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Is it too early?

Discussion in 'ERAS, SOAP, and NRMP Match' started by Cholinergic, Dec 3, 2008.

  1. Cholinergic

    Cholinergic Member
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    Is it too early to express a strong interest in a program? I mean, not say "you're my #1" or anything. But just letting them know you got a great feeling from the program. Also, is it too soon to say that you want to do a second look? Thanks!
     
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  3. yumita

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    Yeah, good question. I interviewed at a place on Monday and really liked it alot. I clicked nicely with everyone that interviewed me and all the residents I met. So I sent emails thanking the PD, the PC and the 2 faculty members who interiewed me, letting them know how much I liked the program and that I would be getting back in touch with them soon. I also sent a more informal hand-written thank you card to the resident who was our all day tour guide and host.

    Is this stalker-like? Was it a good move?

    Anyone know?

    Thanks
     
  4. mcl

    mcl
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    Unless the PD or PC has expressly told you otherwise, it is fine to express your interest in a program--PDs, residents and PCs like to hear that applicants enjoyed their visit and are seriously considering their program. I think you are fine with the email (or card) for now, and a follow up after you've completed your interviews. In the second contact, let the PD know what you like about the program and why you think you'll be a good fit there. Often these types of contacts don't affect your ultimate placement on a program's rank list, but there are certainly exceptions to that generalization. (We once had an applicant go from "A" group to top 10 to ranked-to-match due largely to her post-interview correspondence).

    Express your interest, turn in your rank list, trust in the basic fairness of the Match process, breathe, and wait until March.
     
  5. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member
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    In my opinion, your statement has the most impact sometime in mid-late January, when programs can start to assume you are close to done interviewing. Before that, you run the risk of programs assuming you are telling them you like their program before seeing a bunch of others, or that you say that to everyone. It has more impact if you've already seen what's out there. Plus, if you tell them now, you have to think up another reason to email them later -- it's too long until February to communicate and sit tight.
     
  6. Cholinergic

    Cholinergic Member
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    Very helpful replies. Thanks!
     
  7. peerie

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    What does this mean exactly? I mean, if I have only my top ten to rank, what does this mean that the programs are doing? Is there a 'one to one' coordination (one, two three for applicants they like and want to rank) or is it more like groups of 'one' 'two' 'three' or whatever. And, what does it mean 'ranked to match' versus 'top 10' versus 'A Group'?

    Really, I am not sure how programs put down their top people choices and I admit I am feeling kind of freaked out about all this. I have no idea where programs might rank me. Say I rank a program #1 and they kind of like me but at what point will I not get that program? Or, say I rank a program #3, where do I have to fall in their 'love list' in order to actually match at their program?

    I am getting nervous about all this stuff !! :scared: Mostly, because I really don't understand it.
     
  8. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member
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    Programs may have only a dozen spots to fill, but may have interviewed hundreds of people. So they can rank hundreds if they choose, which allows them to avoid the scramble. They know historically how deep into the rank list they tend to go before they fill, so they have a decent notion of what slots are "ranked to match". Meaning for a dozen spots, it may be anticipated that someone they ranked 20 is ranked to match, because the program usually doesn't get their first dozen choices. Obviously being in the top 10 in my example is surer because you aren't depending on the prior folks going elsewhere for you to get your slot. (The prior poster may have used those terms differently, as there may have been fewer than 10 slots, but you get the idea). As for A group - that must be specific to the prior poster's program -- I don't think other places use that term.

    None of this matters you you -- you always want to rank the places you want the most the highest, because the algorithm used tries to give the students their top choices that also want them. Meaning don't play games thinking if you list a less competitive place higher it gives you a better chance to match someplace. You just list your 10 in the order you want to attend, and it will work out the way it should.
     
  9. mcl

    mcl
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    In my program "Ranked to Match" is a 1:1 correlation with the number of Intern slots we have. Since we have fewer than 10 Intern positions, "top 10" is the next demarkation. Historically we are likely to fill within our top 10-15 applicants. We have four primary groups: A, B, C, and D. The "A" group is made up of the applicants that faculty and residents agreed they liked the best and have strongest academics. The "B" group are people who we feel would be fine in our residency. The "C" group are people who we will rank but either residency, faculty, or coordinator sensed something which may indicate a problem. The "D" group are applicants we don't intend to rank--there are usually no more than 2-3 people in this group.

    So the applicant in my earlier post was someone everyone liked as she was placed in the "A" group after interviews. But the "A" group could have 25+ people in it, so on the strength of her follow up correspondence, the PD moved her to the "top 10" where she was most likely to match. Ultimately she was moved again to a position where she was guaranteed to match if she listed us first on her rank list (which she did).

    Regarding the A/B/C/D groups--don't worry too much about any of that. It's really just inside baseball, and I can tell you that one of our absolute STAR residents matched from well within our "B" group. Yes, initially the faculty were disappointed at how far down our rank list we went to fill, but it didn't take anyone long to see that she was a superior resident because of her willingness to learn and work well with others.

    If you rank the places you like in the order you liked them without worrying about where a program has you ranked, everyone will win in the long run. On Match Day you won't know if you were your program's #1 choice or the last person on their rank list--and it won't matter. Good programs treat all of their residents like they were their #1 choice (and vice versa--I don't want to find out that I was the 4th program on one of my resident's rank list. But even if I was, I want them to act like and work like we were their #1 choice).
     

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