junkct

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Mar 12, 2008
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Hi, I don't really understand this answer... maybe I just don't understand Bernoulli's equation very well. If someone could explain it to me, that would be awesome! also, how come doing the experiment at a higher altitude wouldn't decrease the velocity (since it would increase pgh)?

blah, I tried to copy&paste it, but kaplan won't let me :(
 

TieuBachHo

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Jul 23, 2008
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Bernoulli is an equation of continuity (usually in references of point 1 and 2). As stated in the passage, using the fluid at the top of the beaker as a reference. So, point 1 is the fluid at top and point 2 is the drilled hole. The rest is just in the explanation.

The high in pgh is the difference between those two points. Therefore, they are exactly the same regardless of which altitudes. Does this clear your air?
 

junkct

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Mar 12, 2008
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Bernoulli is an equation of continuity (usually in references of point 1 and 2). As stated in the passage, using the fluid at the top of the beaker as a reference. So, point 1 is the fluid at top and point 2 is the drilled hole. The rest is just in the explanation.

The high in pgh is the difference between those two points. Therefore, they are exactly the same regardless of which altitudes. Does this clear your air?

ooook, so 'h' refers to the height of the water relative to the container, NOT the surroundings, right? that makes sense, thanks!
 
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