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wright6

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For the past 9 months I have worked at an outpatient clinic, accumulating somewhere between 400 and 500 hours as a PT aide. I love my job but I get paid minimum wage. In the near future, I may have the opportunity of taking a serving position at a high end restaurant, which means lots of tips. Id be taking home at least double at this job if I get it. If I get this job, should I let go of the PT job? How would schools view this? In addition, if I were to get the serving position, I'd still plan on volunteering in inpatient facilities ~5hr/wk.
 

schnell8

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For the past 9 months I have worked at an outpatient clinic, accumulating somewhere between 400 and 500 hours as a PT aide. I love my job but I get paid minimum wage. In the near future, I may have the opportunity of taking a serving position at a high end restaurant, which means lots of tips. Id be taking home at least double at this job if I get it. If I get this job, should I let go of the PT job? How would schools view this? In addition, if I were to get the serving position, I'd still plan on volunteering in inpatient facilities ~5hr/wk.

It sounds crazy, but quit your PT Aide job. Why? One reason and one reason only. VARIETY. Let's say I had identical stats as you with the exception of hours. Let's say I had 200 hours but from 3 or 4 different settings. You obviously have more hours than me and we have identical stats so you would get in over me right? Wrong. There is a very good chance that I would get in over you because PT schools want more of the variety of settings over amount of hours. It is obvious that you already have the amount. But now you need the variety.

I might be a little hasty to tell you to quit your job as a PT Aide. The reality of it is this: If you can still work there but volunteer for inpatient settings such as hospitals and nursing homes, you would be in a perfect situation. However, bills are important too and trust me, your going to need every penny for your application fees, sending GRE scores, securing your seat with a confirmation deposit WHEN you get accepted. ;) So if you need the money, take the other job and get as many hours as you can in different settings aside from outpatient. Justify your decisions truthfully on your application when the time comes by stating that you quit your PT Aide job to get more experience in different settings and to save for upcoming application fees, costs, etc. As long you justify your decision to a decision that will further yourself in the world of PT, you will be fine. Anyways, get that VARIETY. It means more than the amount and you already have the amount! Get at LEAST 20+ hours in each new setting you explore and you will be sitting pretty good! Good luck!
 

okramango

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I agree with schnell - definitely take the higher paying job, and go get PT observation hours in some different settings. Your time working as a PT Aide will definitely benefit your application, both in terms of hours and in terms of gaining valuable experience that you can discuss in essays/interviews, but you've already done it and there's no reason to continue if you can get a higher paying job to support you through the application process.
 

NewTestament

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I agree with Schnell. Get rid of the aide job. Someone else needs it. You've fulfilled your duties there. It's on your resume now so staying there won't benefit you anymore. Start serving tables, earn a lot more cash, and observe somewhere else: SNF, hospital, sports rehab, etc.

Kevin
 

wright6

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Thank you, all, for your thoughtful replies. It seems to be the consensus that I should leave the PT job, which at the surface probably sounds crazy, but what's probably best for me now and in the future in regards to my hours of experience. Thanks for your help!
 

WarriorPT

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This is a tough one. Waiting tables is a good opportunity to work on your people skills. New faces every hour at multiple tables. These skills will come in handy with patient treatments, PT interviews, etc. And having additional hours in the same setting will not help you much now that you are past the 500 mark.

Consider the job, but still volunteer elsewhere to get more experience. PT schools like to see potential candidates who can manage a complex schedule--multitasking. This is what PT school is all about, and much of PT work is multitasking.

As a side note, I had a paid internship offer as a PT aide, and an unpaid internship working with a well-respected NCAA strength coach in California. The offers came at the same time. I had PT hours amassed, so I passed on the PT aide job. The other internship has served me well. Although unpaid I was able to use that experience to help shape my interests in sport.

______________________________
Licensed Physical Therapist
 

doctormichael

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It sounds crazy, but quit your PT Aide job. Why? One reason and one reason only. VARIETY. Let's say I had identical stats as you with the exception of hours. Let's say I had 200 hours but from 3 or 4 different settings. You obviously have more hours than me and we have identical stats so you would get in over me right? Wrong. There is a very good chance that I would get in over you because PT schools want more of the variety of settings over amount of hours. It is obvious that you already have the amount. But now you need the variety.

I might be a little hasty to tell you to quit your job as a PT Aide. The reality of it is this: If you can still work there but volunteer for inpatient settings such as hospitals and nursing homes, you would be in a perfect situation. However, bills are important too and trust me, your going to need every penny for your application fees, sending GRE scores, securing your seat with a confirmation deposit WHEN you get accepted. ;) So if you need the money, take the other job and get as many hours as you can in different settings aside from outpatient. Justify your decisions truthfully on your application when the time comes by stating that you quit your PT Aide job to get more experience in different settings and to save for upcoming application fees, costs, etc. As long you justify your decision to a decision that will further yourself in the world of PT, you will be fine. Anyways, get that VARIETY. It means more than the amount and you already have the amount! Get at LEAST 20+ hours in each new setting you explore and you will be sitting pretty good! Good luck!

thank you for share this advice with us it's really helpful for me
 
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