Mindy325

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Hi guys,

I'm new here. I just found the forum a few days ago. Is anyone familiar with Somnia?

They are taking over my trauma hospital and want to do all cases, not just endoscopy like at other hospitals.

Does anyone have any idea what the setup would be like?

What is it like to work for them?

Their website is fairly vague. Do they compensate their workers adequately?

What should I watch out for?

Thanks in advance.
 

sevoflurane

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Yep. That pretty much sums it up.

They will use you as cheap labor, secure a contract with the hospital all the while "administrators" enjoy a good couple days a week at the golf course.
I hope to never work for an AMC. Any competent anesthesia group does NOT need a "Management Company". IMO, It is bad to work for them or to encourage their "Management Practice". All you are doing when hiring a management company is giving out a % of your paycheck for something your group can do themselves.

Additionally you loose control of the group.... So the guy whose been at the hospital for 25yrs. gets canned for a new grad that will work for significantly less. 2 years down the road the new grad realizes what's up, leaves the AMC and the cycle repeats itself.

While I'm sure there are some decent ones out there, I'm very skeptical when AMC's like Sheridian exists.
 

aneftp

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Somonia took over my buddy's hospital in Bakersfield, CA 3 years ago and the situation has been chaotic ever sense.

Seriously my friend's group (they had been there 10 plus year) was arguing over $500K subsidy in a multi million dollar contract/multi year contract.

Well Somonia came in, said they could do it "cheaper". They blew threw that 500K "subsidy" savings the administrators thought they were saving in less than 6 months. Next thing you know the administrtor who did the contract with Somonia is out of a job.

But business is business and where's there's money to be made, there will be AMC's.

There's a very shady private practice group that's essentially turned themselves into their own AMC's. It's called FOAA (originally Fair Oaks anesthesia group). I wouldn't trust anything dealing with this group in a million years.

This group has now taken over the Newport News contract. So it's not just the regular business guys taking over contracts. It's anesthesiologist/groups taking over contracts and shaving money on top of what the administrators are givings.

Greed is everywhere. Live within your means and you will be fine.
 

periopdoc

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Welcome to SDN. I interviewed with the Somnia group in Everett, WA, and I have posted some of my findings in different threads here. Try searching for Somnia and Everett.

My most recent post on this place was on CRNA issues there.

Briefly, Somnia is a relatively new, New York based AMC who traditionally has setup ambulatory and office based anesthesia services. They recently expanded into hospital based services as well.

In Everett, they run a side-by-side model where CRNA's provide independent (opt-out) care alongside the anesthesiologists who do their own cases. This will, in all likelihood, be the same in the state where Somnia recently expanded. The "worker-bee" anesthesiologist has no day to day interaction with the CRNA's other than seeing them across the PACU etc.

There are two "managing partners" who's role and income are unclear. Knowing where these two partners practiced previously, Somnia must be paying them pretty well. When I interviewed, I met with these two partners, but they told me that they have no role in hiring other than okaying applicants. The hiring decisions come from Somnia Inc. This was born out by other individuals who interviewed there. Once okayed to work there, I had to contact "Guido" with Somnia who tried to negotiate an employment package that I couldn't refuse. It was nigh unto impossible to get in touch with anyone at Somnia by phone or email. Eventually I emailed every recruiter listed on their website before I finally got someone to respond. If they are that hard to talk with when they are recruiting you, can you imagine what it must be like if you are an employee with a grievance???

Financially the salary they offered was competitive for the region. It was probably at about the 75th %ile for income in the region... EXCEPT... it wasn't until I pinned them down about it that I realized they are negotiating an entire package. Once you have agreed to a salary, all benefits are then subtracted from that final number. It isn't exactly negotiating in bad faith, but neither were they forthcoming about it or about the actual cost of any benefits.

The only area where they were frankly untruthful with me is that the managing partners told me that there would not be a no-compete clause in my contract. Somnia told me that that type of contract was only offered to the initial employees, and for all current and future contracts a non-compete clause would be part of the package. I honestly believe that the managing partners were unaware of this and were not lying to me, but at a minimum it demonstrates just how screwed up a system it is when the managing partners are not informed of changes in contract negotiation practices.

Organizationally, it is pretty confusing. The chain of command is completely opaque to the interviewee and, in fact, to the employees that I spoke to as well. If problems arise at the hospital, I do not know if the hospital admin talks to the faceless admins in NY, the "managing partners", or to the individual employee. Since you are not an employee of the hospital, nor are the "managing partners" really your supervisors, I can see a lot of room for confusion. They were not willing to offer me a contract 6 months out, preferring to hire people that were immediately available, even though they had a historical need stretching beyond six months. There was no way I was going to turn down other offers in the hopes that Somnia would have something for me when I was ready to join the workforce.

I was pretty blunt with them that they will have a very hard time recruiting quality applicants if they were not willing to offer positions in a reasonable time frame.

How can you recruit top notch graduates then? The prime hiring season for people coming out of training is December through February when we negotiate contracts for the upcoming year. Last year, the only graduating trainees from my program that took jobs after this season were individuals who were either desperate to be in one specific location and took abusive, sub-par jobs, or were sub-par trainees who were declined jobs while there were still good candidates on the market. Who am I to tell you how to run your company, but if you want to recruit top tier graduates, you will have a challenge if you do not want to negotiate contracts during the prime season.

I am a top-tier graduate with an impressive CV, and I have been overwhelmed with offers from across the country. Most groups have even been willing to adjust the starting date to late autumn at my request. If you want to recruit individuals like myself, you may want to consider adjusting your strategy. If I were to hold out for a position with you in July only to find out that you did not have a job for me, then it would be difficult for me to find even a sub-par job.
Their response was very telling

I absolutely understand what you saying and to get good quality it means we have to wait awhile, Somnia does welcome new graduates, however at times it is difficult to make an offer so far out when our staffing needs are immediate…
Interpreted, quality doctors are not as important to us as warm bodies in the rooms. Their response was sent to me January 28th, and I was requesting a start date of July 1st.

From my friend who worked there, the call was significantly more frequent than promised, the environment was not particularly supportive, and "POD, if you have any other options you really should take one of them."

Take what I said with a grain of salt. I am particularly unhappy with the way they dealt with me (it was quite a contrast to the private groups who went out of their way to work with me and actually RECRUIT me) and, though I have tried to be fair and measured in my statements about them, some of my contempt for the way they dealt with me shows through.

If you are looking to be an employee with no role with the greater community of physicians within your system, a Somnia gig may be right up your alley. Or if, like me, you are looking for the best heart gig in Seattle, you might be willing to put up with their weaknesses and lower income levels.

You may not have an option to join the Somnia group if you have a non-compete through your previous group. I am certain that Somnia isn't going to buy out that clause for you, and I doubt you want to spend that much of your own money.

Hope that helps. Feel free to PM me if you have questions that you would rather not post in a public forum. I will be happy to try to answer them.

- pod
 
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Mindy325

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Thanks for all the responses. They pretty much confirm what some of my colleagues have been saying. I'm sure a few will stay on. I'm tempted because I live close, and pickings are slim in this area.

So the CRNAs will most likely do their own rooms while the anesthesiologists do their own cases? Somnia hasn't revealed their model yet. My colleagues had been talking about nightmare scenarios where it would be a 1:3 or even gasp 1:4 anesthesiolgist to CRNA ratio for supervision. Would the surgeons be covering the CRNAs? When it comes to being on call, I guess it would have to be the anesthesiologist who covers them.

That's really horrible about all the benefits being subtracted from the total salary offered. That was intentional deception. I wouldn't have even thought to ask about something like that. Sounds like they really play hardball.

As for a non-compete clause, I recall the current out-going chief saying he would never enforce it.

Well, I know I'm jumping ahead. I don't even know if I'll be offered a position, but thanks again guys for giving me a heads up about these things.
 

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In Everett, they run a side-by-side model where CRNA's provide independent (opt-out) care alongside the anesthesiologists who do their own cases. This will, in all likelihood, be the same in the state where Somnia recently expanded. The "worker-bee" anesthesiologist has no day to day interaction with the CRNA's other than seeing them across the PACU etc.
I have alwaya thought this was strange practice arrangement. Every now and then there is a thread on sermo detailing the horror associated with such a practice.
 

periopdoc

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So the CRNAs will most likely do their own rooms while the anesthesiologists do their own cases?
If you live in an opt-out state then yes, in all probability Somnia will utilize this model. From their viewpoint it makes the most sense as it maximizes their profits and minimizes the number of new people that they need to hire before they are up an running at full speed. I suspect that they will have 2 anesthesiologist managers to be available to the CRNAs as needed.


My colleagues had been talking about nightmare scenarios where it would be a 1:3 or even gasp 1:4 anesthesiolgist to CRNA ratio for supervision.
That is the best case scenario for you if you are not in an opt-out state (if you are in an opt-out state, you may find that working alongside independent CRNA's is best case). Given what I have seen from Somnia in the past, I would be very surprised if they let you go 1:3 or 1:4 medical direction model. I would bet they go with a 1:6 medical supervision model if this is in a non opt-out state.

Would the surgeons be covering the CRNAs? When it comes to being on call, I guess it would have to be the anesthesiologist who covers them.
All depend on the opt-out status of your state. Washington is an opt-out state and I believe that the anesthesiologists at Everett take all of the general call and the CRNA's cover OB call independently. I do know that there is no supervision or direction of the CRNAs, I just can't remember if they took any call or if it was all left to the anesthesiologist. There was no additional pay for call so the anesthesiologists that I talked to felt that the call burden was onerous.


Sounds like they really play hardball.
They are business sharks who are in it to maximize their profits at the expense of all else (IMHO). Yes they play hard ball with everyone.

As for a non-compete clause, I recall the current out-going chief saying he would never enforce it.
Get it in writing and have your lawyer verify it before you sign anything with a new group. The cost to any anesthesiologist from the prior group that wanted to sign with Somnia after they took over Everett was 3 years pay. Needless to say none of them could afford it and Somnia wasn't about to pay that kind of money to keep good, trusted anesthesiologists around. They hired a whole new crew. The last thing you need is to take a less desirable job with lower pay only to have your old group decide that they actually DO want to enforce that clause. I don't know how your group is set up, but mine is a legal entity consisting of all of the partners, each of whom has an equal vote in deciding things like this. Your ex-chief may not be of a mind to enforce the clause, but if a simple majority of your group votes otherwise, he is legally bound to enforce it. Get it in writing.


Well, I know I'm jumping ahead. I don't even know if I'll be offered a position, but thanks again guys for giving me a heads up about these things.
Somnia will be desperate to get warm bodies onto stools. You will almost certainly be able to get a position depending on your non-compete situation.

Glad to help any way I can. I hope to never find myself in your position, but after having seen it happen at Prov Everett, Northwest Hospital in Seattle, and again in Portland, it is clear that we can't take anything for granted in this day and age as medicine becomes less and less a profession and more a business driven by no motivation except the bottom line.

Good luck to you.

- pod
 

TecmoBowl

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Somnia contacted me yesterday.

Yours is a hospital in the Bronx area correct?

Watch out. The medico-legal environment in the Bronx is comparable only to Cook County in Illinois.

I would not work for Somnia.

Instead, I would try and negotiate my own contract with the hospital.

Next, publicize the villains who run the organization.

Libel/Slander? Not if what you're describing are accurate descriptions of how the company does "business"...ummm cough cough... I mean practice Medicine.

Lastly, would you be surprised if these cretins cursed out of their mothers' wombs are the very scum that are promoting independent CRNA practice?

What do you think?

A special place awaits them in hell, and if I happen to go to heaven, I'll ask for a day pass to hell to make these villains' lives after death as miserable and painful as possible.

See you in Hell Somnia, Sheridan!

See you in hell..
 
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Mindy325

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I heard something sickening through the grapevine. It looks like anesthesia will be coming under the department of nursing at my place. I'm not even talking about CRNAs, but regular perioperative nurses. The story is getting worse and worse.
 

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I can't even imagine. Spineless.

I would fight it all the way until I found my new practice.

 

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I heard something sickening through the grapevine. It looks like anesthesia will be coming under the department of nursing at my place. I'm not even talking about CRNAs, but regular perioperative nurses. The story is getting worse and worse.

IF and when that happens, leave.
 

leaverus

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I heard something sickening through the grapevine. It looks like anesthesia will be coming under the department of nursing at my place. I'm not even talking about CRNAs, but regular perioperative nurses. The story is getting worse and worse.
That doesn't even make sense. What does it mean for anesthesia to come under the nursing dept? Will the OR nurses be making up your call schedule and assigning your rooms?
 

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I heard something sickening through the grapevine. It looks like anesthesia will be coming under the department of nursing at my place. I'm not even talking about CRNAs, but regular perioperative nurses. The story is getting worse and worse.
Many military hospitals, including mine, are organized such that the department of anesthesiology (as well as gen surg, OB/GYN, ortho, etc) all fall under the domain of the director of surgical services, who is often a nurse (ours is). Our OR director (a periop nurse) rubberstamp-clicks my computer "timecards" and the hospital XO is a midwife. These administrative positions don't have any impact on medical decision making, and it's rare that our internal scheduling is influenced by them.

I'm curious as to what exactly your hospital means by the anes dept "coming under" the dept of nursing. It sounds ominous and perplexing but in truth it may not be. Devil's in the details regarding how much power the anes dept yields.
 

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OH MY GOD!

I hope that the M.Ds/D.Os in your group have more spine and strength than be the bearer of such news/gossip.

I can't help but feel a certain sense of... I can't describe it.... well I feel ashamed that a Department such as yours would even come so far as to even leak the reak of this stench!

Seriously! Before even posting such ridiculousness on this forum, you MUST contact the NYSSA, the ASA, the MSSNY and what ever else you can imagine.

Are you crazy???!

WTF?!

Quash this NOW.

I'm pretty sure you're in NY, in the Bronx... correct?

That's the latest Somnia contract so..

YOU ARE A DOCTOR! YOU WENT TO MEDICAL SCHOOL! NOW LEARN TO FIGHT! WHY DO WE HAVE SO MANY WUSSIES IN OUR FIELD! OY VEI!


I heard something sickening through the grapevine. It looks like anesthesia will be coming under the department of nursing at my place. I'm not even talking about CRNAs, but regular perioperative nurses. The story is getting worse and worse.
 
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periopdoc

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OH MY GOD!

I hope that the M.Ds/D.Os in your group have more spine and strength than be the bearer of such news/gossip...
Dude, they just got F-I-R-E-D. Unless one of the members of their group is a civilian on the hospital board they have no recourse, or say as to the makeup of the new department. They can choose to work for the new company, if their non-compete allows them, but they have already lost their existing contract and therefore any staff privileges and therefore any say in the hierarchy of the new department.

They can bitch and moan all they want, but that is the extent of the power they wield. What can the NYSSA, ASA, and MSSNY do? Lodge a formal complaint with the hospital? That will certainly get the hospital to renege on their new contract with Somnia :laugh:.

Any chance they had to change the direction of this thing ended the second the hospital signed the contract with Somnia. Perhaps they could have prevented the admin from going with Somnia in the first place by addressing admin concerns, but likely as not they got blindsided by their admin.

It is happening all over America. This is business, not medicine... Be prepared, cause it could happen to you.

- pod
 
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Mman

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It is happening all over America. This is business, not medicine... Be prepared, cause it could happen to you.

- pod
That's why a group needs to be indispensable to a hospital beyond staffing ORs. Sit on those stupid committees. Make some donations to whatever charitable thing they are setting up. Integrate yourselves within the larger framework of the hospital so that when some outside company comes in and offers to undercut you on the OR staffing that the hospital knows about everything else your group does.
 
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TecmoBowl

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No..I realize they were undercut. I was saying that even if they were to leave the place, the NYSSA/ASA should be aware that a PHYSICIAN specialty was to be placed under Nursing. I wonder if the ACGME would even have something to say about this.

However, as someone alluded to earlier, it may just be that the departments, just like many other OR related departments, were to be placed within the administrative scope of the nursing manager. That's the case in many places.

I hope the group does not for one second think they are under a Nurse's direction etc.

Not in NY anyway.

That was the issue that was angering me, that someone says do and this is how it will be, and many in our specialty and Medicine, just say ummm reallly.... umm.... ooookaaayyy.

As with Somnia/Sheridan, yeah I know the backdoor deals happen a lot.

And yes, we as Anesthesiologists need to give "value" beyond just our clinical duties.


Dude, they just got F-I-R-E-D. Unless one of the members of their group is a civilian on the hospital board they have no recourse, or say as to the makeup of the new department. They can choose to work for the new company, if their non-compete allows them, but they have already lost their existing contract and therefore any staff privileges and therefore any say in the hierarchy of the new department.

They can bitch and moan all they want, but that is the extent of the power they wield. What can the NYSSA, ASA, and MSSNY do? Lodge a formal complaint with the hospital? That will certainly get the hospital to renege on their new contract with Somnia :laugh:.

Any chance they had to change the direction of this thing ended the second the hospital signed the contract with Somnia. Perhaps they could have prevented the admin from going with Somnia in the first place by addressing admin concerns, but likely as not they got blindsided by their admin.

It is happening all over America. This is business, not medicine... Be prepared, cause it could happen to you.

- pod
 

TecmoBowl

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For instance, can the department secretary serve on a committee of some sort?

Unless one of the members of their group is a civilian on the hospital board they have no recourse, or say as to the makeup of the new department.
- pod
 

topflight

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Thanks for all the responses. They pretty much confirm what some of my colleagues have been saying. I'm sure a few will stay on. I'm tempted because I live close, and pickings are slim in this area.

So the CRNAs will most likely do their own rooms while the anesthesiologists do their own cases? Somnia hasn't revealed their model yet. My colleagues had been talking about nightmare scenarios where it would be a 1:3 or even gasp 1:4 anesthesiolgist to CRNA ratio for supervision. Would the surgeons be covering the CRNAs? When it comes to being on call, I guess it would have to be the anesthesiologist who covers them.

That's really horrible about all the benefits being subtracted from the total salary offered. That was intentional deception. I wouldn't have even thought to ask about something like that. Sounds like they really play hardball.

As for a non-compete clause, I recall the current out-going chief saying he would never enforce it.

Well, I know I'm jumping ahead. I don't even know if I'll be offered a position, but thanks again guys for giving me a heads up about these things.
hey i know what hospital that is. in the bronx right. i will pm you.
 

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For many clinicians, working for an AMC offers opportunities that working directly for a hospital cannot. And many hospitals prefer to work with an Anesthesia Management firm because they offer value in a number of areas. Hospitals have to run as a business and an AMC partners with the hospital to meet business objectives. Both focus on delivering quality while looking at ways to better manage costs. If a current team of anesthesiologists is having challenges and the hospital decides to change the model, often those same anesthesiologists can retain their jobs by then working for the AMC. It's important to get multiple points of view before making a decision as there are many clinicians who are happy working for an AMC.
 

chilton

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Thanks for all the responses. They pretty much confirm what some of my colleagues have been saying. I'm sure a few will stay on. I'm tempted because I live close, and pickings are slim in this area.
Hei, Dont panic! just go find out what the new AMC can offer you. If it looks good, why hesitate to consider? BTW you can look for new picks while working, if the AMC doesn't deliver what they promise.

There is always an option !! Its business and let us look at this problem logical.
 

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Hei, Dont panic! just go find out what the new AMC can offer you. If it looks good, why hesitate to consider? BTW you can look for new picks while working, if the AMC doesn't deliver what they promise.

There is always an option !! Its business and let us look at this problem logical.
I've heard more than one first-hand stories about working for AMC's...while you work for them it's "great." If you want to leave for any reason they will blackball you. Even if you don't suck and are great, they will make sure you are portrayed as someone who they didn't want anyways.
 

Jay K

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Hei, Dont panic! just go find out what the new AMC can offer you. If it looks good, why hesitate to consider? BTW you can look for new picks while working, if the AMC doesn't deliver what they promise.

There is always an option !! Its business and let us look at this problem logical.
Goodnight, if this isn't a shill for an AMC.

One last piece to think on: If the AMC doesn't honor their agreement/contract with you and deliver everything promised, what are you going to do? Sue them? Your legal costs and time lost away from work and earning will probably result in net loss.

I'm sure the AMC can afford more a/o better lawyers than yourself... and in the end what will you win? The right to work for them some more? Do you really think you'll get damages? I'm sure they'll tie you up in court "forever."

Don't get in bed with the devil. You're not gonna win.

Furthermore, they can damage and libel your reputation. What will you do when you're looking for another job? Sue them to "fix" your professional reputation? This happens all the time in the "business world." If you don't have greater or equal resources to fight your prior employer, you're just going to cut your losses, lick your wounds and move on.

Move before that happens, and they've had a chance to use you.
 
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sevoflurane

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For many clinicians, working for an AMC offers opportunities that working directly for a hospital cannot. And many hospitals prefer to work with an Anesthesia Management firm because they offer value in a number of areas. Hospitals have to run as a business and an AMC partners with the hospital to meet business objectives. Both focus on delivering quality while looking at ways to better manage costs. If a current team of anesthesiologists is having challenges and the hospital decides to change the model, often those same anesthesiologists can retain their jobs by then working for the AMC. It's important to get multiple points of view before making a decision as there are many clinicians who are happy working for an AMC.
Weak. Why don't you tell me exactly what an AMC can offer that a well run group of highly educated/motivated MD's cannot. All I see is smoke. Nothing tangible and a net loss for those who are DOING the work.

BTW, you think AMC's don't work directly with the hospital? What planet do you live on?

By value do yo mean cheap labor?
 
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sevoflurane

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Goodnight, if this isn't a shill for an AMC.

One last piece to think on: If the AMC doesn't honor their agreement/contract with you and deliver everything promised, what are you going to do? Sue them? Your legal costs and time lost away from work and earning will probably result in net loss.

I'm sure the AMC can afford more a/o better lawyers than yourself... and in the end what will you win? The right to work for them some more? Do you really think you'll get damages? I'm sure they'll tie you up in court "forever."

Don't get in bed with the devil. You're not gonna win.

Furthermore, they can damage and libel your reputation. What will you do when you're looking for another job? Sue them to "fix" your professional reputation? This happens all the time in the "business world." If you don't have greater or equal resources to fight your prior employer, you're just going to cut your losses, lick your wounds and move on.

Move before that happens, and they've had a chance to use you.
Good post and I agree 100%. You sign up into one of these "AMC's" and you've sold yourself to the devil. :thumbup:
 

sevoflurane

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Dr. D, you have more experience than I do, and I hear you. The mid 90's was a bit rough for us as a profession. Now days, I don't see their utility and I hope that AMC's don't become another problem. We need to approach this issue early. Otherwise, we will see yet another wound festering and getting ready to go systemic.
 

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Can anyone help me out as far as after an AMC takes over how they're not undercut by a better-organized, more motivated all-MD or ACT group? I understand why they get the contracts that they do. I just don't understand why after a few years the hospitals wouldn't be open to renegotiation/accepting new contract bids? If what everyone here says is true, which is that these AMCs are extremely expensive and support the salaries of people who only do admin work, it seems like it'd be fairly easy to get them out.
 
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Mindy,
I understand your concern. I am familiar with Somnia and their models and work ethic. They are very unorganized, unethical and their C-level team is extremely closed minded. They have been in some financial trouble for some time and have let go a lot of the office staff to save them money, they then outsource the rest to India. Obviously, outsourcing everything to India is not the answer.
The CEO, Marc Koch, MD, treats his staff like they are dirt.
The business development department works hard, but has direction coming from the CAO, Marina Ring, who is unfamiliar with the Anesthesia industry, let alone, healthcare. Her background is in banking and she just came into this new role about a year ago. She does not understand healthcare or anesthesia and is making terrible decisions which falls back on the BD team.
The recruiting department consists of 2-3 recruiters, with one who is not actively recruiting due to doing the CAO's dirty work. Unfortunately without a great applicant tracking system, the recruiting department does not have the tools and the knowledge to do a full - cycle recruitment and recruit qualified candidates. Once a candidate is in the pipeline, the recruitment department has a tough time following up and keep the candidate in line due to the slow clinical affairs department and the C-level executives making decisions. Ultimately, they end up losing qualified candidates.
There have been a ton of complaints and the company does not know how to run a business. They have been asking random investment groups for money because they are losing money on various hospital accounts that are not making profits.
Somnia does not have a great reputation and if the C-level executive team keeps to what they are doing, then they will not be successful and have a poor reputation (which is what has happened).
 

topflight

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Jul 19, 2010
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Mindy,
I understand your concern. I am familiar with Somnia and their models and work ethic. They are very unorganized, unethical and their C-level team is extremely closed minded. They have been in some financial trouble for some time and have let go a lot of the office staff to save them money, they then outsource the rest to India. Obviously, outsourcing everything to India is not the answer.
The CEO, Marc Koch, MD, treats his staff like they are dirt.
The business development department works hard, but has direction coming from the CAO, Marina Ring, who is unfamiliar with the Anesthesia industry, let alone, healthcare. Her background is in banking and she just came into this new role about a year ago. She does not understand healthcare or anesthesia and is making terrible decisions which falls back on the BD team.
The recruiting department consists of 2-3 recruiters, with one who is not actively recruiting due to doing the CAO's dirty work. Unfortunately without a great applicant tracking system, the recruiting department does not have the tools and the knowledge to do a full - cycle recruitment and recruit qualified candidates. Once a candidate is in the pipeline, the recruitment department has a tough time following up and keep the candidate in line due to the slow clinical affairs department and the C-level executives making decisions. Ultimately, they end up losing qualified candidates.
There have been a ton of complaints and the company does not know how to run a business. They have been asking random investment groups for money because they are losing money on various hospital accounts that are not making profits.
Somnia does not have a great reputation and if the C-level executive team keeps to what they are doing, then they will not be successful and have a poor reputation (which is what has happened).
how do you know all this? I am not a big fan of somnia by any stretch of the imagination but i have talked with them in the past and they seem they were well put together. THey are really not the greataest in terms of call backs thats for sure. They have a girl danielle who never returns calls. un believable. But they still have MDS doing there own cases which is interesting considering it costs more.
 
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Mindy325

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Nov 2, 2010
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I guess the question is: Is this the wave of the future and all resistance is futile?

It may be the case that wherever I go, this type of system will eventually come there, because people are cutting costs everywhere.

It just seemed to me that the hospital was just focusing on the anesthesia department to balance their budget. I don't think they're going after radiology or any other department by bringing in an outside group.
 

TecmoBowl

10+ Year Member
Nov 22, 2007
86
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Attending Physician
Someone goes postal.

Does the CEO from Somnia have a personal bodyguard? Does the guy from Sheridan?
Do the Hospital CEOS?

I don't think so and believe me, someone will go nutz at some point and all new attention will be brought to such issues.

Btw, not intended as a threat here, just a point I'm sure is not lost on the people who actively displace other Doctors/families.

When pride etc. is stake, a lot of bad things can happen. When a Doctor who's spent more than 25% of his/her life in training etc., burdened with debt and all the other sacrifices, and their very livelihood is taken away- imagine the mental stress.

Somebody, somewhere, someday WILL snap.

Resistance is sometimes futile. Sometimes not. No specialty is immune to the economic pressures that medicine is facing. Some are more vulnerable than others. Compared to other specialties and other careers anesthesia is still good. But the trend is down. For some it will be a slow grind down. For others one day you go to work and find that your "secure" position is gone. That you will be able to stay and work harder for less, with new people to answer to. Maybe now interchangeable with a CRNA. Don't like it...fine...Leave. Just remember that you have a noncompete and may have to leave the community, sell your house, and relocate your family. The new normal.
 
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Mindy325

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I think the whole thing is disgusting. I was thinking the other day that if worse comes to worse I could sell one of my kidneys. :( I know there's no way I'd be able to sell my house in this market if I had to move. I probably should have gone into pain, but wasn't interested at the time. By now I could have had my own pain practice. Yeah yeah I know, the grass is always greener on the other side.
 

maceo

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Apr 1, 2008
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I think the whole thing is disgusting. I was thinking the other day that if worse comes to worse I could sell one of my kidneys. :( I know there's no way I'd be able to sell my house in this market if I had to move. I probably should have gone into pain, but wasn't interested at the time. By now I could have had my own pain practice. Yeah yeah I know, the grass is always greener on the other side.
I feel ya mindy. I should have gone into ER, Hospitalist medicine or ICU. Then i could find a job anywhere.. Everyone is looking for a hospitalist. Anesthesia is getting tight. really tight. and these management companies are making it worse.
 
Jan 25, 2015
4
1
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Attending Physician
Hi guys,

I'm new here. I just found the forum a few days ago. Is anyone familiar with Somnia?

They are taking over my trauma hospital and want to do all cases, not just endoscopy like at other hospitals.

Does anyone have any idea what the setup would be like?

What is it like to work for them?

Their website is fairly vague. Do they compensate their workers adequately?

What should I watch out for?

Thanks in advance.
 
Jan 25, 2015
4
1
Status
Attending Physician
Just look at the openings they have had ongoing in places unfilled for years. The current hospital my spouse works for they have failed to maintain adequate or contractually binding staffing. Anesthesiologists currently staffed have been asked(forced to work back to back 24 hour call days for weeks unending). This has been going on for over three months. They have been either unwilling or unable to staff other hospitals in the state and neighboring states that they are under contract to manage. They even had the balls to ask my spouse to work at other Somnia Hospitals that they don't have adequate staffing for during upcoming vacation time(this while just completing three weeks of every other day 24 hour call-yes that is over 21 days of 24hour call then post call then 24 hour call. IF YOU ARE A HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATOR DONT WORK WITH THIS COMPANY UNLESS YOU JUST HAVE NO INTENTION OF BEING A QUALITY HEALTH CARE FACILITY AND WANT CHAOS. This would be fine if they intended to support their employees with plans to fully staff in the future - just check out Palm Springs, El Paso, Las Cruces, Farmington and other locations - ongoing failure to staff adequately - listings continuously on gaswork etc., This isn't the only problem...they also want anesthesiologist to do cases that certain facilities don't have adequate facilities or staffing for such as Cardiac or Pediatric cases that should be done elsewhere for patient safety( I read somewhere that a certain Somnia Exec was sanctioned in the past for such dangers to patient safety, apparently hasn't learned lesson now pushes others to do dirty work). You might say, "wow the overtime would be financially a gain......Somnia is now complaining and lobbying for less pay during these overtime situations- they want it both ways understaff for less money out of their pocket and don't want to pay existing staff for working to cover their incompetence or unwillingness to live up to contractual obligations . Just Tell Somnia NO, run away....or better yet have a contract that has a financial penalty for each day they don't have adequate staffing or record every conversation and keep every communication where your asked to lessen your values and commitment to patient safety.