May 18, 2020
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I have seen this question thrown around quite a bit on this forum, but I wanted to inquire into how limited/stringent the process is on identification. I identify with a non-federally recognized tribe and have no tribal ID- but I have done extensive work and have very much lived and been coded as Native (to Mexico). A lot of my people have been persecuted by various colonizing states so recognition and centralized cultural agencies are sparse, but I still do my part to aid in honoring/reviving my own family history. My main concern is being grouped with applicants that are probably dishonest etc. What are the follow-up questions they will ask- and how will they interpret my situation?
 
Dec 3, 2019
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I have seen this question thrown around quite a bit on this forum, but I wanted to inquire into how limited/stringent the process is on identification. I identify with a non-federally recognized tribe and have no tribal ID- but I have done extensive work and have very much lived and been coded as Native (to Mexico). A lot of my people have been persecuted by various colonizing states so recognition and centralized cultural agencies are sparse, but I still do my part to aid in honoring/reviving my own family history. My main concern is being grouped with applicants that are probably dishonest etc. What are the follow-up questions they will ask- and how will they interpret my situation?

I don't think they actually make an investigation into who's what. Ethically and personally I wouldn't identify as anything if I was white passing because as such imo you are shielded from a lot of the discrimination that goes around. Aside from that I think it's honorable to identify with your tribe and it might be an unique angle to write about on your PS being that you actually live the struggle.
 
May 18, 2020
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I don't think they actually make an investigation into who's what. Ethically and personally I wouldn't identify as anything if I was white passing because as such imo you are shielded from a lot of the discrimination that goes around. Aside from that I think it's honorable to identify with your tribe and it might be an unique angle to write about on your PS being that you actually live the struggle.

Yeah I think it gets a little complex when white Natives insert themselves into some dialogues like that. However, I dont present as white- but I still worry about the possibility of being screened out solely because they perceive dishonesty due to lack of card/federal tribe. Thanks for the perspective!
 
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Dec 3, 2019
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Yeah I think it gets a little complex when white Natives insert themselves into some dialogues like that. However, I dont present as white- but I still worry about the possibility of being screened out solely because they perceive dishonesty due to lack of card/federal tribe. Thanks for the perspective!
Np. I think that you should definitely write about that federal ID issue into your PS.
 

chocomorsel

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Yeah I think it gets a little complex when white Natives insert themselves into some dialogues like that. However, I dont present as white- but I still worry about the possibility of being screened out solely because they perceive dishonesty due to lack of card/federal tribe. Thanks for the perspective!
What are White natives? Mixed race?
 

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I have seen this question thrown around quite a bit on this forum, but I wanted to inquire into how limited/stringent the process is on identification. I identify with a non-federally recognized tribe and have no tribal ID- but I have done extensive work and have very much lived and been coded as Native (to Mexico). A lot of my people have been persecuted by various colonizing states so recognition and centralized cultural agencies are sparse, but I still do my part to aid in honoring/reviving my own family history. My main concern is being grouped with applicants that are probably dishonest etc. What are the follow-up questions they will ask- and how will they interpret my situation?
Get the tribal card

The service alone for NA communities will be worth a lot to service loving schools.

Coded as native to Mexico? What does this mean?

Is your ethnicity Hispanic? Mexican? Or a native culture south of the border? I don't know how med schools view the latter.
 
May 18, 2020
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Get the tribal card

The service alone for NA communities will be worth a lot to service loving schools.

Coded as native to Mexico? What does this mean?

Is your ethnicity Hispanic? Mexican? Or a native culture south of the border? I don't know how med schools view the latter.

A tribal card isnt a thing for the community I am from. To clarify, I am coded as Native (i.e. my way of saying I don't look white and have been perceived as a brown Native). I am Mexican but am almost exclusively Indigenous in my lineage with my entire family from one Pueblo. The issue is just a lot more complex on my end coming from a tribe that was/is not viewed favorably in Mexico or the U.S and thus there isn't much option for Tribal ID or reservation community, but there is an alive culture and other Nations I work with by proximity (and I lead the Indigenous initiatives at my campus). I just don't want that to be perceived as a trick and thus be grouped with disingenuous non-Natives.
 
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Wahkoon

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Native MS2 here.

I think that you should select Native if that is how you identify. Federal recognition is a complicated subject, which is even more complicated with non-US tribes/pueblos or communities in both countries (eg, Tohono O'odham or Yaqui); this is apparent to people familiar to Indigenous history in the US, but may require some explanation for those that are not. If you have a genuine connection to your community and that is evidenced in your activities and essays, then I think that will corroborate that. On the topic of essays, it would be good to mention your activities in your community and the lack of federal recognition in your diversity essay.

For what it's worth, I am enrolled in a federally recognized tribe, but was not interrogated on the fact. This may have been due to my extensive community work, essays, etc.
 
May 18, 2020
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Native MS2 here.

I think that you should select Native if that is how you identify. Federal recognition is a complicated subject, which is even more complicated with non-US tribes/pueblos or communities in both countries (eg, Tohono O'odham or Yaqui); this is apparent to people familiar to Indigenous history in the US, but may require some explanation for those that are not. If you have a genuine connection to your community and that is evidenced in your activities and essays, then I think that will corroborate that. On the topic of essays, it would be good to mention your activities in your community and the lack of federal recognition in your diversity essay.

For what it's worth, I am enrolled in a federally recognized tribe, but was not interrogated on the fact. This may have been due to my extensive community work, essays, etc.

Thanks a lot for the insight. Do you think you weren't interrogated because of federal recognition documentation you provided? The connection I have is what it is- it isn't fabricated but it definitely feels like I would have to make a case for admissions to not discredit it. I mention my activities in the work/activities sections and passingly in my essays- but only afterwards began to worry about this issue of not having some tribal ID or organized reservation contact. I am just considering leaving it out on my AMCAS app to avoid any drama.
 

Wahkoon

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Thanks a lot for the insight. Do you think you weren't interrogated because of federal recognition documentation you provided? The connection I have is what it is- it isn't fabricated but it definitely feels like I would have to make a case for admissions to not discredit it. I mention my activities in the work/activities sections and passingly in my essays- but only afterwards began to worry about this issue of not having some tribal ID or organized reservation contact. I am just considering leaving it out on my AMCAS app to avoid any drama.
I always have my tribal ID in my wallet and am ready to provide it at anytime, but I never actually had to provide it for AMCAS, matriculation, etc. Not sure if this is standard, but it was my experience; I can only speculate that it was because my history and experiences.

I think it would be fine for you to put AI/AN on AMCAS since it sounds genuine from what you've said so far. Also, on AMCAS it is listed under "self-identification" and if that how you identify, then I think that is valid.
 
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I always have my tribal ID in my wallet and am ready to provide it at anytime, but I never actually had to provide it for AMCAS, matriculation, etc. Not sure if this is standard, but it was my experience; I can only speculate that it was because my history and experiences.

I think it would be fine for you to put AI/AN on AMCAS since it sounds genuine from what you've said so far. Also, on AMCAS it is listed under "self-identification" and if that how you identify, then I think that is valid.
Do other Nations really give out tribal cards? I have my CIB, but don't carry around a tribal card. I was also never asked for this through AMCAS.
 

ScrubsnScalpels

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I have seen this question thrown around quite a bit on this forum, but I wanted to inquire into how limited/stringent the process is on identification. I identify with a non-federally recognized tribe and have no tribal ID- but I have done extensive work and have very much lived and been coded as Native (to Mexico). A lot of my people have been persecuted by various colonizing states so recognition and centralized cultural agencies are sparse, but I still do my part to aid in honoring/reviving my own family history. My main concern is being grouped with applicants that are probably dishonest etc. What are the follow-up questions they will ask- and how will they interpret my situation?
I have my CDIB and tribal card, but regardless this type of proof was never requested at my school (and probably wouldn't be appropriate to force it anyway). I was also on the interview committee this year for my school, and interviewed Indigenous students. This was never something we asked, and was never requested when the applicants were presented to the selection committee (which I also sat on). Just mark what you identify as and don't stress this technicality.

Now, where you will run into issues is if you want to apply to the IHS health professions scholarship program. I did have to submit proof of citizenship to them.
 
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