tijames

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3.4 sci gpa (almost all my bad grades were when I was fresh/soph and I tranferred out to a different school, and have done real well). 3.6 overall, biochemistry major.

Limited research experience (signed up with a prof, he had some sort of family issue happen so we only discussed stuff, never did lab time. I did however take a class that was all research based...very writing intensive and all our data was used by the prof in her lab.)

EC:
-Volunteer for Habitat for Humanity- I (>1 yr)
-Shadowing a FP doc once a week- starting next semester
-Volunteering in er ~4-5 hrs a week- starting next semester
-gen chem tutor- 1 semester
-biochemistry tutor/biochemistry TA-2 semesters
-physics tutor- 1 semester
-Researching and writing for a health education company~1 hr a week
-chess club
- I help at Soup kitchen (~5 hours a month)

MCAT- Have not taken it yet, but with diligence and study I think I can do fine. I've heard IU is really about gpa and mcat, not so much the "person" the applicant is. What are my chances? What score do I need to get into IU?

LORS: My adviser asked me if he could write me a letter of rec. I will have tutored two semesters for his biochemistry classes, and been in two of his classes. It should be a very good letter. For my second one, I'm considering having a doc I volunteer with do it or my employer. Thoughts on that?

I am graduating this may. I am planning on applying in june of 2012, so I have 18 months to improve my application. I'll be working in biotech or pharm, still planning on volunteering at an ER/peds at the local hospital.



ANY advice would be GREAT as to how I can better my application, suggestions for my time off, etc. Thanks!:D
 
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Catalystik

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Considering the median acceptee stats for IU are 3.8/32, you'll want to aim for a correspondingly higher MCAT score to compensate for the lower GPA. A 3.7 is their median BCPM, BTW. A strong recent upward science grade trend, including upper-level Bio would be helpful to you.

Though Indiana may not care so much about ECs, you are wise to develop an application that will appeal to a broad range of schools. Your teaching is very good. Your shadowing will be fine. I'm glad you'll continue to gain clinical experience for a total of 1.5 years. The soup kitchen and H for H involvement is terrific. Even just one semester of research would help your application. Have you considered a job with Americorps for a year? You can get a medically-related job. Or Teach for America or Peace Corps, both a 2-year commitment. All of these would give a major boost to your application.

For LORs, one usually is asked for two science LORs from profs who taught you, and one nonscience prof, all of whom can comment on your academic prowess. A PI letter is usually submitted if one does research. Physician LORs are more commonly required with DO schools. An employer or volunteer coordinator letter might occasionally be asked for. Try to get as many as possible before leaving school, using a letter service to keep them for you.
 
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tijames

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Apr 5, 2005
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Considering the median acceptee stats for IU are 3.8/32, you'll want to aim for a correspondingly higher MCAT score to compensate for the lower GPA. A 3.7 is their median BCPM, BTW. A strong recent upward science grade trend, including upper-level Bio would be helpful to you.

Though Indiana may not care so much about ECs, you are wise to develop an application that will appeal to a broad range of schools. Your teaching is very good. Your shadowing will be fine. I'm glad you'll continue to gain clinical experience for a total of 1.5 years. The soup kitchen and H for H involvement is terrific. Even just one semester of research would help your application. Have you considered a job with Americorps for a year? You can get a medically-related job. Or Teach for America or Peace Corps, both a 2-year commitment. All of these would give a major boost to your application.

For LORs, one usually is asked for two science LORs from profs who taught you, and one nonscience prof, all of whom can comment on your academic prowess. A PI letter is usually submitted if one does research. Physician LORs are more commonly required with DO schools. An employer or volunteer coordinator letter might occasionally be asked for. Try to get as many as possible before leaving school, using a letter service to keep them for you.

That's very helpful. I really appreciate your thoughts!:thumbup: