npatel1050

2+ Year Member
Jul 5, 2014
23
6
Status
Pharmacist
Hey all,
Let me start off by saying I went into pharmacy for the money. The wrong reason, I know, but this thread is not about patronizing my life decisions. Just trying to salvage what I can from my 6 years of pharmacy school.

Where my interests lie, have nothing to do with pharmacy (journalism, technology, cars).

So I need help finding a job with the degree I have. Not just any job though, I have some basic requirements.

100k+ salary, 9-5 hours, no weekends, federal holidays off, needs to be a job sitting (I hate standing in retail all day)
The more stress free, the better. I'd like to have flexibility (i.e. if I have a family emergency, I can leave work, coming in late if possible, leaving early if possible)
I hate work following me home, and refuse to work off the clock or more than what I'm paid for
I have retail experience (2+yrs), and some industry experience (<1yr)

Any suggestions?
 
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pharmdpharmd

5+ Year Member
Jul 6, 2012
83
26
Status
Pharmacist
what you looking for doesn't really exist and if does exist, then it's either the reward of a long, successful career with lots of hard work and some sacrificing or the good fortune of having rich, powerful, connected parents

Maybe if you put your head down, work hard, make the right connections, say the right things, and get lucky, you will get a VA or managed care position that close to that.. Buts it's definitely pharmacy related
 

DIPEA

5+ Year Member
Oct 5, 2013
370
223
Status
Pharmacy Student
It's hard to give you any suggestion without further details. How old are you? How much debt are you in? What is your financial objective, in short term & long term? What other skills do you have, i.e., programming, research? Are you willing to go back to school, i.e. for a PhD? Who do you want to be? What is the optimal career trajectory that is in your mind right now?
 

bacillus1

10+ Year Member
May 27, 2008
2,810
453
Status
Pharmacist
Hey all,
Let me start off by saying I went into pharmacy for the money. The wrong reason, I know, but this thread is not about patronizing my life decisions. Just trying to salvage what I can from my 6 years of pharmacy school.

Where my interests lie, have nothing to do with pharmacy (journalism, technology, cars).

So I need help finding a job with the degree I have. Not just any job though, I have some basic requirements.

100k+ salary, 9-5 hours, no weekends, federal holidays off, needs to be a job sitting (I hate standing in retail all day)
The more stress free, the better. I'd like to have flexibility (i.e. if I have a family emergency, I can leave work, coming in late if possible, leaving early if possible)
I hate work following me home, and refuse to work off the clock or more than what I'm paid for
I have retail experience (2+yrs), and some industry experience (<1yr)

Any suggestions?
This is basically my job, aside from working off the clock for maybe half an hour per week but coming in a few minutes late a few times a week to make up for it. This is what I did for it:
-PGY1 residency
-2.5 years of experience in a VA hospital in a very stressful and understaffed environment where i worked weekends, holidays, overnight, you name it
-Moved, twice. Currently in a major city, but one that many people my age want to move out of.

So yeah, these jobs are very tough to come by, and you have to pay your dues first.
 

msweph

5+ Year Member
Jun 27, 2013
2,294
1,038
Status
Pharmacist
This is basically my job, aside from working off the clock for maybe half an hour per week but coming in a few minutes late a few times a week to make up for it. This is what I did for it:
-PGY1 residency
-2.5 years of experience in a VA hospital in a very stressful and understaffed environment where i worked weekends, holidays, overnight, you name it
-Moved, twice. Currently in a major city, but one that many people my age want to move out of.

So yeah, these jobs are very tough to come by, and you have to pay your dues first.
What's your current job?
 

Topcat15

2+ Year Member
Mar 9, 2015
48
81
Status
Pharmacist
Academia meets most of your requirements, although work can sometimes follow you home there. But you'd almost certainly need a residency or fellowship and some connections to break into academia.
 
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gwarm01

10+ Year Member
Oct 7, 2009
2,450
3,222
Status
Pharmacist
This is basically my job, aside from working off the clock for maybe half an hour per week but coming in a few minutes late a few times a week to make up for it. This is what I did for it:
-PGY1 residency
-2.5 years of experience in a VA hospital in a very stressful and understaffed environment where i worked weekends, holidays, overnight, you name it
-Moved, twice. Currently in a major city, but one that many people my age want to move out of.

So yeah, these jobs are very tough to come by, and you have to pay your dues first.
Yeah, that's basically what I had to do minus the residency. Multiple cross-country moves, missed a lot of holidays and special events, worked evenings and weekends, then got a break in informatics. These jobs don't come easy.
 

jblil

7+ Year Member
Dec 1, 2010
1,185
715
East Coast
OP - I can think of a couple of such jobs, and one of my high school classmates had one. His body was found on an exit ramp to I-5 in LA. It took the police a few days to positively ID him.
 
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Lnsean

10+ Year Member
May 26, 2009
2,327
1,535
Status
Medical Student
Hey all,
Let me start off by saying I went into pharmacy for the money. The wrong reason, I know, but this thread is not about patronizing my life decisions. Just trying to salvage what I can from my 6 years of pharmacy school.

Where my interests lie, have nothing to do with pharmacy (journalism, technology, cars).

So I need help finding a job with the degree I have. Not just any job though, I have some basic requirements.

100k+ salary, 9-5 hours, no weekends, federal holidays off, needs to be a job sitting (I hate standing in retail all day)
The more stress free, the better. I'd like to have flexibility (i.e. if I have a family emergency, I can leave work, coming in late if possible, leaving early if possible)
I hate work following me home, and refuse to work off the clock or more than what I'm paid for
I have retail experience (2+yrs), and some industry experience (<1yr)

Any suggestions?
LMAO...wtf you smoking... I need your dealer's number stat.
 

escanoke

5+ Year Member
Nov 10, 2013
120
31
Boston,MA
Status
Pharmacy Student
You could be a drug dealer, that checks off your 100k job. It could be potentially a job you would have to work nights, evenings, and holidays but since you're working for yourself you can make your own hours. You might lose money doing so but you could force your customers to buy extra during the weekday so they are all set for the weekends. That's the beauty of drug dealing is you can turn your phone off whenever you want to and since what your selling is addictive, no matter how much of a pain you are, your customers will always come back.


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
 

lord999

Moderator Emeritus
15+ Year Member
Feb 20, 2002
2,725
2,799
DC
Status
Pharmacist, Academic Administration
Academia meets most of your requirements, although work can sometimes follow you home there. But you'd almost certainly need a residency or fellowship and some connections to break into academia.
I really don't know why so many on this board seem to think academia is some refuge. Can you enlighten me on what tenure job does not have an salary offset requirement nowadays? Publish or perish is so 1990s, it's now funding or perish. Teaching classes, coordinating your faculty teaching if you're the course director, keeping accredited, making time for your graduate students tending your laboratory (or doing your ghostwriting). If you're clinical track, you have a practice to maintain as well as interns to look after and you're not going to have a job for more than 2 years on average. If you're line tenure track, there's the stupid service committees you have to be on, the research laboratory meetings you have to chair, the endless professional begging you have to do to NIH, PhRMA, and at the conferences for just enough money to keep your labs ongoing, and hey, didn't you agree to give a talk somewhere that you haven't prepared for yet. Academia is the only career where it's common to say that I need to take time off to get more work done. Academia isn't the student-humping, pot-smoking, industry-money laundering Ole Miss plantation days anymore and probably never was that way for even most faculty (but if the lore is accurate, there's some real entertaining stories about what it was like to be in Ole Miss's pharmacognosy department back in the day). I like academia just fine, the environment is great and the spiritual rewards outstanding, but it's real work for real responsibility in order to get paid.

Some faculty just don't get the message though:
http://www.pharmacytimes.com/news/new-details-emerge-in-pharmacy-dean-sexual-assault-case

But the X'ers and the Millennial faculty do not have the same sort of package deal than in the old days. I like the deal better because the university does a better job of supporting my actual work, but even in the old days, it's not all honey and milk.

Oh, and most clinical faculty make 25-40% less than the common market rate that averages inpatient and outpatient.

To the Op, that rules out lots of jobs in Industry (as you probably know from work being brought home), technical fields such as Informatics (same thing), Regulatory (no training, no flexibility), Management (stress levels and also the nature of the business is different). Why do you think the accountants, lawyers (my wife), and finance make it well even though their education is comparable to ours? High stress, high risk, long hours, some people are pretty enough to not work (but that's a job all its own). You might as well say that I'm looking to walk on water and turn it into wine as well. And this is the modern pharmacy days, it's a hell of a lot less stressful, much higher paying, much safer, and better work conditions overall (hard to believe, but Walgreens and CVS used to suck real hard prior to 2000 and Rite Aid had a special reputation for being horrible prior to their first bankruptcy.)

However, if you're willing to relax on the pay start, why don't you go back to school and become an actuary in an insurance company or a mathematical statistician in civil service? I know quite a number (could have been one myself and married one who later became a lawyer) where it's a 9-5 in the office, has great flexibility, can work from home, has low stress, does not involve any personal risk of malpractice or killing people, has great job security. You just can't lose the company money avoidably and you can't be stupid.

(And just for you real old timers, there were some good old days. My parents conceived me at a pharmacy school Eli Lilly trip, anyone else have Eli Lilly tour stories for when they used to give tours to every pharmacy school? Could you imagine these student squares doing that now?)
 
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giga

U.S. Public Health Service
10+ Year Member
Aug 23, 2005
767
1,267
On the land and the sea for humanity
Status
Pharmacist
You could get a project manager job in industry or FDA. You would likely start off in the 80-90k range, but with promotion potential to 100k+ within a couple years. I know some people that really enjoy it and others who absolutely hate it, so YMMV. You do get to sit all day, though, and it's usually a 9-5, weekends and holidays off kind of gig. And it's generally not too high stress as long as you're good at keeping things organized, and after you get over the initial learning curve of learning the rules and regs and meeting procedures.

Here's a job announcement for ya: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/438625600/
 
Jan 12, 2016
35
8
Status
Pharmacist
The only job that seems to meet your requirements is the VA. Especially if you want every federal holiday off.
 

ldiot

2+ Year Member
Oct 7, 2015
1,619
922
Miami, FL
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Hey all,
Let me start off by saying I went into pharmacy for the money. The wrong reason, I know, but this thread is not about patronizing my life decisions. Just trying to salvage what I can from my 6 years of pharmacy school.

Where my interests lie, have nothing to do with pharmacy (journalism, technology, cars).

So I need help finding a job with the degree I have. Not just any job though, I have some basic requirements.

100k+ salary, 9-5 hours, no weekends, federal holidays off, needs to be a job sitting (I hate standing in retail all day)
The more stress free, the better. I'd like to have flexibility (i.e. if I have a family emergency, I can leave work, coming in late if possible, leaving early if possible)
I hate work following me home, and refuse to work off the clock or more than what I'm paid for
I have retail experience (2+yrs), and some industry experience (<1yr)

Any suggestions?
No weekends, federal holidays off, get to sit down, and you want to make 6 figures? Sounds like you'd have a hard time finding a job like this even if you weren't significantly limiting your options....
 

bacillus1

10+ Year Member
May 27, 2008
2,810
453
Status
Pharmacist
The only job that seems to meet your requirements is the VA. Especially if you want every federal holiday off.
Another misconception. Many pharmacists at the VA work weekends, holidays, etc... Most VA hospitals are open 24/7/365 and they do need pharmacists to work there during all those times. My current VA job is M-F 8-4:30 only with not working any federal holidays, but my last VA job was definitely not. That's another thing about VAs--they vary greatly in terms of how their pharmacy departments are run.
 

mentos

7+ Year Member
Nov 22, 2009
1,785
2,301
Status
LoL OP is either a troll or extremely entitled. Both are very common these days.

OP you forgot to include a big sign-on bonus, tuition reimbursement, 6 weeks vacation starting, stock options with fat dividends, and the ability to work from home preferably 100% of the time! Do not settle for anything but the best!!
 
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msweph

5+ Year Member
Jun 27, 2013
2,294
1,038
Status
Pharmacist
Looks like Director of Pharmacy is the job you're looking for. But work does follow you home, you're gonna get calls all the time from the staff pharmacists when **** goes wrong.
That's an awful recommendation for his requests. He wants to only be paid for the time he works.... Managers and directors always work > 40 hours
 
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BidingMyTime

Lost Shaker Of Salt
10+ Year Member
Oct 2, 2006
3,656
2,722
Illinois
Status
Pharmacist
So I need help finding a job with the degree I have. Not just any job though, I have some basic requirements.
100k+ salary, 9-5 hours, no weekends, federal holidays off, needs to be a job sitting (I hate standing in retail all day)
The more stress free, the better. I'd like to have flexibility (i.e. if I have a family emergency, I can leave work, coming in late if possible, leaving early if possible)
I hate work following me home, and refuse to work off the clock or more than what I'm paid for
I have retail experience (2+yrs), and some industry experience (<1yr)Any suggestions?
Are you for real????? Do you really not think that EVERY SINGLE PHARMACIST IN THE COUNTRY wants a job like that???? Bottom line, its extremely unlikely you will find a job like that...when you do find a job like that, you will be competing against literally hundreds of pharmacists as well (someone here posted about getting over 200 job applications for a staff hospital position!) If you want a job like that, as others have said, best bet is to do a residency and fellowship, then plan on working the crappiest hours for the next several years to build up your experience (or to get the hours you want expect to get substantially lower pay). This is no guarentee that you will get your dream job in the future, but it will give you a better chance at it.

(And just for you real old timers, there were some good old days. My parents conceived me at a pharmacy school Eli Lilly trip, anyone else have Eli Lilly tour stories for when they used to give tours to every pharmacy school? Could you imagine these student squares doing that now?)
Awwww. Now this is a sweet story! Sounds like you were were destined to go into pharmacy. I'm old enough that I got school Eli Lilly Trip, but no special stories to share like yours!
 

Topcat15

2+ Year Member
Mar 9, 2015
48
81
Status
Pharmacist
I really don't know why so many on this board seem to think academia is some refuge. Can you enlighten me on what tenure job does not have an salary offset requirement nowadays? Publish or perish is so 1990s, it's now funding or perish. Teaching classes, coordinating your faculty teaching if you're the course director, keeping accredited, making time for your graduate students tending your laboratory (or doing your ghostwriting). If you're clinical track, you have a practice to maintain as well as interns to look after and you're not going to have a job for more than 2 years on average. If you're line tenure track, there's the stupid service committees you have to be on, the research laboratory meetings you have to chair, the endless professional begging you have to do to NIH, PhRMA, and at the conferences for just enough money to keep your labs ongoing, and hey, didn't you agree to give a talk somewhere that you haven't prepared for yet. Academia is the only career where it's common to say that I need to take time off to get more work done. Academia isn't the student-humping, pot-smoking, industry-money laundering Ole Miss plantation days anymore and probably never was that way for even most faculty (but if the lore is accurate, there's some real entertaining stories about what it was like to be in Ole Miss's pharmacognosy department back in the day). I like academia just fine, the environment is great and the spiritual rewards outstanding, but it's real work for real responsibility in order to get paid.

Some faculty just don't get the message though:
http://www.pharmacytimes.com/news/new-details-emerge-in-pharmacy-dean-sexual-assault-case

But the X'ers and the Millennial faculty do not have the same sort of package deal than in the old days. I like the deal better because the university does a better job of supporting my actual work, but even in the old days, it's not all honey and milk.

Oh, and most clinical faculty make 25-40% less than the common market rate that averages inpatient and outpatient.

To the Op, that rules out lots of jobs in Industry (as you probably know from work being brought home), technical fields such as Informatics (same thing), Regulatory (no training, no flexibility), Management (stress levels and also the nature of the business is different). Why do you think the accountants, lawyers (my wife), and finance make it well even though their education is comparable to ours? High stress, high risk, long hours, some people are pretty enough to not work (but that's a job all its own). You might as well say that I'm looking to walk on water and turn it into wine as well. And this is the modern pharmacy days, it's a hell of a lot less stressful, much higher paying, much safer, and better work conditions overall (hard to believe, but Walgreens and CVS used to suck real hard prior to 2000 and Rite Aid had a special reputation for being horrible prior to their first bankruptcy.)

However, if you're willing to relax on the pay start, why don't you go back to school and become an actuary in an insurance company or a mathematical statistician in civil service? I know quite a number (could have been one myself and married one who later became a lawyer) where it's a 9-5 in the office, has great flexibility, can work from home, has low stress, does not involve any personal risk of malpractice or killing people, has great job security. You just can't lose the company money avoidably and you can't be stupid.

(And just for you real old timers, there were some good old days. My parents conceived me at a pharmacy school Eli Lilly trip, anyone else have Eli Lilly tour stories for when they used to give tours to every pharmacy school? Could you imagine these student squares doing that now?)
I work in academia (clinical track - I'm required to dedicate 25-55% effort to our inpatient service and amb care clinics) with a community job on the side, so I'm well aware of the challenges involved, but a day at work in academia feels like a vacation compared to a day at work in retail (though I do hate the days that I have to spend on inpatient service). I'm not implying academia is not real work but it does meet many of the items that OP asked for, although I even mentioned OP would be unlikely to obtain such a position given their background. However:

- I sit for the majority of the day (more than I want to, even)
- I have relative flexibility if I need to take off for a family emergency (far more than I could ever hope for in retail at any rate)
- I get weekends and federal holidays off, and most days I'm at work from 9-5 or less, and I get an awesome Christmas break

Sometimes work does come home with me, which I also mentioned, but 90%+ of the time I can finish everything I need to do during normal work hours. Is there a bunch of stupid bull**** here that I don't necessarily enjoy? Sure, but I'd be hard-pressed to think of any other job you can do as a pharmacist that meets so many of OP's requirements. And I'd be hard-pressed to think of any job, anywhere, that doesn't involve some degree of stupid bull****.
 
Jan 12, 2016
35
8
Status
Pharmacist
Another misconception. Many pharmacists at the VA work weekends, holidays, etc... Most VA hospitals are open 24/7/365 and they do need pharmacists to work there during all those times. My current VA job is M-F 8-4:30 only with not working any federal holidays, but my last VA job was definitely not. That's another thing about VAs--they vary greatly in terms of how their pharmacy departments are run.
Good point. I was thinking more along the lines of clinical pharmacists in the VA setting. At least for the VA setting I'm at, clinical pharmacy specialists are only staffed on non-federal holiday weekdays. But they can always volunteer to staff during the holidays for some extra pay.
 

bacillus1

10+ Year Member
May 27, 2008
2,810
453
Status
Pharmacist
Good point. I was thinking more along the lines of clinical pharmacists in the VA setting. At least for the VA setting I'm at, clinical pharmacy specialists are only staffed on non-federal holiday weekdays. But they can always volunteer to staff during the holidays for some extra pay.
Yep, that's not the case at every VA. This is my 3rd VA, and each one has run its pharmacy dept differently, especially in terms of how weekends/holidays work.
 

lord999

Moderator Emeritus
15+ Year Member
Feb 20, 2002
2,725
2,799
DC
Status
Pharmacist, Academic Administration
Good point. I was thinking more along the lines of clinical pharmacists in the VA setting. At least for the VA setting I'm at, clinical pharmacy specialists are only staffed on non-federal holiday weekdays. But they can always volunteer to staff during the holidays for some extra pay.
Yeah, I assume you practice in a Class IIB or III VA as that would not be acceptable manpower under normal circumstances for a IA-IC or IIA Sta3n outside of Christmas, Thanksgiving, and New Years Day now. On the other hand, I'm really a fan that the quietest practices are the Class III VA's (although as the politics work, every single Class III off and on gets targeted for forced integration with the nearest IIA or I).
 
Last edited:
Jan 12, 2016
35
8
Status
Pharmacist
Yeah, I assume you practice in a Class IIB or III VA as that would not be acceptable manpower under normal circumstances for a IA-IC or IIA Sta3n outside of Christmas, Thanksgiving, and New Years Day now. On the other hand, I'm really a fan that the quietest practices are the Class III VA's (although as the politics work, every single Class III off and on gets targeted for forced integration with the nearest IIA or I).
I know it's class II, not sure A or B. Do you have the link to look that up? Class I VAs have clinical pharmacists in the amb care setting work on federal holidays? Inpatient, I can see 24 hour staff required (which we do have here). I don't see the need for clinical pharmacists to have clinic days on federal holidays or weekends.
 

bacillus1

10+ Year Member
May 27, 2008
2,810
453
Status
Pharmacist
I know it's class II, not sure A or B. Do you have the link to look that up? Class I VAs have clinical pharmacists in the amb care setting work on federal holidays? Inpatient, I can see 24 hour staff required (which we do have here). I don't see the need for clinical pharmacists to have clinic days on federal holidays or weekends.
No, but I worked at a Ia before, and their am care pharmacists rotated through outpatient pharmacy every 6th weekend or so. Not sure what class I am at now, guessing Ib...am care people don't work weekends, and inpatient is not hybrid here, so the staff pharmacists work weekends while the clinical ones do not.
 

lord999

Moderator Emeritus
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Feb 20, 2002
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I know it's class II, not sure A or B. Do you have the link to look that up? Class I VAs have clinical pharmacists in the amb care setting work on federal holidays? Inpatient, I can see 24 hour staff required (which we do have here). I don't see the need for clinical pharmacists to have clinic days on federal holidays or weekends.
There's a vaww.vssc.med.va.gov internal link that shows the complexity of your medical center.

The definition has both "objective" and subjective (in the case of one station in Oregon, it's definitely political) criteria, but as you go up the chain:

III: Lacks a core service (Inpatient, NHCU (CLC), Outpatient) - Does not require 24 hour pharmacy, policy for on-call required - Clinical Pharmacy Coordinator and Associate Chief are the same person.
IIB: Has all three core services, only Standard (the very minimum) surgical - Does not require 24 hour pharmacy, on-call required - Rates a GS-13 Clinical Pharmacy Coordinator separate from the associate chief.
IIA: Intermediate surgical or E/R - Does require 24 pharmacy coverage, in the present day, it practically means 24 hour pharmacy rather than on-call due to JC
IC: Both intermediate surgical and E/R. At this level, the GS-14 Associate Chief may be plural (an Associate Chief for Inpatient/Outpatient being the most common, the other arrangement is Associate Chief for Operations/Clinical which is mostly a West Coast thing).
IB: Complex Surgical (24 hours of clinical pharmacy specialist coverage at the Inpatient level, not necessarily Outpatient) - At this level, there may be more than one GS-14 Associate Chiefs to be little chiefs to deal with the larger divisions and there may be GS-13 Clinical Pharmacy Specialists as pure clinical directors rather than practicing staff.
IA - Has trauma (Must have 24 hour Inpatient and Outpatient pharmacist coverage (either situated at the field in the ER intake or the basement levels). Almost certainly are the Clinical Pharmacy Coordinator and the Residency Program Director (or if they are second-years not under the PGY-1 RPD, the Educational Program Director) are separate positions.

Whether or not your CPS's actually run a clinic is up to the front office. It actually doesn't have very much to do with pharmacy. If your clinical coordinator is an arrogant fool and jeopardizes relationships with PACT and/or CoS and/or the PCS Nurse V, watch as your space for clinics and offices get repurposed for other uses as particularly if the CoS becomes hostile. However, the pharmacy is obligated to provide that sort of service coverage meaning that the basement staff usually has someone who is residency trained or BCPS that can deal with clinical pharmacy questions. The part of the VA that does scheduled Visits (I mean Encounters in the NPCD sense), only the IA's are definitely required to provide 24 hour coverage due to the trauma implications, but any VA with an ER has to provide for clinical pharmacy services (not just dispensing) at the Outpatient level in order for the E/R to exist.

The bastard deal is that at the larger medical centers, it's quite possible within the VHACO policy that you could be a clinical pharmacy specialist (a full 13), yet be working the outpatient counter or inpatient basement to meet the service requirements even though no one really uses you as a clinical pharmacist as they understandably mistake you for being an operational one. In the old days, when there was a separation of the operational (11), clinical (12), and clinical specialist (13), the pharmacy chief would have to include a 12 on staff for 24 hours in the larger centers. Now that the new credential policy makes every pharmacist start at 12, this is a moot point since every pharmacist in the VA is a clinical pharmacist (although the other federal services retain the 9 and 11 for operational pharmacist staff).
 
Last edited:

bacillus1

10+ Year Member
May 27, 2008
2,810
453
Status
Pharmacist
There's a vaww.vssc.med.va.gov internal link that shows the complexity of your medical center.
I typed in that website in (vaww.vssc.med.va.gov) while at work, and it didn't work. Another site says mine is level 1, but doesn't say if it's a, b, or c. By definition, sounds like 1B.
 

lord999

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Feb 20, 2002
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Elle928

7+ Year Member
Jun 9, 2010
49
19
East coast
Status
Pharmacist
Hey all,
Let me start off by saying I went into pharmacy for the money. The wrong reason, I know, but this thread is not about patronizing my life decisions. Just trying to salvage what I can from my 6 years of pharmacy school.

Where my interests lie, have nothing to do with pharmacy (journalism, technology, cars).

So I need help finding a job with the degree I have. Not just any job though, I have some basic requirements.

100k+ salary, 9-5 hours, no weekends, federal holidays off, needs to be a job sitting (I hate standing in retail all day)
The more stress free, the better. I'd like to have flexibility (i.e. if I have a family emergency, I can leave work, coming in late if possible, leaving early if possible)
I hate work following me home, and refuse to work off the clock or more than what I'm paid for
I have retail experience (2+yrs), and some industry experience (<1yr)

Any suggestions?
You could get a project manager job in industry or FDA. You would likely start off in the 80-90k range, but with promotion potential to 100k+ within a couple years. I know some people that really enjoy it and others who absolutely hate it, so YMMV. You do get to sit all day, though, and it's usually a 9-5, weekends and holidays off kind of gig. And it's generally not too high stress as long as you're good at keeping things organized, and after you get over the initial learning curve of learning the rules and regs and meeting procedures.

Here's a job announcement for ya: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/438625600/
I know this thread is a few months old, but I just randomly stumbled upon it. Interesting thread!

OP- I am wondering if you ever found a job that fit these requirements?

For everyone else- The OP Is not crazy. Jobs like this DO exist, but they are very difficult to get unless you are very well connected. Pharmacists at the FDA have all of these benefits. Like Giga said, they start in the 90k range and usually go up to 100k pretty quickly. Benefits include working from home a couple of times a week and flex scheduling. The VA definitely has jobs like this ( although i don't know how desirable the locations are), CMS, CDC, and SAMHSA are a couple of other examples. You'd be surprised at the options when you start looking at more non-traditional sites.
 

CetiAlphaFive

2+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2016
4,103
4,543
Status
Pharmacist
Hey all,
Let me start off by saying I went into pharmacy for the money. The wrong reason, I know, but this thread is not about patronizing my life decisions. Just trying to salvage what I can from my 6 years of pharmacy school.

Where my interests lie, have nothing to do with pharmacy (journalism, technology, cars).

So I need help finding a job with the degree I have. Not just any job though, I have some basic requirements.

100k+ salary, 9-5 hours, no weekends, federal holidays off, needs to be a job sitting (I hate standing in retail all day)
The more stress free, the better. I'd like to have flexibility (i.e. if I have a family emergency, I can leave work, coming in late if possible, leaving early if possible)
I hate work following me home, and refuse to work off the clock or more than what I'm paid for
I have retail experience (2+yrs), and some industry experience (<1yr)

Any suggestions?
LOOOL.
This has to be a joke post.

EDIT:

Although... My independent job does meet a good number of his requirements.


Maybe OP should hang around outside of morning report at their local hospital and snag a nerdy resident to marry?

That or hang around their local dental school?
 
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lord999

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Pharmacist, Academic Administration
I know this thread is a few months old, but I just randomly stumbled upon it. Interesting thread!

OP- I am wondering if you ever found a job that fit these requirements?

For everyone else- The OP Is not crazy. Jobs like this DO exist, but they are very difficult to get unless you are very well connected. Pharmacists at the FDA have all of these benefits. Like Giga said, they start in the 90k range and usually go up to 100k pretty quickly. Benefits include working from home a couple of times a week and flex scheduling. The VA definitely has jobs like this ( although i don't know how desirable the locations are), CMS, CDC, and SAMHSA are a couple of other examples. You'd be surprised at the options when you start looking at more non-traditional sites.
We all work for a living, it's just what constitutes "work" that changes. As one of those VA pharmacists in a VACO job that has 4 hours a week of defined responsibility, it should be cake.

What I criticize and actually do not think is possible is that there really is a job that doesn't constitute work. Whether it seems like work to you or not depends on the holder. My classmate who was a 6' 7" Nordic guy who is the life of the party is a current PhRMA VP who is in one of those supposed jobs, but what is effortless for him, most can't do as they don't have his charisma.


That's why almost everyone in those jobs has both a day job and a harder "night" job. Those in the industry who have "parties and plaques" jobs can't separate their job from their lifestyle, it's constantly about being a paragon for corporate values, so fails the off work criteria as well as being inherently unstable. The civil service jobs that are like that (as Giga should know) oftentimes are either the result of a implied training position (what Giga has right now), long drop sinecure that the civil service can't fire someone over but need to be done (classical reason for the existence of Patient Education (not professional education) and Patient Safety pharmacists was to use those positions as a dumping ground for pharmacists who were screw ups and the ADPAC (VA IT/Informatics Pharmacist) routinely was a dumping ground for pharmacists who caused too many veteran complaints), or have jobs that have very little daytime responsibility but huge nighttime responsibility (the day job of a VISN pharmacist is extremely light in order to deal with the interminable information requests from Central, the concurrent investigations from IG, and other one-off crises). And then there's the adult day-care center jobs of being a Director, that a mark of an excellent Director means that there is nothing to do as your staff have it covered. Most Directors aren't competent much less excellent.

So, four hours a week of defined duties works out to also mean anywhere between 0 and 60 hours of weekly crisis duty on some screwup. For a real sinecure sort of a job, the ruthless economy that we are in right now is less tolerant of deadweight (even academia, even civil service). Most who think certain jobs are sinecures don't really know what the actual job is about. It might not be stressful (mine actually isn't as I'm the inquisitor, not the questioned), but there are very few complete sinecures out there and they take work to maintain. The trick to really being professional is to make it look effortless. The very best I know understand that work is neither a job or a career but a lifestyle.
 
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