Apr 23, 2013
19
12
Status
Pre-Medical
Hi-
I've done a lot of searching, but the area of SMP/Postbacc seems pretty hazy so I wanted to get the opinion of people who know what they're talking about.
I am currently attending an out of state school and will be graduating in the spring. My scholarships and such expire and I cannot continue taking classes here. I have a 3.5 cGPA but a 2.7 sGPA because I am a non science major and have only taken about 60 credits of science and math.
If I move back home and attend my state school as a non-degree seeking student and get As in 24 credits of science classes, I should be able to raise my sGPA to 3.08 which would help immensely right? If I continued another semester and raised it to 3.2 I should able to get an interview or two if I apply broadly to MD?
I have fine ECs, lots of shadowing, involvement for 4+ years in campus orgs, shadowing, volunteering, research. I would continue working a full time job, volunteering, and shadowing while taking classes.

I don't want to spend a lot of money for a structured postbacc or SMP, but still want to improve my sGPA as much as possible.

Any advice is appreciated!
 

Remy LeBeau

7+ Year Member
Mar 30, 2011
284
149
SOCMOB
Status
Medical Student
Check out the post bacc forum here and the nontrad forum here. The post bacc forum stickies have a TON of useful information (especially about financing).

IMO, with a 2.7 sGPA, you'll probably need to go the SMP route instead of the non-degree-seeking route, especially since you already have 60 credits in science/math. It only gets harder and harder to move your GPA once you have that many classes done.
 

DrFLAGATORS

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Nov 19, 2008
120
4
Florida
Status
Pre-Medical
2.7 sGPA shows that you cannot consistently score well on science exams. You need an SMP, and you need a high MCAT score in order to get into an MD school.

Aim for a 35+ on the MCAT, go to an SMP, get straight A's, then apply the following year once you have a full year's grade.

That will give you the best shot.
 
OP
O
Apr 23, 2013
19
12
Status
Pre-Medical
2.7 sGPA shows that you cannot consistently score well on science exams. You need an SMP, and you need a high MCAT score in order to get into an MD school.

Aim for a 35+ on the MCAT, go to an SMP, get straight A's, then apply the following year once you have a full year's grade.

That will give you the best shot.

Why is an SMP more important than just post bacc courses? I've already calculated what my sGPA could be and that's 3.2, why would it look better to go to an SMP?
 

Instatewaiter

But... there's a troponin
10+ Year Member
Apr 28, 2006
6,066
2,116
Washington
Status
Attending Physician
Well you have already shown that you can't perform well in science courses. A few A's won't go all that far.

Realistically, you may have to do both. You may have to bring up your science GPA to above 3.0 first followed by an SMP. This will likely take you a few years of grade remediation.
 

DrFLAGATORS

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Nov 19, 2008
120
4
Florida
Status
Pre-Medical
Doing well in an SMP is more important than just doing well in undergraduate science classes because the courseload is harder, and you're competing at a higher level.

You may have to do both, though. it will be difficult for you to get into a well known SMP with a 2.7 sGPA, unless you maybe destroy the MCAT. I did an SMP, and only one person had a 2.9, but his MCAT was a 38. He did well in the SMP, then got into medical school.

I believe you should do both...Get your sGPA to a 3.2 with undergraduate coursework. Then an SMP. Doing well in an SMP shows that you can succeed with a rigorous science courseload, showing admin that your prior stats are no longer an indicator of your current efforts and abilities. You can also set up a meeting with an MD school's admissions committee member, and see what they hav to say.

As for the time thing...Let me tell you my story - I was accepted to an MD medical school in 2012, the one I did the SMP at. Unfortunately, I had some immigration issues and couldn't attend. I just got them solved, so I'm clear to re-apply to medical school; however, my MCAT expired. So, I will have to re-take the MCAT this May (its been 4 years since I've studied this stuff), while i work full-time, then re-apply this June for August 2015 matriculation. I will start medical school (assuming i will get accepted this upcoming cycle) 3 years from my original acceptance.

So it depends on how bad you want it. It is unlikely you will turn success away because it came a couple years later than you expected.