lejijohn

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halo friends , my name is dr leji john and i am from india , from where i have completed my undergraduate studies in medicine, i M.BB.S. although pharmacology was a subject in my curriculum , i am not a full time pharmacy student , back here in india we have something called M.D in pharmacology which consists of three years of residency just like in M.D in INTERNAL MEDICINE?i would like to know does UNITED STATES hae anything called as M.D PHARMACOLOGY , and if so is USMLE required for it like the other clinical courses or is gre required for it and if so whats the degree u get an ms/phd? or an md . i would like to join a pharmaceutical firm back in india after this and so guys if u could help me out as to which course would be most beneficial in order to get a better pay package?pls reply guys
leji
 

Pureride

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theres no such thing in the states.
Your MD is completely unrelated to which medical field you chose down the line. In other words the MD affords you the opportunity to be considered for a residency training program which then if the residency is accredited, and you have successfully completed your residency and passed all 3 steps of the USMLE can be eligible to sit for the appropriate board certification.

There is no pharmacology residency.
The closet thing is anesthesia and its a far cry from pharmacology.
An MD is trained to diagnose and treat disease a pharmacologist simply gets a piece of paper from an MD, DO or NP and follows the instructions for filling up the bottle of pills or on areally exciting day maybe a couple of tubes of ointment.

If you have an MD and your plan is to go into pharmacology for a drug company what further training are you looking for?

I hope I was helpful and best of luck.
-Pure
 

BKN

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lejijohn said:
halo friends , my name is dr leji john and i am from india , from where i have completed my undergraduate studies in medicine, i M.BB.S. although pharmacology was a subject in my curriculum , i am not a full time pharmacy student , back here in india we have something called M.D in pharmacology which consists of three years of residency just like in M.D in INTERNAL MEDICINE?i would like to know does UNITED STATES hae anything called as M.D PHARMACOLOGY , and if so is USMLE required for it like the other clinical courses or is gre required for it and if so whats the degree u get an ms/phd? or an md . i would like to join a pharmaceutical firm back in india after this and so guys if u could help me out as to which course would be most beneficial in order to get a better pay package?pls reply guys
leji
Complicated question: First realize that MBBS=MD more or less. So there is no such thing as a MD in Internal Medicine or Pharmacology etc. However, MDs must take postgraduate training (in most states not less than 2 years) in order to treat patients independently.

Pharmacists are professionals who dispense medications ordered by physicians. There is a bachelor's and a Doctor of Pharmacy degree available. The latter are often the Executives running large hospital pharmacies or they may be doing research for pharmacuetical houses..

The pharmacologists are the basic scientists doing research in a medical school or a pharmaceutical house. There are master's and doctors of philosophy degrees available.

Depending on what you wanted to do in a pharmaceutical company in the US you might want a residency (so you could do clinical research on human subjects and patients), a pharmacology doctorate (to do bench research) or a doctor of pharmacy (less of a research degree).

Hope this helps.
 
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beriberi

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There are some residencies in pharmacology in the united states (critical care, pediatrics, etc.) but these are for people who are interested in working at large academic centers. I get the sense they are fairly competitive.

I think puride is confused; just because anesthesiologists administer their own drugs (a task that is usually only done in american hospitals by nurses) they are no closer to pharmacologists than any other medical speciality (no extra pharm training, no license to distribute drugs, etc).

In the u.s. the typical course for a pharmacist is 4 years college followed by 3-4 years pharm school (and then, very rarely, a residency).
 

pazzer2

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I'm a US MD and work in the pharma industry. There is a specialization similar to what is available in India.

Here in the US, there is an approved board for what is known as "Clinical Pharmacology". Details are here.

Among the many requirements for board certification, is that the person must complete a 2 year fellowship in Clinical Pharmacology. A list of accredited programs in the US are here.
 

pazzer2

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I just wanted to clear up a few things. The reason why the original poster asked about post-graduate degrees, is that in India, the basic medical degree is the MBBS (Bachelors in Medicine, Bachelors in Surgery). This is called an undergraduate degree and equivalent to 6 years of training after high school.

After MBBS, some students go onto residencies for additional training. So for internal medicine, one can go for training for an additional 3 years and obtain an MD degree. If you wanted to become a cardiologist, you would then have to complete a cardiology fellowship (and then obtain the DM degree). The type of degree awarded varies from specialty to specialty (some specialties don't award degrees at all).

So to summarize, in India, one does get additional degrees after medical school.
 

cchoukal

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Pureride said:
a pharmacologist simply gets a piece of paper from an MD, DO or NP and follows the instructions for filling up the bottle of pills or on areally exciting day maybe a couple of tubes of ointment.
This is true except in a few cases where, based on "moral grounds," pharmacists can refuse to dispense medicines presecribed by physicians/NPs/PAs, and frequently, they are supported by their employers and professional organizations for doing so. So far, this "opting out" has been limited to medicines related to reproductive choice (emergency contraception and, yes, even regular old oral contraception pills). I realize this is a little off topic, but I thought it was worth mentioning that, for better or worse, pharmacists (even those registered pharmacists with minimal training beyond a bachelor's degree) are exerting medical decision-making power under the banner of "professionalism."
 
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hi all. i am a MD Clinical Pharmacology resident enrolled in one of the Medical School in Nepal. Here, Pharmacist and Pharmacologist are far different from each other. We get to enrolled in MD Clinical Pharmacology only after completion of MBBS (Bachelor's degree after which we are allowed to practice medicine all over the country, independently). After completion, back here in Nepal, we usually become Assistant Professor and can continue as Academician. Well, I don't want to end up that way. I heard that we can go for DM Clinical Pharmacology. Well I was interested to know other possibilities after my MD Clinical Pharmacology.
 
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