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LORs help

Discussion in 'Nontraditional Students' started by Scooby-Doo, Mar 12, 2007.

  1. Scooby-Doo

    Scooby-Doo Guest

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    I tried contacting my lab teacher in college but I found out that he isn't working at the university anymore. I would not want to ask my old pre-med adviser for a LOR only because he has favoritism over students. I was hoping if medical schools would accept LORs from volunteer coordinators or from a manager of where I work?
     
  2. Captain Fantastic

    Physician 10+ Year Member

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    Most schools would like to see LORs from two science professors under which you took a class. Some also like to see an LOR from a non-science professor, again from a class you took. Schools will often accept upto six LORs and encourage the other letters to be from physicians whom you shadowed, volunteer coordinators, managers from your work, PI's of the labs you did research in, etc.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Scooby-Doo

    Scooby-Doo Guest

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    To be honest with you, being the oldest of a big family, work, and volunteer, I didn't have the time to talk with my science professors. I am really afraid that because of my LORs I won't be accepted to any allopathic schools.
     
  4. Captain Fantastic

    Physician 10+ Year Member

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    If you're taking classes this semester it's not too late to develop a relationship with a prof or two. Talk to them before class, or just after class if you're too busy to go to office hours. Sit near the front so they see your smiling face every day.

    If you're not taking classes anymore you'll have to punt. Contact some of your former professors and talk with them. You can probably schedule a meeting with them to discuss what you need and answer any questions they have about your background, motivations, etc. At the end of the meeting ask if they feel they can write a supportive letter for you. Obviously not as nice as developing a relationship with the professor, but if those are the cards you're holding then that's the hand you play.
     
  5. mdadmit

    mdadmit Admissions Expert
    Vendor Advising Service 10+ Year Member

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    Scooby,

    In general, you should obtain one recommendation from a science teacher, humanities teacher, and extracurricular supervisor. In this way, you can prove your excellence in science, liberal arts, and non-academic endeavors. It’s all about showing your well-roundedness. Focus on obtaining recommendations from individuals who know you well as opposed to big-name professors you have never met. A glowing recommendation from your advanced biology teaching assistant whose office hours you visited weekly will be much stronger than a two-line recommendation from your dad’s famous researcher friend who you met once at the mall. Coaches, community service leaders, and employers. and principal investigators can make excellent recommenders.

    Some schools require two science recommendations. Check with each school for specific policies. Also, some schools do not count math as a science. The Texas schools can be particularly picky about such things. You may want to hunt down that old lab teacher even if he is no longer with the university. Also, you can ask former science TAs who may have known you well. The science rec doesn't have to be from a big name prof. If it comes down to it, perhaps you could schmooze that old pre-med advisor and become one of his favorites! I ended up obtaining a physics professor rec right at the end of the class and a biology TA rec. I also submitted one from my basketball coach, research advisor, and a humanities prof. It worked out well - I got into Harvard.

    Let me know if you have any further questions.

    MDAdmit
     
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  6. OP
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    Scooby-Doo

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    how about a letter of rec from an english teacher?
     
  7. neurorat

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    As mentioned in the above posts, it depends on where you are applying. I think that an English professor rec is good for one letter, but you will still need some from science faculty.

    I also did not have a good relationship with any science professors when I was applying. I spoke with some of the schools about this, and all of them said that this is often times a requirement for accreditation and that they will keep in mind that your other letters are from people who know you better. I ended up getting one from my physics professor and one from my neuroanatomy professor, but my "real" letters were from a physician, a research advisor, and my advisor for my clinical internship.

    I didn't get into Harvard :) but I was admitted to several of my state schools.

    Good luck!
     
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