Jun 2, 2018
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So I’m really bad at interviewing. Just the formality of it gets to me somehow and I struggle to articulate my thoughts and be comfortable. I have 2 coming up. Anyone have any advice / tips? My app is good but I don’t want my bad interviews to screw up my chance of getting in. Would appreciate advice on how to thoroughly prep in general and also on how to calm my nerves as I also don’t really have a lot of interview experience.
 

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Goro

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So I’m really bad at interviewing. Just the formality of it gets to me somehow and I struggle to articulate my thoughts and be comfortable. I have 2 coming up. Anyone have any advice / tips? My app is good but I don’t want my bad interviews to screw up my chance of getting in. Would appreciate advice on how to thoroughly prep in general and also on how to calm my nerves as I also don’t really have a lot of interview experience.
Does your school have a career counseling center? If so, ask for help with interview tips.

Practice makes perfect. Go through the Interview feedback section and give some random questions from there to acquaintances who would agree to interview you (NOT friends or family...they'll be too biased).

IF you know anyone who works in an HR setting, ask them for advice as well.

good luck!

Also see these:
 
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Jun 2, 2018
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Thank you guys! Unfortunately I have graduated and live away from college now but I will definitely look through those links and practice with acquaintances.
 

Cornfed101

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(NOT friends or family...they'll be too biased).
I am going to disagree with you somewhat. I think you should definitely focus your practice with acquaintances (or even strangers), but there are benefits to practicing with family or friends. When I went through questions with my wife she pointed out nervous ticks and filler words that I used. She was also able to call me on BS that I was trying to sneak into my story.
 
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I would have bullet point outlines in my head of answers to basic questions (e.g., why medicine?; why XYZ school? tell me about this aspect of your application?). Once I had thought through what I wanted to say to the obvious questions, I would practice with members of my kitchen cabinet until I got as comfortable as possible. I would also remember that interviewing is a bit stressful for everyone--somewhat like taking a test at school--but that stress means that you care. It does not have to be debilitating, just as your test anxiety didn't stop you from testing well. Good luck.
 
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Oct 19, 2018
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First : "Don't Panic."
Second : Do not watch There's Something About Mary and think that's a good way to calm your nerves
Third : As others have suggested, go over a list of common type of questions and outline a response for them.
Fourth : Practice, either outloud or in your head responses so they come out naturally without a lot of "eers," and "aaahs" and awkward pauses.
Fifth : Imagine the interviewer naked, and then them farting.. that'll bring them back down to human level.
 
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Cornfed101

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I'm going to borrow what I posted in the Premed DO forums awhile back.

Take out a sheet paper (or start a word document) and start listing the "common" questions:
  • Tell me about yourself
  • Why did you choose this school?
  • Why medicine?
  • Etc.
A good list of questions to get you started:


Talk yourself through these questions and start jotting down key points to each answer. Don't write your answers down verbatim, this will work against you if you do. The point of this is to get an idea of what you want to say.

Now, practice your answers out loud whenever you get a chance. The goal is to make sure your answers sound natural/conversational. Some answers sound good on paper, but sound really stupid or robotic when spoken. It helps to have a friend record your answers and critique your performance as you go.

For each answer make sure you hit all the main points. Challenge yourself and see if you can hit those main points in different ways. I had about 5 answers for each 'big' question I could think of (why this school? Why become a doctor? etc.). On interview day I just mixed and matched depending on the situation.

Your answers should reflect the school's mission in some way, so be sure to memorize the school's mission statement/visions/goals. If you're interviewing for DO schools, then be well-versed in the osteopathic tennets, the history of osteopathic medicine, and Andrew T. Still. For example, most DO schools heavily emphasize primary care, so be sure to mention an interest in those fields IF YOU HAVE THE EXPERIENCE TO BACK IT UP. Don't say you're interested in "x" field when you have 0 hours in it. It raises a huge red flag.

During the interview, you'll have adrenaline surging through your veins. Practice breathing exercises, AND SLOW DOWN. Talking like you're an auctioneer won't help you. Brief pauses in your answer, if done correctly, will make it seem like you're putting together a well-thought out answer instead of going for the first thing that comes to your head. "Umm" is the sound in dumb. Stop saying "like."

If you're given an ethical question, start off by considering both sides of the argument and THEN take a side. Be sure to support your argument. For all other questions, just answer truthfully and try to relate back to your pre-med experiences.
  • Example question: what specialty do you see yourself in?
  • Good: I can see myself in X specialty because back when I was scribing for this particular doctor ...
  • Bad: I want to be in X specialty because it has always been a dream of mine to be in this particular field ...
Make eye-contact, smile/laugh (when appropriate), nod, sit up straight, make hand gestures as you talk. Reflect the tone of the interviewer and know when to be serious or slightly relaxed. Never make it seem like you're intimidated. Your goal is to take control of the conversation.

For God's sake, don't give your interviewers a wet, wimpy handshake. Stand up straight, extend your arm before they do, and give them your firmest handshake while thanking your interviewers. It will go long way.
 
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First of all CONGRATULATIONS!! Two interviews!! That's so exciting, your application must have been strong and you should be really proud! You are so close and you have just this last step to go!

Here is another list of common questions and types of questions for you to prepare in addition to the one above. Nerves are totally normal. The more you know about yourself and your experiences, and can prepare and practice the better it will be. You got this.

Do you know what kind interviews they will be? MMI traditional panel etc? There are some different kinds of strategies to practice for different kinds of interviews
 
OP
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Jun 2, 2018
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First of all CONGRATULATIONS!! Two interviews!! That's so exciting, your application must have been strong and you should be really proud! You are so close and you have just this last step to go!

Here is another list of common questions and types of questions for you to prepare in addition to the one above. Nerves are totally normal. The more you know about yourself and your experiences, and can prepare and practice the better it will be. You got this.

Do you know what kind interviews they will be? MMI traditional panel etc? There are some different kinds of strategies to practice for different kinds of interviews
Thank you! They are all traditional which I think I prefer over the others. But thank you all of you for your feedback. I believe practicing a ton without becoming scripted / robotic will help me a considerable amount.
 
Mar 7, 2019
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Thank you! They are all traditional which I think I prefer over the others. But thank you all of you for your feedback. I believe practicing a ton without becoming scripted / robotic will help me a considerable amount.
Haha I just told someone else I prefer MMI because they're more fun :p but hey they're all interviews in the end, as long as you learn the different types of questions and how to approach them. Best of luck!!
 
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