 20, 2010
429
1
Status
Pre-Dental
Last time I checked a patient can't complain or be switched to another D3 or D4 based on scrub preference. If i'm busy and my scrubs are wrinkled oh well... I'll worry about it in the real world... not during the clinic where I'm supposed to be gaining experience.

Seriously a few people on here are too uptight, focus on your own problems and make sure your game is in check. No need to complain about other people and their immaturity.
As I get older, the more I realized the importance of minding the little things. Scrub appearance means nothing in and of itself. However, how one handles the little things is often a good indicator of bigger things.

Also, patient perception is very important. How a patient perceives you is just as important as the care that you give them. You could be the greatest clinician in the world and it wouldn't matter if the patients didn't perceive you as such.
 

Bereno

Smoking Monkey
7+ Year Member
Apr 15, 2011
1,986
472
Cincinnati, OH
Status
Resident [Any Field]
As I get older, the more I realized the importance of minding the little things. Scrub appearance means nothing in and of itself. However, how one handles the little things is often a good indicator of bigger things.

Also, patient perception is very important. How a patient perceives you is just as important as the care that you give them. You could be the greatest clinician in the world and it wouldn't matter if the patients didn't perceive you as such.
So, you are saying it is not the act of ironing your scrubs, but the fact that you are willing to take the time to do it that makes the difference?
 

wired202808

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Aug 14, 2006
2,463
9
Status
As I get older, the more I realized the importance of minding the little things. Scrub appearance means nothing in and of itself. However, how one handles the little things is often a good indicator of bigger things.

Also, patient perception is very important. How a patient perceives you is just as important as the care that you give them. You could be the greatest clinician in the world and it wouldn't matter if the patients didn't perceive you as such.
Too many assumptions here my friend. What you perceive has zero correlation between what a patient perceives. I wouldnt lose sleep over scrubs in d-school. However, I do plan to look sharp when I work professionally.
 
Jun 2, 2010
84
0
Status
Pre-Dental
Last time I checked a patient can't complain or be switched to another D3 or D4 based on scrub preference. If i'm busy and my scrubs are wrinkled oh well... I'll worry about it in the real world... not during the clinic where I'm supposed to be gaining experience.

Seriously a few people on here are too uptight, focus on your own problems and make sure your game is in check. No need to complain about other people and their immaturity.

When was the last time you checked? Better yet, where have you checked? Or the last time you were even in a professional dental environment, with a license to provide treatment?Professionalism is huge, and how you look, or as boreno questioned, the fact that you even would put in the time to iron your scrubs, can say A LOT about your work ethic. Got patients? I'd invest in an iron, you're going to need it.:xf:
 

wired202808

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Aug 14, 2006
2,463
9
Status
When was the last time you checked? Better yet, where have you checked? Or the last time you were even in a professional dental environment, with a license to provide treatment?Professionalism is huge, and how you look, or as boreno questioned, the fact that you even would put in the time to iron your scrubs, can say A LOT about your work ethic. Got patients? I'd invest in an iron, you're going to need it.:xf:
I worked in a professional environment for many years. I dont need to iron my scrubs for patients in a clinic. Most of them wont care and it doesnt matter. I already agreed that in a real practice esp my own, I'll be super sharp. But I dont intend on wasting my time when I dont have any for patients in a clinic. Again they probably dont care and even if they do they care way more about their oral health than my clothes. No need to be a worry wart... minor details are important when you're running a business.. not as a poor student with zero time and other important commitments.

Your experience is clearly from a professional office setting... not a dental school. Those two are separate worlds
 
Jun 2, 2010
84
0
Status
Pre-Dental
I worked in a professional environment for many years. I dont need to iron my scrubs for patients in a clinic. Most of them wont care and it doesnt matter. I already agreed that in a real practice esp my own, I'll be super sharp. But I dont intend on wasting my time when I dont have any for patients in a clinic. Again they probably dont care and even if they do they care way more about their oral health than my clothes. No need to be a worry wart... minor details are important when you're running a business.. not as a poor student with zero time and other important commitments.

Your experience is clearly from a professional office setting... not a dental school. Those two are separate worlds
Old habits die hard my friend.

Well in order to get to an office setting, I had to go through a school setting, obviously, as indicated in my username, with patients, requirements, work ethic, etc. Were there mornings I was so tired, woke up and couldn't tell the difference between my scrub top and bottom? Yes. Because at that moment passing oral path. and pharmacology were the only important things in this world. So what I'm saying is, yes of course, there will be other pressing and more important things than ironing your scrubs for the day, but that's not necessarily an excuse to neglect the "little things" either, because they make a big difference! But from experience in and out of school I have realized how important professionalism is, as I'm sure you have, given your experience. But this is a different schoolyard. S'all I'm sayin.
 

wired202808

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Aug 14, 2006
2,463
9
Status
Old habits die hard my friend.

Well in order to get to an office setting, I had to go through a school setting, obviously, as indicated in my username, with patients, requirements, work ethic, etc. Were there mornings I was so tired, woke up and couldn't tell the difference between my scrub top and bottom? Yes. Because at that moment passing oral path. and pharmacology were the only important things in this world. So what I'm saying is, yes of course, there will be other pressing and more important things than ironing your scrubs for the day, but that's not necessarily an excuse to neglect the "little things" either, because they make a big difference! But from experience in and out of school I have realized how important professionalism is, as I'm sure you have, given your experience. But this is a different schoolyard. S'all I'm sayin.
Anyone that can graduate a professional program like dental school (not knocking hygiene but thats 2 yr associates program) can learn to iron scrubs. That being said theres no indication that a person has to iron scrubs in order to be able to do so later. I like to focus on important things first like my classes, GPA, drill speed, patient intake, etc rather than iron scrubs. I simply wont do it until I get into private practice. Unless I get a special comment from a patient or professor that I "have" to do it.

All i'm saying is that past performance does not indicate future performance in anyway. I intend on keeping my priorites in check during d-school and afterwards. During school the most important thing is classes + clinic, after school I can worry about soft factors like scrub ironing :)