Leaving podiatry for MD/DO

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Jaydog2424

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I’m having a bad case of grass is greener syndrome.

Im 24- 3rd year pod student

Podiatry, unlike many other medical specialties, has no real average salary. So you don’t know if you’ll be making 80K or 1M a year. It’s up to luck in many ways? Anyway I’m in 24 YO and in my 3rd year. Already passed boards that only had a 76% pass rate this year, got through all the tough classes ( which BTW were 90% the same classes with the same professors as our MD school) so they drove me into insanity, but I passed them all. I chose podiatry because I was scared of the potential to not match into orthopedics after 4 grueling years of med school. So I went the safe route of guaranteeing myself surgery and will be doing many of the same things an FA- orthopedist would do. Everyone assumes I couldn’t get into med school. But I actually graduated with a 3.85 GPA and about 50th percentile MCAT, good enough for many DO schools. I’m about to start a 3 year residency next year and am having some second thoughts when I hear about some people in the field making under 200K for the rest of their life. This seems so low given the work put in. I’m up at night every night til 4 am wondering if I should just apply to DO schools and switch after graduating podiatry in a year so I don’t lose my progress. This way I’ll have infinite possibilites. I like the field honestly but get scared of being “ locked in “ What do you guys think?
 
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Weirdy

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I’m having a bad case of grass is greener syndrome.

Im 24- 3rd year pod student

I’m about to start a 3 year residency next year
You aren't starting residency next year. You are doing clerkships next year. Big difference. if you've started clerkships already, you've only seen 10% of the responsibility you will need to carry working side by side with residents. When you start, it is a significantly bigger difference than what you see. Don't under estimate it.

I’m up at night every night til 4 am wondering if I should just apply to DO schools and switch after graduating podiatry in a year so I don’t lose my progress.

What do you mean "don't lose my progress" ? You realize credits don't transfer that easily? You will still have to study for Step 1 and 2. You will still have to be hypercompetitive for an ortho specialty. You will still have to work your ass off (or harder really) than you are currently doing.
This way I’ll have infinite possibilites.
Infinite possibilities for what? Family medicine? Your specialty will be highly dependent on your Step score. Perhaps your grass is greener or FOMO mentality is downplaying how difficult it is to match into a competitive specialty. a 3.85gpa and 50% MCAT is very solid for DO applications. It is NOT the same for matching into competitive specialties- again, you may be downplaying how hard it is to get into a competitive specialty.

My personal advice for you:
- do not knock or downplay how easy a DPM residency will be
- do not underestimate how easy starting over, doing well on your Step 1 +2, and matching into Ortho will be


If you are agonizing over this decision and have unlimited funds to spare- by all means I encourage you to stop pursuing the DPM degree RIGHT NOW and start over. Update us after you get in. Update us when you get your Step scores back. Update us when you end up matching into xyz specialty (I doubt you will actually do this- prove me wrong.) If you are happier doing medicine and do not want to be locked into foot and ankle- switch right now and don't look back. But switching does NOT guarantee you will end up on the upside in terms of matching into a better specialty such as ortho. It may be much much easier to deal a better paying contract as FM/IM with much more job opportunities geographically, but the workload will be the same.
 
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Jaydog2424

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You aren't starting residency next year. You are doing clerkships next year. Big difference. if you've started clerkships already, you've only seen 10% of the responsibility you will need to carry working side by side with residents. When you start, it is a significantly bigger difference than what you see. Don't under estimate it.



What do you mean "don't lose my progress" ? You realize credits don't transfer that easily? You will still have to study for Step 1 and 2. You will still have to be hypercompetitive for an ortho specialty. You will still have to work your ass off (or harder really) than you are currently doing.

Infinite possibilities for what? Family medicine? Your specialty will be highly dependent on your Step score. Perhaps your grass is greener or FOMO mentality is downplaying how difficult it is to match into a competitive specialty. a 3.85gpa and 50% MCAT is very solid for DO applications. It is NOT the same for matching into competitive specialties- again, you may be downplaying how hard it is to get into a competitive specialty.

My personal advice for you:
- do not knock or downplay how easy a DPM residency will be
- do not underestimate how easy starting over, doing well on your Step 1 +2, and matching into Ortho will be


If you are agonizing over this decision and have unlimited funds to spare- by all means I encourage you to stop pursuing the DPM degree RIGHT NOW and start over. Update us after you get in. Update us when you get your Step scores back. Update us when you end up matching into xyz specialty (I doubt you will actually do this- prove me wrong.) If you are happier doing medicine and do not want to be locked into foot and ankle- switch right now and don't look back. But switching does NOT guarantee you will end up on the upside in terms of matching into a better specialty such as ortho. It may be much much easier to deal a better paying contract as FM/IM with much more job opportunities geographically, but the workload will be the same.
I appreciate your reply and you make great points. I’m not trying to be that guy but it’s 2022 and I graduate in 2023, so I would be doing residency next year… I was more so at this point looking into matching anesthesia recognizing how hyper competitive ortho is. Especially since anesthesia is DO friendly. I am currently applying to a few DO’s right now. I’m at their average age to apply so I don’t feel super behind.
 
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Jaydog2424

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You aren't starting residency next year. You are doing clerkships next year. Big difference. if you've started clerkships already, you've only seen 10% of the responsibility you will need to carry working side by side with residents. When you start, it is a significantly bigger difference than what you see. Don't under estimate it.



What do you mean "don't lose my progress" ? You realize credits don't transfer that easily? You will still have to study for Step 1 and 2. You will still have to be hypercompetitive for an ortho specialty. You will still have to work your ass off (or harder really) than you are currently doing.

Infinite possibilities for what? Family medicine? Your specialty will be highly dependent on your Step score. Perhaps your grass is greener or FOMO mentality is downplaying how difficult it is to match into a competitive specialty. a 3.85gpa and 50% MCAT is very solid for DO applications. It is NOT the same for matching into competitive specialties- again, you may be downplaying how hard it is to get into a competitive specialty.

My personal advice for you:
- do not knock or downplay how easy a DPM residency will be
- do not underestimate how easy starting over, doing well on your Step 1 +2, and matching into Ortho will be


If you are agonizing over this decision and have unlimited funds to spare- by all means I encourage you to stop pursuing the DPM degree RIGHT NOW and start over. Update us after you get in. Update us when you get your Step scores back. Update us when you end up matching into xyz specialty (I doubt you will actually do this- prove me wrong.) If you are happier doing medicine and do not want to be locked into foot and ankle- switch right now and don't look back. But switching does NOT guarantee you will end up on the upside in terms of matching into a better specialty such as ortho. It may be much much easier to deal a better paying contract as FM/IM with much more job opportunities geographically, but the workload will be the same.
I also know that podiatry school Has been very difficult and residency will be as well. That’s why I am thinking, if it’s long hours just like DO school, where is the solid lifestyle ( at least in terms of free hours) people have been talking about to get students to apply to podiatry school to begin with.
 

Weirdy

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I appreciate your reply and you make great points. I’m not trying to be that guy but it’s 2022 and I graduate in 2023, so I would be doing residency next year… I was more so at this point looking into matching anesthesia recognizing how hyper competitive ortho is. Especially since anesthesia is DO friendly. I am currently applying to a few DO’s right now. I’m at their average age to apply so I don’t feel super behind.
I see.

Look up NRMP numbers for DO match. 2021 it was 107/172 DOs matching into ortho. 62%. USMD was 699/934, 75%

For 2021 DO into anesthesia: 268/513, 52% match.

Decide carefully. DPM sucks for job opportunities and unfair contracts. If you think you have a better shot in DO, stop DPM now and apply.
 
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iridocyclitiss

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With you going into your fourth year your MCAT score is probably expired (it expires 3 years after you take it) and you'll need to take it again. That is a ton of time to invest in material you haven't touched in 3 years. Just because you got 50 percentile last time doesn't mean you'll get close to that again without some serious dedication and probably expensive test prep. Doesn't mean its impossible just annoying.

Second school of thought is the debt. If you choose to graduate in 2023 instead of quitting now. On one side that's an extra year of debt you're taking on for a profession you don't want to be in, not to mention the interest that will kick in May. IMO the debt you've already accrued in Pod school(with interest) + an expensive DO school debt will be substantial. You would have to be smart with your money and just spend as little as possible.

DO schools will absolutely evaluate your decision to leave school early and will probably evaluate your commitment to sticking to things. I would email DO schools and ask them what looks better. If I were you I would quit now and save yourself from the most expensive year of school.

Best of luck with your decision!
 

med2345

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76 percent pass rate? Where do you get the number from?
 

Jaydog2424

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76 percent pass rate? Where do you get the number from?
2021 had some of the worst APMLE part 1 pass rates in history. This number will be published soon but most schools have put out their numbers. Take a look
 

Jaydog2424

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With you going into your fourth year your MCAT score is probably expired (it expires 3 years after you take it) and you'll need to take it again. That is a ton of time to invest in material you haven't touched in 3 years. Just because you got 50 percentile last time doesn't mean you'll get close to that again without some serious dedication and probably expensive test prep. Doesn't mean its impossible just annoying.

Second school of thought is the debt. If you choose to graduate in 2023 instead of quitting now. On one side that's an extra year of debt you're taking on for a profession you don't want to be in, not to mention the interest that will kick in May. IMO the debt you've already accrued in Pod school(with interest) + an expensive DO school debt will be substantial. You would have to be smart with your money and just spend as little as possible.

DO schools will absolutely evaluate your decision to leave school early and will probably evaluate your commitment to sticking to things. I would email DO schools and ask them what looks better. If I were you I would quit now and save yourself from the most expensive year of school.

Best of luck with your decision!
I recognize this. My last MCAT is not expired but will expire if I stay the 4th year and I will need to take it again in may ( right before extnerships) leaving me 3
Months to study as much as I can. There is very little to lose taking it at that point. I think DO schools would appreciate having finished another school. I’m also of the mindset that since all my loans are federal, I will be paying the same 10% of my income to it regardless of where the number is. I have my own philosophy for doing that. My current thoughts are to see what happens to any DO schools that will still take my app and valid MCAT ( only a few are still open ) and then take MCAT in may and apply everywhere early next year to begin right after podiatry graduation. At this point, having the degree will leave me a safety valve.
 

Jaydog2424

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I see.

Look up NRMP numbers for DO match. 2021 it was 107/172 DOs matching into ortho. 62%. USMD was 699/934, 75%

For 2021 DO into anesthesia: 268/513, 52% match.

Decide carefully. DPM sucks for job opportunities and unfair contracts. If you think you have a better shot in DO, stop DPM now and apply.
Couldn’t this just be because they ranked anesthesia low on their list? If you look at that number then family practice DO’s matched 1440 out of 1912 on that list… that’s 75%… family practice is obviously not competitive so I don’t think that number tells the whole story but I see your point. I wish they had a number on there for the percentage that matched their preferred speciality in each because many people apply to multiple specialties
 
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med2345

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2021 had some of the worst APMLE part 1 pass rates in history. This number will be published soon but most schools have put out their numbers. Take a look
Ah I misread I thought you meant this years Part 2.. knew that but it not necessary a bad thing . Honestly think it’s so they don’t repeat history and set the bell curve up so it consistent with residency spots now that there is a surplus. No profession is perfect. MD DO has issues. Not to mention if you want to do surgery that route you’re more than likely looking at 5+ years of residency instead of 3. MGMA is over 200 for pods. I think the job market isn’t the greatest post Covid but it’s not as bad as the negativity here. Every resident grad the past 2 years I know has found a job and if not a fellow they chose. Regardless the argument, it’s your choice but the grass is ALWAYS greener.
 
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wakaflocka88

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I don’t disagree with OP - the job market for pods truly suck. As I’ve posted before, I’m very fortunate to be in a good position but I had to work for it. The reality is the majority of graduating pods will be stuck in a run of the mill PP pod job with terrible pay. These lucrative jobs are rare, period and rarer in a desirable metro city unless you go rural like AirBud and dtrack.

Go with your feelings and see how DO plays out. Even if you do FM/IM the pay is respectable and those jobs are available everywhere.
 
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de Ribas

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I’m having a bad case of grass is greener syndrome.

Im 24- 3rd year pod student

Podiatry, unlike many other medical specialties, has no real average salary. So you don’t know if you’ll be making 80K or 1M a year. It’s up to luck in many ways? Anyway I’m in 24 YO and in my 3rd year. Already passed boards that only had a 76% pass rate this year, got through all the tough classes ( which BTW were 90% the same classes with the same professors as our MD school) so they drove me into insanity, but I passed them all. I chose podiatry because I was scared of the potential to not match into orthopedics after 4 grueling years of med school. So I went the safe route of guaranteeing myself surgery and will be doing many of the same things an FA- orthopedist would do. Everyone assumes I couldn’t get into med school. But I actually graduated with a 3.85 GPA and about 50th percentile MCAT, good enough for many DO schools. I’m about to start a 3 year residency next year and am having some second thoughts when I hear about some people in the field making under 200K for the rest of their life. This seems so low given the work put in. I’m up at night every night til 4 am wondering if I should just apply to DO schools and switch after graduating podiatry in a year so I don’t lose my progress. This way I’ll have infinite possibilites. I like the field honestly but get scared of being “ locked in “ What do you guys think?
If you are so frustrated with podiatry now, I would suggest you try DO. You have nothing to lose by taking MCAT. It appears that you dislike podiatry pathway. You are 24. You don't want to invest more money and time into something you actively dislike.
Would you get into ortho easily by switching to DO? absolutely not. It seems like you are trying to tell yourself that since you passed pod courses and passed APMLE part 1, you can excell at DO and get into ortho. Not even close. Passing part 1 and doing exceptionally well on USMLE are not even close. In DO school, on top of doing well in classes, you will have to constantly studying for USMLE/COMLEX, you will have to do more tasks, like OMM, etc.
Of course you can try ortho, or any other specialty once you are at DO school. You have to be ready to settle for IM, FM, etc if you go to DO. Ortho is not guaranteed.

It is not wrong to desire higher income, but you haven't stated other reasons besides income why you want to be ortho. Money is great, but like any specialty, you have to like it to some extent. It takes hard work, time and money to become ortho. And ortho attendings, generally, work harder and longer hrs for their money.
 
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Weirdy

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If you are aiming for ortho, you will need top grades, notable research, and connections. Even with a perfect resume, you may not match due to number of slots available. This is not accounting for school recognition with established connections vs being at a smaller program.

Not saying its impossible, but much harder than landing FM/IM etc.
 
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Jaydog2424

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If you are so frustrated with podiatry now, I would suggest you try DO. You have e nothing to lose by taking MCAT. It appears that you dislike podiatry parhway. You are 24. You don't want to invest more money and time into something you actively dislike.
Would you get into ortho easily by switching to DO, absolutely not. It seems like you are trying to tell yourself that since you passed pod courses and passed APMLE part 1, you can excell at DO and get intonortho. Not even close. Passing part 1 and doing exceptionally well on USMLE are not even close. In DO school, on top of doing well in classes, constantly studying for USMLE/COMLEX, you will have to do more, like OMM, etc.
Of course you can try ortho, or any other specialty once you are at DO school. You have to be ready to settle for IM, FM, etc if you go to DO. Ortho is not guaranteed.

It is not wrong to desire higher income, but you haven't stated other reasons besides income why you want to be ortho. Money is great, but like any specialty, you have to like it to some extent. It takes hard work, time and money to become ortho. And ortho attendings, generally, work harder and longer hrs for their money.
I’m not dead set on ortho at all. Far from it. I actually thought I would hate FM and internal when I was entering pod ( kind of why I did it )but seems very intriguing. And As I said I was moreso looking into that and anesthesia , both of which are not competitive to match into. It’s not about making a ton of money for me. But wow making 120K-150K in podiatry, and even making a bit more if you want to put in many hours, just to be crapped on by other types of doctors who work the same or less to earn much more is crap. I know I wouldn’t likely be a top student at a med school. Totally acknowledge that. I just see the career options they have and the fact that you can choose AFTER rotating with these specialties for long periods of time as big benefits for someone young like me. I don’t hate podiatry, I actually think it’s cool, many are happy but there is very little comfort unlike many other fields of medicine.
 

Jaydog2424

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If you are aiming for ortho, you will need top grades, notable research, and connections. Even with a perfect resume, you may not match due to number of slots available. This is not accounting for school recognition with established connections vs being at a smaller program.

Not saying its impossible, but much harder than landing FM/IM etc.
Understood, I do think I would be very comfortable in many of the less competitive specialities in that financially and in terms of satisfaction. I appreciate that time to think about it too.
 
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de Ribas

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I’m not dead set on ortho at all. Far from it. I actually thought I would hate FM and internal but seems very intriguing. And As I said I was moreso looking into that and anesthesia , both of which are not competitive to match into. It’s not about making a ton of money for me. But wow making 120K-150K in podiatry, and even making a bit more if you want to put in many hours, just to be crapped on by other types of doctors who work the same or less to earn much more is crap. I know I wouldn’t likely be a top student at a med school. Totally acknowledge that. I just see the career options they have and the fact that you can choose AFTER rotating with these specialties for long periods of time as big benefits for someone young like me. I don’t hate podiatry, I actually think it’s cool, many are happy but there is very little comfort unlike many other fields of medicine.
If you are ok with FM, IM and other easier to get specialties like ER, Neuro, etc, then go ahead and try DO. Retake MCAT, apply and see where it gets you. Best
 

Jaydog2424

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If you are so frustrated with podiatry now, I would suggest you try DO. You have nothing to lose by taking MCAT. It appears that you dislike podiatry pathway. You are 24. You don't want to invest more money and time into something you actively dislike.
Would you get into ortho easily by switching to DO? absolutely not. It seems like you are trying to tell yourself that since you passed pod courses and passed APMLE part 1, you can excell at DO and get into ortho. Not even close. Passing part 1 and doing exceptionally well on USMLE are not even close. In DO school, on top of doing well in classes, you will have to constantly studying for USMLE/COMLEX, you will have to do more tasks, like OMM, etc.
Of course you can try ortho, or any other specialty once you are at DO school. You have to be ready to settle for IM, FM, etc if you go to DO. Ortho is not guaranteed.

It is not wrong to desire higher income, but you haven't stated other reasons besides income why you want to be ortho. Money is great, but like any specialty, you have to like it to some extent. It takes hard work, time and money to become ortho. And ortho attendings, generally, work harder and longer hrs for their money.
I don’t list passing APMLE to say I would kill the USMLE I said it to say I have gotten through the “weeding out” portion of podiatry and am sort of on auto pilot at this point.
 
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PTPuser

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Sounds like you made up your mind.
You have to drag me by my teeth for me to ever go back and start over as MS1.
 
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Jaydog2424

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Sounds like you made up your mind.
You have to drag me by my teeth for me to ever go back and start over as MS1.
I know it would suck. But I have to ask what would suck more, that, or having a major regret for 30+ years
 
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DexterMorganSK

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I know it would suck. But I have to ask what would suck more, that, or having a major regret for 30+ years

Before you do anything, reach out to your local DO programs and speak to an advisor. Going from one professional school to another is a red flag in itself. IMO, it is easier to explain to an AdCom why they switch before the 2nd year but, good luck, and I hope it works out for you.
 
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Jaydog2424

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Before you do anything, reach out to your local DO programs and speak to an advisor. Going from one professional school to another is a red flag in itself. IMO, it is easier to explain to an AdCom why they switch before the 2nd year but, good luck, and I hope it works out for you.
I don’t understand how it makes any difference when you switch. You decide you don’t want to do something and that you want to follow a dream. I’ve never heard of anyone knocking that.
 
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gyngyn

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I don’t understand how it makes any difference when you switch. You decide you don’t want to do something and that you want to follow a dream. I’ve never heard of anyone knocking that.
We would not interview someone who quit in the third year of podiatry school.
Other places may see things differently.
 
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Prehealth1011

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I’m not dead set on ortho at all. Far from it. I actually thought I would hate FM and internal when I was entering pod ( kind of why I did it )but seems very intriguing. And As I said I was moreso looking into that and anesthesia , both of which are not competitive to match into. It’s not about making a ton of money for me. But wow making 120K-150K in podiatry, and even making a bit more if you want to put in many hours, just to be crapped on by other types of doctors who work the same or less to earn much more is crap. I know I wouldn’t likely be a top student at a med school. Totally acknowledge that. I just see the career options they have and the fact that you can choose AFTER rotating with these specialties for long periods of time as big benefits for someone young like me. I don’t hate podiatry, I actually think it’s cool, many are happy but there is very little comfort unlike many other fields of medicine.
I'm a DO. I have classmates that went unmatched this cycle with 230s. Don't go by the old charting outcome numbers. Anesthesia isn't a "220 and I'll match" field anymore if you're a DO. It's not as DO-friendly as you think vs EM for example. Both anesthesia and radiology are stats-heavy specialties that like MDs and they're a common backup for many surgery/derm/optho applicants

FM/IM/Neuro/Peds/EM/PMR/Psyc are all reasonable. General surgery is competitive but achievable - my friends who matched did multiple auditions and none of them were 240 guys. Ortho/Optho/Derm is out for the most part

Good luck in whatever you decide
 
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deleted1097413

if you want to drop out just don't do medicine at all. all specialties bitch. medicine in general is starting to suck.
 
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call1800doctorb

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I personally think you should finish your DPM first, I think it’ll hurt your chances with DO schools if you drop out in the middle. I may be wrong though.

I don’t know if the grass will be greener, I think all areas of medicine probably suck. I regret my decision to go into health care.
 
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DexterMorganSK

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I don’t understand how it makes any difference when you switch. You decide you don’t want to do something and that you want to follow a dream. I’ve never heard of anyone knocking that.

It makes a difference when an applicant switches fields. I know of 2 students that left a Pod program after part 1, re-took the MCAT, and started at a DO program all over again. In addition, as gyngyn said above, If you go for the DO route and make it to the interview stage, some of the questions coming at you will be:

"if becoming a Podiatrist wasn't something you wanted, why did you apply to it? Why did you decide to change your career during your junior year?
If we give you a seat at our program (DO/MD), what guarantee is there that you will not switch fields again?"


Something to think about!
 
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PTPuser

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You invest in school and the school is also investing in you. Attrition rate for whatever reason is a loosing game for both parties and at the end of the day the school is looking out for themselves (YMMV with this). But like gyngyn said, most won't accept you because you're a financial risk, I'm sure there's more reasons but that's the most obvious one. Loosing students means loosing money. Who the hell wants to loose money and their investments?
 
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Jaydog2424

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We would not interview someone who quit in the third year of podiatry school.
Other places may see things differently.
Would you interview someone who graduated podiatry school, then decided to advance their career after? Or is this one in the same.
 

Jaydog2424

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You invest in school and the school is also investing in you. Attrition rate for whatever reason is a loosing game for both parties and at the end of the day the school is looking out for themselves (YMMV with this). But like gyngyn said, most won't accept you because you're a financial risk, I'm sure there's more reasons but that's the most obvious one. Loosing students means loosing money. Who the hell wants to loose money and their investments?
See but I don’t understand how I would be a financial risk if I graduate from pod school first… it would show that I would stick out the schooling no matter what.
 

Jaydog2424

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It makes a difference when an applicant switches fields. I know of 2 students that left a Pod program after part 1, re-took the MCAT, and started at a DO program all over again. In addition, as gyngyn said above, If you go for the DO route and make it to the interview stage, some of the questions coming at you will be:

"if becoming a Podiatrist wasn't something you wanted, why did you apply to it? Why did you decide to change your career during your junior year?
If we give you a seat at our program (DO/MD), what guarantee is there that you will not switch fields again?"


Something to think about!
I have definitely thought about this. Again do you think it would help the look of that if a graduate first or wouldn’t matter. Also were your friends able to get into school easily or was it hard for them? I would love to contact someone who has been through what I am thinking about to give direct advice like that :( sadly hard to come by.
 

Jaydog2424

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if you want to drop out just don't do medicine at all. all specialties bitch. medicine in general is starting to suck.
Do you think if I have doubts about this I would definitely have doubts about all fields?
 
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Jaydog2424

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I personally think you should finish your DPM first, I think it’ll hurt your chances with DO schools if you drop out in the middle. I may be wrong though.

I don’t know if the grass will be greener, I think all areas of medicine probably suck. I regret my decision to go into health care.
This is what I was thinking and exactly what I’m on this forum to find out
 

Jaydog2424

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I'm a DO. I have classmates that went unmatched this cycle with 230s. Don't go by the old charting outcome numbers. Anesthesia isn't a "220 and I'll match" field anymore if you're a DO. It's not as DO-friendly as you think vs EM for example. Both anesthesia and radiology are stats-heavy specialties that like MDs and they're a common backup for many surgery/derm/optho applicants

FM/IM/Neuro/Peds/EM/PMR/Psyc are all reasonable. General surgery is competitive but achievable - my friends who matched did multiple auditions and none of them were 240 guys. Ortho/Optho/Derm is out for the most part

Good luck in whatever you decide
So would you say if I’m okay with the high possibility of those then it’s still a good choice?
 

gyngyn

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Would you interview someone who graduated podiatry school, then decided to advance their career after? Or is this one in the same.
A person who has worked in another field (law, nursing...) and made a thoughtful decision to apply to our school would get consideration. There are exceptions (e.g. naturopathy).
 
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call1800doctorb

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This is what I was thinking and exactly what I’m on this forum to find out
Graduating would only help your chances, quitting would only hurt your chances. Graduate then apply to DO schools.
 
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Weirdy

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Do you think if I have doubts about this I would definitely have doubts about all fields?
Yes. You have not rotated on off service as a full intern.

I am happy to be locked into foot and ankle with a combination of clinic and surgery.
I was miserable on internal medicine. I respect what they do, but I woke up every day hating life.
All of the surgery rotations were a night and day difference.

This does not mean being on service was all sunshine and rainbows- but it my worse weeks were still doable compared to a month of inpatient medicine.
 
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podiatryresident

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2021 had some of the worst APMLE part 1 pass rates in history. This number will be published soon but most schools have put out their numbers. Take a look
I'm a IMG who already took the USMLE1,2 and APMLE1,2. Be honest with you, passing the APMLE doesn't mean anything. USMLE is a very different story :|
 
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Jaydog2424

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I’m surprised no one here has bought up the NOVA Southeastern DPM to DO program thingy? Do they still do that? You apply to DO school during your first year of DPM residency and then the DO part is only 3 years I think..
That’d be ideal and you would think some opportunities like this would present at some of the schools like mine attached to and integrated with an MD or DO program.
 

Jaydog2424

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Yes. You have not rotated on off service as a full intern.

I am happy to be locked into foot and ankle with a combination of clinic and surgery.
I was miserable on internal medicine. I respect what they do, but I woke up every day hating life.
All of the surgery rotations were a night and day difference.

This does not mean being on service was all sunshine and rainbows- but it my worse weeks were still doable compared to a month of inpatient medicine.
I wish we could do these rotations while still in school. Would help me immensely right now.
 

Robin-jay

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What do you guys think?
For someone who cares a lot about being able to do surgery, and being able to make the financially best decisions, I'd have to say your desire to go to DO school after 3rd year of podiatry school or after graduation seems counterintuitive.
 
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PTPuser

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That’d be ideal and you would think some opportunities like this would present at some of the schools like mine attached to and integrated with an MD or DO program.

That program in NOVA is no longer a thing.
 
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Dral

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You speak of some of the less competitive specialties, but things like Peds and FM don't generally make a ton more than $200k. You may have a chance at a DO school, less so at MD. DO's have to work a lot harder to get spots in competitive fields like ortho, derm, surgery subs.

I feel your efforts are better spent finishing out podiatry and putting in extra time and effort into finding a position somewhere that will fit your career goals more. I'm at an academic center. I'm not sure how much our podiatrists are paid, but as far as I can tell, they don't really get disrespect from other specialties.

These are all jobs/careers for most of us. If medicine (med school) was your calling, you would have done whatever you could back in the day to go that route opposed to podiatry. I would predict that 30 years down the road, as long as you are in a position that fulfills your career goals (seems to be pay and prestige a bit...which is fine. I'm not knocking that), you won't really have regrets.
 
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Prehealth1011

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So would you say if I’m okay with the high possibility of those then it’s still a good choice?
It's a personal decision. If I already racked up considerable debt in Podiatry school and I'm almost done, I wouldn't go into DO schools aiming for primary care. Yeah the guaranteed 250k (more or less) is nice but doing two lengthy professional schools would be a big NO for me
 

air bud

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I’m having a bad case of grass is greener syndrome.

Im 24- 3rd year pod student

Podiatry, unlike many other medical specialties, has no real average salary. So you don’t know if you’ll be making 80K or 1M a year. It’s up to luck in many ways? Anyway I’m in 24 YO and in my 3rd year. Already passed boards that only had a 76% pass rate this year, got through all the tough classes ( which BTW were 90% the same classes with the same professors as our MD school) so they drove me into insanity, but I passed them all. I chose podiatry because I was scared of the potential to not match into orthopedics after 4 grueling years of med school. So I went the safe route of guaranteeing myself surgery and will be doing many of the same things an FA- orthopedist would do. Everyone assumes I couldn’t get into med school. But I actually graduated with a 3.85 GPA and about 50th percentile MCAT, good enough for many DO schools. I’m about to start a 3 year residency next year and am having some second thoughts when I hear about some people in the field making under 200K for the rest of their life. This seems so low given the work put in. I’m up at night every night til 4 am wondering if I should just apply to DO schools and switch after graduating podiatry in a year so I don’t lose my progress. This way I’ll have infinite possibilites. I like the field honestly but get scared of being “ locked in “ What do you guys think?
I could have done DO school, had the stats. I wanted to guarantee I could do surgery, and I thought I knew at the time that most DO got pushed into specialties that I didn't think I would be interested in. Looking back, I would have done DO and seen where the chips fell. Would have shot for surgery and been happy with EM so I could do shift work and travel. You are 24. Are student loans an issue? If not, quit and do DO. If yes, the idea of 500k is pretty daunting....
 
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I’m having a bad case of grass is greener syndrome.

Im 24- 3rd year pod student

Podiatry, unlike many other medical specialties, has no real average salary. So you don’t know if you’ll be making 80K or 1M a year. It’s up to luck in many ways? Anyway I’m in 24 YO and in my 3rd year. Already passed boards that only had a 76% pass rate this year, got through all the tough classes ( which BTW were 90% the same classes with the same professors as our MD school) so they drove me into insanity, but I passed them all. I chose podiatry because I was scared of the potential to not match into orthopedics after 4 grueling years of med school. So I went the safe route of guaranteeing myself surgery and will be doing many of the same things an FA- orthopedist would do. Everyone assumes I couldn’t get into med school. But I actually graduated with a 3.85 GPA and about 50th percentile MCAT, good enough for many DO schools. I’m about to start a 3 year residency next year and am having some second thoughts when I hear about some people in the field making under 200K for the rest of their life. This seems so low given the work put in. I’m up at night every night til 4 am wondering if I should just apply to DO schools and switch after graduating podiatry in a year so I don’t lose my progress. This way I’ll have infinite possibilites. I like the field honestly but get scared of being “ locked in “ What do you guys think?
If you are the type of guy who works hard and have a genuine desire to take care of your patients and willing to put in the work and sacrifices to do so (which sounds like you are), you'll do fine wherever you go man. The job market right now might not be great for brand new grads, you might not get the job with the income you're looking for right away, but after getting some experience under your belt, the podiatry job market is much easier and better
 
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Metamorphosis.DO

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I had a chiropractor who, every time he adjusted me, complained about how much he wishes he went to MD/DO. I don’t know why he went into chiro. It sounds like he doesn’t either. He did an internship with one during his undergrad after waning to do orthopedics for years. Anyway, he mentioned that he spoke to a medical school in the state where he works (DO school) and they said they would put him in at year 3 as long as he could concurrently take a couple courses with the first and second years to catch him up on OPP/procedures.
he ended up not doing it because he has a family and didn’t want to give up a “6 figure salary“ for more loans.

You are young. You have options. Do it. I would.

BTW— I am in no way comparing DPM with DCs. There is not comparison. I rolled my eyes yesterday when I drove by an office that said ‘Chiropractic Physician“ on it because there is no comparison whatsoever. DPMs have a very limited scope of practice anatomically but then again, they chose to limit themselves just as a FA MD/DO Ortho would. DPM will never get the prestige that MD/DO has. It won’t get the pay either because at the end of the day the training is less. But it is beyond respectable.

keep us updated.
 
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WhistleBrewer

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I wholeheartedly feel you OP. I am in my late 20s ad a third year and I regret my decision every day. If I could go back in time, I should've studied MCAT more and re-applied DO. Giving PA a chance then going to med school honestly wouldn't been bad choice as well.

Every day, Podiatry's scope of practice is narrowing while NP/PAs win grounds on expansion of their scope. Podiatry schools in general are losing current students because many are dissatisfied with the profession pushing parity so much that they are suffering taking MD level classes, learning the MCAT for APMLE, 4 year of grueling curriculum, and coming out with SUCH a LIMITED SCOPE and MEDICAL licensure. There's literally no satisfaction or excitement of graduating because you essentially are doing the jobs Primary Care and Orthopedists can do except they don't want to because it does not pay well nor respect.

The applicant pool is shrinking since 4 years ago with 16% decrease on the steady compared to the past. Podiatry is not popular. Many who wants to go into this profession either are following their parents foot steps or washed out MD/DO applicants. Very few are in love with podiatry...

Recent higher up strategic meetings is aiming to recruit middle school students as the primary target for Podiatry so in 10 years they can apply... I mean how dumb is that. Not undergards, high schools, but MIDDLE SCHOOL.

Lastly, with the USMLE and White Paper situation, it is projected that we will not have a chance to speak with the ACGME until 10 years tops.

In essence, the parity talks are futile and we will see the downward trend of the profession despite making Podiatry 4 years, mandatory residency for 3 years, and coming up with fellowships...

I wish I could easily transfer to DO because majority of materials we are learning is up to par with them, except we just cannot practice due to legislation and our profession being what it is.

It would be best for Podiatry to focus more on endocrinology, rheumatology, and family practice so we can be absorbed into primary care to tackel physician shortages... Hell, we should join the NP/PA in fight for expanded scope of practice so we can have that piece of bread as well

I'm sure Im gonna get lots of angry responses by Podiatry Loyalists and Feet breeders but the climate of being a Podiatry Student is WAY different than the current practioners so be weary my old dudes

/endrant
 
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