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Ben Chudner

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http://www.odwire.org/petition/petition.php?pt=5

If you haven't already heard, organized optometry (AOA) is wanting to make 'voluntary' board certification a reality. Please read the following petition to decide for yourself. Do you want to pay for more testing?
For the record, this was not initiated by the AOA. I would seriously be careful taking the word of the many disgruntled OD's on ODWire.

Board Certification will become a reality, which is upsetting to me. The senate has made the recommendation that all medicare providers be board certified. This is not mandatory yet, but the government is looking for a way to save medicare from bankruptcy, and it appears that the way to do that is reduce the amount of providers. Based on that recommendation, ARBO decided it would push forward with board certification. ARBO has the ability to work directly with the states to make that happen. In my opinion, ARBO only cares about the extra revenue board certification will generate. The AOA stepped in because it felt that if ARBO was going to push this on us, the profession better have a voice and the original proposal by ARBO was ridiculous.

The bottom line is that even if the AOA membership votes against this, as I expect they will, ARBO still can force the issue and they do not answer to a membership. If ARBO doesn't go forward with this, and the government ends up dropping all non-board certified providers from medicare, OD's are screwed.
 

sniklegem

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To relay something to all students who may come across this petition, please read the below letter from the current AOSA National President.

*****************************************

April 24, 2008
Dear Optometry Student,
Within optometry, board certification is an exciting and controversial topic. The profession has developed the Joint Board Certification Project Team (JBCPT) to answer the question: “If optometry had a board certification process, what would it look like?” Many articles have been written to keep the profession updated on the progress of the JBCPT. Please read these and inform yourself about this topic. It is important to understand that at this point the American Optometric Student Association neither supports
nor opposes board certification, however it DOES support the JBCPT and their process of evaluating this topic.

On various optometric blog sites, petitions have been posted attempting to stop the JBCPT from answering the above question. These petitions are targeting students in the hope that we will be less informed. Please do not be hasty into signing them without researching the topic thoroughly. I would request that each student gather all the facts and allow the process to continue. By signing one of these petitions we will only cause a divide
within the profession.

Thanks again for your confidence in our association. Please feel free to contact your AOSA Trustee or Trustee-Elect if you have any further questions.

Sincerely,

President
American Optometric Student Association
 
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Meibomian SxN

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What puzzles me is the fact that you can still be a practicing Ophthalmologist and not be board certified. I see it all the time in their classifieds, hiring for a Board cert or Board eligible oMD.

They should concentrate more on getting equal TPA rights in all 50 states and having some injectables and laser procedures done. To me this is still falls under the umberlla of primary care.
 

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EVERY other doctorate level independent profession (medicine, dentistry, podiatry, etc...) has Board Certification. Most health care professionals recognize this as being a level of advanced certification (past entry level licensure.) Congress may make it "mandatory" to be board certified to recieve rembursement from Medicare and Medicaid. Optometrists need to step up to the plate and create a national board certification instead of worrying about paying another $500.00 a year or whatever it may be. OD's are the ONLY profession (among independent.doctorate level prescribers) that dont have it.......COME ON!




note: NBEO is NOT Board certification. Board certification is advanced competency BEYOND entry level licensure. IT DOES MEAN SOMETHING!
 

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EVERY other doctorate level independent profession (medicine, dentistry, podiatry, etc...) has Board Certification. Most health care professionals recognize this as being a level of advanced certification (past entry level licensure.) Congress may make it "mandatory" to be board certified to recieve rembursement from Medicare and Medicaid. Optometrists need to step up to the plate and create a national board certification instead of worrying about paying another $500.00 a year or whatever it may be. OD's are the ONLY profession (among independent.doctorate level prescribers) that dont have it.......COME ON!




note: NBEO is NOT Board certification. Board certification is advanced competency BEYOND entry level licensure. IT DOES MEAN SOMETHING!

Many people do not want the extra hassle of doing this certification.
 

drbizzaro

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There was one excellent article written in Review of Optometry, where a well seasoned OD wrote how we as a profession do not really need any new certification, and that it only is a way to give more money to various entities.
 

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AGAIN,


In a world where perception is reality.....EVERY OTHER Independent Doctorate level health care provider HAS a Board Certification process!!!! This is what other medical practitioners use as a measuring stick and what the public understands. Eventually the insurers and medicare/medicaid with require it for reimbursement. Optometry needs to "fit in" in this regard. When I tell other practitioners that we don't have it they think that is ridiculous.
 

KHE

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AGAIN,


In a world where perception is reality.....EVERY OTHER Independent Doctorate level health care provider HAS a Board Certification process!!!! This is what other medical practitioners use as a measuring stick and what the public understands. Eventually the insurers and medicare/medicaid with require it for reimbursement. Optometry needs to "fit in" in this regard. When I tell other practitioners that we don't have it they think that is ridiculous.

I strongly disagree with this.

1) Board Certification will almost certainly NOT get us any more access to medical plans and will almost certainly NOT get us any more reimbursement from the plans we DO have access to. The net result is yet another expensive, time consuming hoop for ODs to jump through that will result in us making the same money, with the same limited access. At BEST, it will do nothing. At WORST, it will be just another thing for VSP or Eyemed to require ODs to do so that they can continue to reimburse us $40 an exam. I have never ever ONCE in my almost 10 years in this business been denied access to any medical plan, hospital, nursing home, etc. etc. because I wasn't board certified or board eligible.

2) Optometric board certification as it is being discussed will not be comparable in any way, shape or form to medical, dental, or podiatric board certification. That will pretty much guarantee that we get absolutely no more respect or deference from our medical colleagues. If anything, it will draw more of their ire. I can here the chorus of MDs now..."Oh look....how cute....they think they're board certified. Kitchy Kitchy koo."

3) Board certification will almost certainly not garner us any more respect or deference from the general public. BC or not, we will still be widely regarded as the eyeglass guys who work in the mall.

4) In THEORY, board certification SHOULD allow for more licensure portability but even those in power who are proponents of BC have pretty much all but admitted that that won't happen.

5) There is already a mechanism in place to show competency beyond initial licensure and that is fellowship in the AAO. The AAO has different sections that practitioners can obtain expertise in and the culmination of that process is a difficult examination. Why are we trying to reinvent the wheel here?

6) A study by the Kaiser foundation found NO DIFFERENCE in practice patterns, or malpractice rates between those doctors who are board certified and those who aren't.

So again.....someone tell me the upside please??
 
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Oculomotor

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KHE,


I have talked several times with folks at the AOA about this and it (Board Certification) is very likely going to happen....So we have to discuss ways of making it the best we can.

Actually plenty of OD's in Florida have Florida Board Certification next to their names and the ones I have talked to said it is a positive thing for them.....
 

Oculomotor

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I actually have every intention of doing FAAO in the future.....
 

KHE

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KHE,


I have talked several times with folks at the AOA about this and it (Board Certification) is very likely going to happen....So we have to discuss ways of making it the best we can.

Actually plenty of OD's in Florida have Florida Board Certification next to their names and the ones I have talked to said it is a positive thing for them.....

Great...

So even though a recent poll of practicing optometrists showed ODs to be opposed to board certifcation at a rate of about 5:1, the AOA still intends to ram it down our throats.

And I still have yet to have anyone respond to my list of reasons why we should not have it. What is the upside? Can anyone tell me the upside?
 
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cpw

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Great...

So even though a recent poll of practicing optometrists showed ODs to be opposed to board certifcation at a rate of about 5:1, the AOA still intends to ram it down our throats.

And I still have yet to have anyone respond to my list of reasons why we should not have it. What is the upside? Can anyone tell me the upside?

I had to run through the board certification process in Florida and it was just an added expense/nightmare. $2,000 to prove I'm no more competent than I was in Texas.


I'm with Ken. It'll garner no more respect, access to medical panels, etc. It's just more $$ to make the same money I'm making now.... which means I'll be making less because I'll have to pay even more fees! And yes, in Florida my legal title says board certified optometric physician. :rolleyes: I'm still an optometrist.
 

drbizzaro

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I had to run through the board certification process in Florida and it was just an added expense/nightmare. $2,000 to prove I'm no more competent than I was in Texas.


I'm with Ken. It'll garner no more respect, access to medical panels, etc. It's just more $$ to make the same money I'm making now.... which means I'll be making less because I'll have to pay even more fees! And yes, in Florida my legal title says board certified optometric physician. :rolleyes: I'm still an optometrist.

cpw, when it becomes implemented, do you think you will undergo this certification process? since it's voluntary, i think i probably will not do it
 

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Finally, Optometry can join the likes of every other doctorate level precribing profession (medicine, podiatry, dentistry) with a voluntary board certification if it is ratified in June. It is based of the American Board of Family Medicine.....and the response of the President of the American Board of Family Medicine was:

"Given your limited number of accredited
training programs, I think that the options
that you have created for acceptable
pathways to certification are very
reasonable. Congratulations on the
development of an excellent document.”


James C. Puffer, M.D.
President and Chief Executive Officer
American Board of Family Medicine

here is the link:

http://www.aoa.org/documents/JBCPT-Board-Certification-FRAMEWORK-January-27-2009.pdf
 

KHE

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Finally, Optometry can join the likes of every other doctorate level precribing profession (medicine, podiatry, dentistry) with a voluntary board certification if it is ratified in June. It is based of the American Board of Family Medicine.....and the response of the President of the American Board of Family Medicine was:

"Given your limited number of accredited
training programs, I think that the options
that you have created for acceptable
pathways to certification are very
reasonable. Congratulations on the
development of an excellent document.”


James C. Puffer, M.D.
President and Chief Executive Officer
American Board of Family Medicine

here is the link:

http://www.aoa.org/documents/JBCPT-Board-Certification-FRAMEWORK-January-27-2009.pdf

:barf:
:barf:
:barf:
 

gochi

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Finally, Optometry can join the likes of every other doctorate level precribing profession (medicine, podiatry, dentistry) with a voluntary board certification if it is ratified in June. It is based of the American Board of Family Medicine.....and the response of the President of the American Board of Family Medicine was:

"Given your limited number of accredited
training programs, I think that the options
that you have created for acceptable
pathways to certification are very
reasonable. Congratulations on the
development of an excellent document.”


James C. Puffer, M.D.
President and Chief Executive Officer
American Board of Family Medicine

here is the link:

http://www.aoa.org/documents/JBCPT-Board-Certification-FRAMEWORK-January-27-2009.pdf

Hey Oculo :D.....you persistant @#$#4 ! :p
 

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I really hope that the AOA delegates ratify the Voluntary Board Certification plan (sources I have spoke to in the AOA say it is likely) and Optometry can stop being the "oh we have the FAAO instead" profession---excuses and nonsense. The FAAO is an awesome credential (one that I want too) but it is not a substitute. The only thing that the public recognizes and other health care professionals recognize is Board Certification. Medicare and Medicaid will cut costs by requiring it in the future for reimbursement. This is a "voluntary" thing-----you don't have to do it but honestly, there is a 99% chance that I will do a residency and I WANT to have the option of Board Certification for MYSELF. The model the JBCPT has drawn up closely resembles the American Board of Family Medicine and allows for an OD who completed a residency within 3 yrs to immediately sit for the Board Certification Exam or if you have no residency verifiable 3 yrs of clinical practice is required. Either case you don't HAVE to do it but OD's who want the highest attainable level of recognition beyond entry level practice SHOULD have the option. Nobody outside of optometry understands or cares about FAAO but they do care about the term "BOARD CERTIFIED". I get asked ALL THE TIME by my friends in medicine and podiatry why we don't have this when I talk to them about it. Let's move forward please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

KHE

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I really hope that the AOA delegates ratify the Voluntary Board Certification plan (sources I have spoke to in the AOA say it is likely) and Optometry can stop being the "oh we have the FAAO instead" profession---excuses and nonsense. The FAAO is an awesome credential (one that I want too) but it is not a substitute. The only thing that the public recognizes and other health care professionals recognize is Board Certification. Medicare and Medicaid will cut costs by requiring it in the future for reimbursement. This is a "voluntary" thing-----you don't have to do it but honestly, there is a 99% chance that I will do a residency and I WANT to have the option of Board Certification for MYSELF. The model the JBCPT has drawn up closely resembles the American Board of Family Medicine and allows for an OD who completed a residency within 3 yrs to immediately sit for the Board Certification Exam or if you have no residency verifiable 3 yrs of clinical practice is required. Either case you don't HAVE to do it but OD's who want the highest attainable level of recognition beyond entry level practice SHOULD have the option. Nobody outside of optometry understands or cares about FAAO but they do care about the term "BOARD CERTIFIED". I get asked ALL THE TIME by my friends in medicine and podiatry why we don't have this when I talk to them about it. Let's move forward please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

:barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf:

Please....let's be serious now.

I have been in practice nearly 10 years. Not once, not even so much as a single time has any patient, family member, friend, physician, dentist, podiatrist, chiropractor, pharmacist, physical therapist, physicians assistant, nurse, waitress, cab driver, or person sitting next to me on an airplane who found out I was an OD asked me about board certification or if I was board certified. The reason YOUR friends are asking is because YOU bring it up.

For the 100th time, I'll point out again....

The AOA is going to pass it because they have already decided to despite the overwhelming opposition to it amongst their rank and file membership. The AOA and the JCBPTCSOD or whatever the hell it's called has already made up their minds.

No one who is PRO BC has been able to answer any of these questions for me AT ALL.

1) Board Certification will almost certainly NOT get us any more access to medical plans and will almost certainly NOT get us any more reimbursement from the plans we DO have access to. The net result is yet another expensive, time consuming hoop for ODs to jump through that will result in us making the same money, with the same limited access. At BEST, it will do nothing. At WORST, it will be just another thing for VSP or Eyemed to require ODs to do so that they can continue to reimburse us $40 an exam. I have never ever ONCE in my almost 10 years in this business been denied access to any medical plan, hospital, nursing home, etc. etc. because I wasn't board certified or board eligible. Don't think for a second that this won't happen. You claim it's voluntary and it might be just that for the first couple of years but it's only a matter of (short) time before VSP and Eyemed and the major optometric players require board certification to be on their piss poor paying panels. This will make it defacto NOT voluntary. It will also basically mean that we will ALL have to end up "board certified" which basically means that NONE of us will be board certified because we will ALL have that extra silly little plaque (that we paid thousands of dollars for) to hang on the wall.

2) Optometric board certification as it is being discussed will not be comparable in any way, shape or form to medical, dental, or podiatric board certification. That will pretty much guarantee that we get absolutely no more respect or deference from our medical colleagues. If anything, it will draw more of their ire. I can here the chorus of MDs now..."Oh look....how cute....they think they're board certified. Kitchy Kitchy koo."

3) Board certification will almost certainly not garner us any more respect or deference from the general public. BC or not, we will still be widely regarded as the eyeglass guys who work in the mall.

4) In THEORY, board certification SHOULD allow for more licensure portability but even those in power who are proponents of BC have pretty much all but admitted that that won't happen.

5) There is already a mechanism in place to show competency beyond initial licensure and that is fellowship in the AAO. The AAO has different sections that practitioners can obtain expertise in and the culmination of that process is a difficult examination. Why are we trying to reinvent the wheel here? You say that the FAAO is NOT a substitute. WHY NOT? It involves the accumulation of points through residency, case studies, published papers, etc. etc. followed by an examination. How is that different from the proposed BC?

6) A study by the Kaiser foundation found NO DIFFERENCE in practice patterns, or malpractice rates between those doctors who are board certified and those who aren't. Where is the continuing competency or the advanced competency??
 

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Board certification was discussed last night at our local society meeting. The general consensus was that, though no one is anywhere near excited about it, it will very likely become more of an issue in the future. The question is whether or not ODs should take the gamble by not participating in it.

From what I understand, board certification would be voluntary. As has been mentioned already, Medicare and others will very likely require it for reimbursement. Which means a lot of us will have no choice but to play their game.

We were also told that various websites that patients can go to when looking for a provider will have things in the search like, "Would you prefer a doctor who is board certified? Check yes or no." So even though I'm sure NO patients really think about it right now, if they do see something like this, I'm sure they will pick yes...it just sounds better even if it is effectively meaningless.

I also hear it would be an every 10 years kind of thing? That is similar to the cycle for other board certifications? I have no problems admitting that I don't know a lot about this, but it's starting to come up more and more at meetings and whatnot, so I'm just starting to learn more about it. Right now I have an "Oh well, let's watch and see" sort of outlook, but I will play their game if I have to.
 
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KHE

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Board certification was discussed last night at our local society meeting. The general consensus was that, though no one is anywhere near excited about it, it will very likely become more of an issue in the future. The question is whether or not ODs should take the gamble by not participating in it.

From what I understand, board certification would be voluntary. As has been mentioned already, Medicare and others will very likely require it for reimbursement. Which means a lot of us will have no choice but to play their game.

We were also told that various websites that patients can go to when looking for a provider will have things in the search like, "Would you prefer a doctor who is board certified? Check yes or no." So even though I'm sure NO patients really think about it right now, if they do see something like this, I'm sure they will pick yes...it just sounds better even if it is effectively meaningless.

I also hear it would be an every 10 years kind of thing? That is similar to the cycle for other board certifications? I have no problems admitting that I don't know a lot about this, but it's starting to come up more and more at meetings and whatnot, so I'm just starting to learn more about it. Right now I have an "Oh well, let's watch and see" sort of outlook, but I will play their game if I have to.

Again....

Medical boards have "board certification" because every branch of medicine, even "family medicine" is a specialty.

In optometry, we don't have that. We're all optometrists and we're going to end up being board certified in optometry. That's ridiculous.

If you want to allow for some sort of designation of advanced competency within a certain area of optometry, such as contact lenses, low vision etc. etc. that's fine. But we ALREADY HAVE A MECHANISM IN PLACE FOR THAT!

What percentage of podiatrists or dentists are board certified? Anyone know? Anyone want to hazard a guess? Well...I looked into it and it's a REAL TINY AMOUNT.

Now....are you telling me that all those "non certified" podiatrists and dentists are falling all over themselves wetting their pants because maybe, possibly, there's a microscopic chance that in the future medicaid might require that all it's providers are board certified? I doubt it.

This problem can be resolved by simply changing the American Academy of Optometry to the American BOARD of Optometry. Then, you can easily "board certify" whoever wants to be in whatever sub specialty they want to be.

But this notion of board certifying optometrists in optometry is beyond ridiculous.
 

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KHE,

I understand the point you are making regarding being board certified in a specialty area such as ocular disease, low vision, glaucoma, CL's, etc...would make much more sense then just "general optometry." But optometry is just going to have to "play the game" to compete in a world where those letters BOARD CERTIFIED will = reimbursement, access to insurance panels, etc.....or not.

We have to play along or we will get left out.
 

KHE

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KHE,

I understand the point you are making regarding being board certified in a specialty area such as ocular disease, low vision, glaucoma, CL's, etc...would make much more sense then just "general optometry." But optometry is just going to have to "play the game" to compete in a world where those letters BOARD CERTIFIED will = reimbursement, access to insurance panels, etc.....or not.

We have to play along or we will get left out.

WE DON'T HAVE ACCESS TO INSURANCE PANELS IN MANY PARTS OF THE COUNTRY NOW!!!!! DO YOU HONESTLY THINK THAT COMING UP WITH SOME GOOFBALL VERSION OF BOARD CERTIFICATION IS GOING TO SUDDENLY MAKE THESE PLAYERS SAY "WELCOME ABOARD OPTOMETRISTS??" IT'S NOT GOING TO HAPPEN!!!

And again, JUST CHANGE THE NAME OF THE ACADEMY TO "THE BOARD" AND WE'RE 90% OF THE WAY THERE!! THERE'S NO REASON TO REINVENT THE WHEEL WITH ANOTHER COSTLY, TIME CONSUMING PROGRAM WHICH WILL NOT PRODUCE BETTER CLINICAL OUTCOMES FOR OUR PATIENTS!!!!
 

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KHE, I don't think anyone disagrees with you in principle.... We're just preparing ourselves for the possibility (even if it's a small possibility) that we'll have to play the game, even if it is completely illogical.
 

KHE

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KHE, I don't think anyone disagrees with you in principle.... We're just preparing ourselves for the possibility (even if it's a small possibility) that we'll have to play the game, even if it is completely illogical.

Ok fine...I understand that. But they are going about it the wrong way. There is already a great mechanism in place to account for this. There is no reason to create another mindless, time consuming, expensive hoop to jump through.
 

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The six organizations that put this Optometry Board Certification together (in consultation with American Academy of Family Medicine) did it right this time, It is based of the "medical model" of board certification in family medicine. Whether "converting" the AAO or making a new ABO (American Board of Optometry), this is needed whether it means something at the clinical level or not. Optometry cannot stand alone as the only doctorate level prescribing profession without at least a board certification "in name". So KHE, does the medical community scoff at the Podiatry or Dental board certification processes? You know in their minds those two professions are limited license providers (ergo outside of the MD country club). So KHE I would not worry about what some MD's think about that---> at an organizational level they think that Dentistry, Optometry, and Podiatry are inferior limited license providers so who cares what the F they think at an organizational level. Most of my friends and family who are MD's I have talked to about this (Optometry getting a board certification) think it is a great idea and ridiculous that we never had it. Again, like I said, we need to "play the game" even just in name and move forward. Maybe I am just a naive student but I care about this profession.


Bottom Line: Most likely the AOA House of Delegates are going to ratify this in June so it will become reality.
 

KHE

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The six organizations that put this Optometry Board Certification together (in consultation with American Academy of Family Medicine) did it right this time, It is based of the "medical model" of board certification in family medicine. Whether "converting" the AAO or making a new ABO (American Board of Optometry), this is needed whether it means something at the clinical level or not. Optometry cannot stand alone as the only doctorate level prescribing profession without at least a board certification "in name". So KHE, does the medical community scoff at the Podiatry or Dental board certification processes? You know in their minds those two professions are limited license providers (ergo outside of the MD country club). So KHE I would not worry about what some MD's think about that---> at an organizational level they think that Dentistry, Optometry, and Podiatry are inferior limited license providers so who cares what the F they think at an organizational level. Most of my friends and family who are MD's I have talked to about this (Optometry getting a board certification) think it is a great idea and ridiculous that we never had it. Again, like I said, we need to "play the game" even just in name and move forward. Maybe I am just a naive student but I care about this profession.


Bottom Line: Most likely the AOA House of Delegates are going to ratify this in June so it will become reality.

So basically what you're saying is that they're going to cram it up our collective asses without even having the courtesy to give us a reach around.

Now....I'm sorry to be profane about it, but that's pretty much the way it is. I have been an AOA member and Academy member my entire professional career. Not once did I receive a notification from either organization that this was being considered, nor was my opinion ever solicited. Lo and behold, talking to a half dozen other ODs who are all members of the AOA and a few academy members and they weren't asked either.

Rest assured, I don't care what MDs think. I leave that up to you. But if as you say, all we need is for this to occur in name because even you yourself now seem to be admitting that it will have no clinical impact on patient outcomes, then explain to me again why we're trying to reinvent the wheel here? Just have people take the PAM every 10 years. There's already an organization in place (called the national BOARD) to handle this and then we can all tell our wittle senators that we're all "board" certified.
 

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Yes KHE basically that is what I am saying......Optometry needs to play the game and have this. It is "voluntary" so you don't "have" to do it......:) But in reality many of the VSP's of the world will start requiring it for reimbursement down the road to save money.....the dominoes will start falling.......Optometry has to be prepared and stop being the "red haired and freckled stepchild" of the independent prescribing doctorate professions.
 

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Yes KHE basically that is what I am saying......Optometry needs to play the game and have this. It is "voluntary" so you don't "have" to do it......:) But in reality many of the VSP's of the world will start requiring it for reimbursement down the road to save money.....the dominoes will start falling.......Optometry has to be prepared and stop being the "red haired and freckled stepchild" of the independent prescribing doctorate professions.

VSP isn't going to require it if we don't have it.

Optometry is the red haired stepchild for plenty of reasons but our lack of board certification is NOT it. And the notion that we'll suddenly be welcomed into the family if we implement board certification is a non-starter.

You keep referencing that we are the only "independent prescribing doctorate profession" without board certification.

What percentage of podiatrists, dentists and chiropractors have completed board certification through their respective organizations?
 

Oculomotor

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Apr 23, 2007
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KHE,

Look you make very good points......A great number of Independent Doctorate Level Prescribers (IDLP's)--Podiatrists and Dentists do not have board certification (Chiropractors don't count because they do not prescribe medicines). BUT it is AVAILABLE and in a world where perception is reality (even if clinically it has limited validity) it needs to be available. If it is there I will definitely do it.....I am 100% going to do a residency and then I will be board eligible (according to the proposed ABO guidelines) and I will get the board certification. Patients are now surfing the internet on these "grading" sites for potential practitioners they are shopping for and "Board Certification" is an important item for them. I agree with you KHE it is kind of silly in a way BUT we need to play the game just like Medicine, Dentistry, and Podiatry. We are NOT immune to this and will be taken to task for it if we don't have something in place.
 

eyestrain

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Sep 29, 2005
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Patients are now surfing the internet on these "grading" sites for potential practitioners they are shopping for and "Board Certification" is an important item for them.

Board certification is important to them? Bullsh!t. Like KHE, I've never had a single patient, friend or family member EVER ask anything about BC.


I agree with you KHE it is kind of silly in a way BUT we need to play the game just like Medicine, Dentistry, and Podiatry. We are NOT immune to this and will be taken to task for it if we don't have something in place.

That's a terrible reason for BC. Just because medicine, dentistry and podiatry do it? So the hell what? And who's going to take us to task if we don't have any? This makes no sense.
 

drbizzaro

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Jul 13, 2004
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KHE,
Patients are now surfing the internet on these "grading" sites for potential practitioners they are shopping for and "Board Certification" is an important item for them.

No one gives a SH!T about "board certification". What they care about is how much the eye exams cost. The lower the better. Patients want to get the cheapest eye exams possible, at Americas Best or Visionworks, and could care less if the doctor is Board Certified.
 

eyestrain

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No one gives a SH!T about "board certification". What they care about is how much the eye exams cost. The lower the better. Patients want to get the cheapest eye exams possible, at Americas Best or Visionworks, and could care less if the doctor is Board Certified.

Exactly. If people actually gave a rat's ass about quality eye care, there wouldn't be an America's Best or Visionworks (and yes, I know there are good docs working commercial and bad ones in PP.)
 

KHE

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Jun 14, 2005
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KHE,

Look you make very good points......A great number of Independent Doctorate Level Prescribers (IDLP's)--Podiatrists and Dentists do not have board certification (Chiropractors don't count because they do not prescribe medicines). BUT it is AVAILABLE and in a world where perception is reality (even if clinically it has limited validity) it needs to be available.

Regardless of whether we are board certified or not, we are still going to be perceived as the "glasses guys at the malls and Walmart."

If it is there I will definitely do it.....I am 100% going to do a residency and then I will be board eligible (according to the proposed ABO guidelines) and I will get the board certification. Patients are now surfing the internet on these "grading" sites for potential practitioners they are shopping for and "Board Certification" is an important item for them. I agree with you KHE it is kind of silly in a way BUT we need to play the game just like Medicine, Dentistry, and Podiatry. We are NOT immune to this and will be taken to task for it if we don't have something in place.

The participation rate of board certification in dentistry and podiatry is vanishingly small. Is there a tidal of wave of dentists and podiatrists falling all over themselves, pissing their pants trying to quickly get board certified lest they be "taken to task?"

If there is....then I will throw myfull support behind optometric board certification, dubious as it may be.

If there's not....well then.....yet another in a long list of bad ideas that organized optometry has come up with.
 

tmoney

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Nov 26, 2008
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KTE, you're right, there are a TON of older podiatrists that either do no surgery, or do minor-ish procedures in surgicenters...thus having no real need for board cert (american board of podiatric surgery).

however, if a podiatrist wants to do any sort of surgery in a hospital, they almost always need to be board certified, as per hospital protocal. that said,the vast majority of pod grads in the last 15yrs are board certified, as we are trained in forefoot, rearfoot, and ankle reconstruction during our mandatory residency... procedures that are predominately done in hospitals.

as more older pods retire, we will be left with only board certified podiatric surgeons (minus those who will throw away their residency training to only cut toenails and shave callouses!...and make the big $$)
 
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