phorun

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I'm going to school full time (25h/week of lecture/lab plus more time to do assignments and study).

I just got books for the MCAT and I'm wondering how soon is reasonable to write and get a decent score, if I realistically assume I can study 3-5h/week.

Naturally I'd like to score in the 30's (well actually a 45 would suit me just fine thanks).

In the summer I will be working full time also, and taking the summer off probably isn't an option.

Thanks
 

scaredoflife

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Well question A: when are you going to take the MCAT?
 

phorun

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I'd like to write the MCAT as soon as I can, but without sacrificing points.:rolleyes: I probably should really have titled this thread, "when can I write?"
 
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scaredoflife

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Well seeing as how you can only devote 3-5 hrs a week during school time, then you will have to put in a lot of study time during summer. If you are planing on applying the 2009-2010 application cycle, I would say it would tough seeing as how you have very limited time of studying. But you can make it possible by studying as much as possible this upcoming spring and summer and take it maybe Late June, early July my answer. It all depends on where you are MCAT wise, maybe you should take a diagnostic test to see where you stand and what you would need to do.
 

phorun

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That makes sense scaredoflife. I'm not planning on applying for at least another year... but a diagnostic makes sense. Thanks.
 

rocuronium

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Don't write the MCAT until you are doing well consistently on the practice exams.
 

SN2ed

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And do well (30+)? Probably not. If you don't have the time, I suggest you don't take the test. You should be looking at 3-5 hours per day, not week. You do not want to retake because you went in unprepared. That said, I don't know you (gez that sounds Jerry Springerish), you might be able to pull it off; however, most people could not.
 

scaredoflife

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Well Sn2ed since the Phorun said that he/she will not be taking it until for another year. They might just need a year of studying and taking the test. But yeah I agree with your post Sn2ed.
 

SN2ed

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Even if he/she studies for a year, at 3-5 hours per week, it's not good enough. The review will be far too spread out. Just think, if the OP took only 4 FLs, it would take 2 months or more. One full length takes 5 hours and 20 minutes with breaks (which one should take, but that's another thread). Then, add to that a post-FL analysis which should take at least another ~6 hours since it should take ~2-3x longer (3 hours and 20 minutes for BS-PS-VR). Another way to put it, they'll be reviewing roughly 1-2 chapters per week, most likely 1. Now think about how many chapters there are for the typical MCAT review book. On top of that, one has to take and review tons of practice problems. Whether the OP has a realistic shot of a 30+ or not comes down to if the OP can buckle down during the summer.

Too many people rush to take the MCAT and are then surprised when they do poorly.
 

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You should be fine. In all honesty, studying for the MCAT really isn't necessary. I studied maybe 3 or 4 hours total for it the week of the test, didn't even know there were going to be passages in the science sections, and never took a practice test. I did fine. Just make sure you can recall what you learned in your science courses, and have good analytical thought for VR.
 

rocuronium

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You should be fine. In all honesty, studying for the MCAT really isn't necessary. I studied maybe 3 or 4 hours total for it the week of the test, didn't even know there were going to be passages in the science sections, and never took a practice test. I did fine. Just make sure you can recall what you learned in your science courses, and have good analytical thought for VR.
While this might have been successful for you, I doubt that it would be for a large majority of people planning to write this test.

That is unless you were being sarcastic. In which case... wow.
 

DrSno

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While this might have been successful for you, I doubt that it would be for a large majority of people planning to write this test.

That is unless you were being sarcastic. In which case... wow.
Well, that's still my advice.

I'm not sure how my posting could be taken as sarcasm. The test is seriously just the stuff you learn in the general science courses (bio, organic chem, gen chem, physics). And from what I've heard, it's tough to raise your VR score through studying.
 

phorun

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Sooo, is it fair to say that is REALLY depends on the person as to how much studying it will take???;)

Thanks for all the different opinions. SN2ed that mathematical breakdown makes a lot of sense, actually. I can see that 3-5h is pretty much waaay to little... sadly.

Guess I'll stick with gleek's words of wisdom and study and wait until I'm doing well on the practice exams. :xf: Very sensible.

Thanks so much guys!
 

phorun

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You should be fine. In all honesty, studying for the MCAT really isn't necessary. I studied maybe 3 or 4 hours total for it the week of the test, didn't even know there were going to be passages in the science sections, and never took a practice test. I did fine. Just make sure you can recall what you learned in your science courses, and have good analytical thought for VR.
Can I have your brain?:D;):smuggrin:
 

SN2ed

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I'd only take 2-3 practice tests after you're done with your content review to see where you stand. In your case, if your study method hasn't produced results in that time, you'll have to change your technique. You don't want to go through all of your practice tests and then discover your strategy wasn't working.
 

rocuronium

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Well, that's still my advice.

I'm not sure how my posting could be taken as sarcasm. The test is seriously just the stuff you learn in the general science courses (bio, organic chem, gen chem, physics). And from what I've heard, it's tough to raise your VR score through studying.
I wasn't trying to be rude, it's just surprising to me how someone could do so well with such a small amount of studying. As phorun put it: Can I have your brain? :D

All the best with the studying! Good things come from hard work.
 
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