info. please

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by curiousgeorge, May 27, 2001.

  1. curiousgeorge

    curiousgeorge New Member

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    I just graduated from high school, and im going to have the summer off to work and relax. I was just wondering if anyone knew of some good reference material to look over in my free time. I plan on being a psychiatrist someday, and if there was any preperation or information that I could use to get ahead for college and later on, I would love to know where or what to get. I mainly am asking for good books, etc., that would help me with my pre-med courses and give me an edge. Thx for any help.
     
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  3. ckent

    ckent Banned
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    go to the bookstore and get any book that talks about getting into med school or med school admissions processes. The process is tricky and you have to jump through a few hoops to get in, they all basically say the same thing, above all, do well in school, major in what you want to, and get involved in extracurriculars and community service. I have found that a lot of people don't bother to find out what med schools want of their applicants until their junior year when it is often too late to change anything. good luck.
     
  4. gower

    gower 1K Member

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    Enjoy your summer. As soon as you start the college you chose, or even earlier if possible, find and make an appointment with your premedical advisor who should be able to tell you which required courses to take and when at YOUR college.

    Psychiatry is a medical speciality; you study it in a residency program AFTER you earn the MD. Since many students change their minds on specialty as they move through the medical school clinical curriculum, keep an open mind on specialty choice and concentrate on earning good enough undergraduate grades and honing your test-taking skills for the MCAT so that you will be accepted to medical school in the first place.
     

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