Low Comlex no USMLE, was wondering if people with similar stats years prior had recs for specific programs for me to apply to...

change4med

5+ Year Member
Jul 8, 2014
140
64
Status
Medical Student
Hey ya'll, it's been a while! Surprised I got this far tbh!

Comlex 1: 490
Comlex 2: 492
PE: First try pass
Bottom 1/3rd
Some research experience and abstract/journal pubs prior to medical school
Some leadership/volunteer/work things but nothing major
No red flags, pass in most things, HP in family and psych. Generally pretty nice comments about me being cheerful/working hard/needing to be a little more confident.


I wanted to do IM since I really enjoyed inpatient medicine, don't think I want to specialize in anything, not objecting to family medicine either but I only have all my letters for IM in so still kind of stressed about that (my last family letter writer kind of ghosted me). If anyone had similarly low stats from last year or a few years ago and would be willing to tell me some places where they applied and got an interview from I would really appreciate it.. I remember Freida showed Comlex ranges last year but they revamped the site and that no longer shows. I don't mind any rural areas, I'd prefer suburban/urban but I know beggers can't be choosers. I'm a little nervous about east coast IM programs since I've heard stories of it being really malignant so if anyone could share any spots they think wasn't too bad I'd really appreciate it too..

I have 2 auditions currently, but I honestly can't tell if they liked me enough to go to the PD and go 'ignore his score, we want him.' I think I get along well with everyone, offer to do PE checks/scut/consult calls, student soap/progress/DC notes etc but idk I just don't know how to really stand out beyond just staying upbeat and trying to not get in their way. Any feedback on what you felt made you stand out during your auditions I'd appreciate it as well!

But again, thanks for any advice I can get! So excited to move on! :)

If this is the wrong place to ask please let me know where to post and I'll move on over there! It's been so long since I've used SDN!
 

libertyyne

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Mar 5, 2015
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Chances are decent if you apply to the right programs.
 

calvinhobbes

Physician
10+ Year Member
May 24, 2006
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You’ll be fine for FM or IM! Just apply broadly and early and rank every program.
 
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Spectreman

2+ Year Member
May 9, 2016
614
1,004
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Medical Student (Accepted)
I feel like the entire original post could be summarized as “I’m lazy and unexceptional and trying to do the bare minimum to score internal medicine LOL”. Yes you could probably match to any number of mediocre IM residencies with your “credentials”.
... Gracious sakes alive
 
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AlteredScale

Staff member
Administrator
7+ Year Member
May 10, 2013
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I'm on the last week of my last sub-i. Some advice based on my experiences:

-Make sure you get a feel for the attending expectations for Sub-I's as well as the residents. there's a fine line between being a helpful sub-i and being overbearing. ASK them ahead of time.

-You need to follow up with your residents after rounds to see what they need help with. Phone calls are a time eater so I try and offer to do those first. Orders are easy to put into the computer so the need to do that is small.

-Obviously take control of your assigned patients, if you have a smaller number of patients you better know just about everything about them. Try knowing this stuff mentally vs printing out all their stuff.

-BE ORGANIZED. It's very hard to learn or perfect this as a sub-I honestly as everyone has a different system. But when you print out the list, you need have a good systematic way of going through the information to be as efficient as possible. For me that means having a purpose for where I am writing things (my AM info is on the right on the empty box on my list, my to-do is on the left with check boxes next to them. I draw a line below this check list and put PM updates below). Some use different colored pens to help with this.

-Admit presentations: it was expected at this point that you know how to do an H&P fairly well and present them in an organized format. For presentations I really tried to tailor what I was presenting to be pertinent to the problem (AKA not talking about their tonsillectomy when they are coming in for heart failure exacerbation). Start thinking through why you would need a diagnostic lab or imaging and what you would do with those results (AKA would it change your plan). Also started thinking about admit planning such as diet, nursing, tele, fluid management, DVT prophylaxis, O2 supplementation.

-Admit problem list/med rec list: this was a little helpful tool from a fellow. To get a sense of a patients active problem list go through their at home med rec list on admission, run through those meds and ask yourself "what is this med used for" and start mentally creating a list of problems. Then when you are with the patient review the meds with them and make sure you ask if they are taking it, WHY they are taking it, if the dosing has changed recently, etc.

-Progress Notes: most attendings I have had this month expect them to be done before rounds, so while you are going through the computer you should be creating your progress note and adjusting the plan (again thinking through why would want some tests, does the patient NEED a daily CBC or BMP?) You should have it set up and pended so all you have to do is 24-hour events and physical exam after you see the patient.

-During rounds you should be listening in on what is going on about every patient. For your patients you should know exactly what the plan is and be ready to follow up in the PM and report any updates. You should ask your resident team if it is okay that you put in the orders for the patients assigned to you as it does give you a bit more responsibility. Make sure to see if things are moving (has the RBC been transfused yet? has PT seen a patient you are hoping to DC yet?). If that means calling down to the floors to ask around then do so.

-Once you feel more comfortable start creating check lists on more patients as practice but don't go around trying to take charge of them especially if another student is seeing them. Just start creating these to-do checklists and thinking about how you would go about approaching the increased work load as an actual intern.

-It's also good to help the third year students if you have any (shows that you have a passion for teaching a bit). Make sure they feel comfortable getting the information and help them with presenting in a systematic and organized way. It's distasteful to pimp the third years in any way, shape, or form as you're only a sub-i, but I've seen it happen (during rounds!) and it's pretty awkward. I usually just tell them the information or share resources with them vs ask them in question format. After rounds I like to just encourage them and give them a little feedback on their presentation, just be nice about it. Remember, you're still a student but want to start leading a little bit.
 

Spectreman

2+ Year Member
May 9, 2016
614
1,004
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
I'm on the last week of my last sub-i. Some advice based on my experiences:

-Make sure you get a feel for the attending expectations for Sub-I's as well as the residents. there's a fine line between being a helpful sub-i and being overbearing. ASK them ahead of time.

-You need to follow up with your residents after rounds to see what they need help with. Phone calls are a time eater so I try and offer to do those first. Orders are easy to put into the computer so the need to do that is small.

-Obviously take control of your assigned patients, if you have a smaller number of patients you better know just about everything about them. Try knowing this stuff mentally vs printing out all their stuff.

-BE ORGANIZED. It's very hard to learn or perfect this as a sub-I honestly as everyone has a different system. But when you print out the list, you need have a good systematic way of going through the information to be as efficient as possible. For me that means having a purpose for where I am writing things (my AM info is on the right on the empty box on my list, my to-do is on the left with check boxes next to them. I draw a line below this check list and put PM updates below). Some use different colored pens to help with this.

-Admit presentations: it was expected at this point that you know how to do an H&P fairly well and present them in an organized format. For presentations I really tried to tailor what I was presenting to be pertinent to the problem (AKA not talking about their tonsillectomy when they are coming in for heart failure exacerbation). Start thinking through why you would need a diagnostic lab or imaging and what you would do with those results (AKA would it change your plan). Also started thinking about admit planning such as diet, nursing, tele, fluid management, DVT prophylaxis, O2 supplementation.

-Admit problem list/med rec list: this was a little helpful tool from a fellow. To get a sense of a patients active problem list go through their at home med rec list on admission, run through those meds and ask yourself "what is this med used for" and start mentally creating a list of problems. Then when you are with the patient review the meds with them and make sure you ask if they are taking it, WHY they are taking it, if the dosing has changed recently, etc.

-Progress Notes: most attendings I have had this month expect them to be done before rounds, so while you are going through the computer you should be creating your progress note and adjusting the plan (again thinking through why would want some tests, does the patient NEED a daily CBC or BMP?) You should have it set up and pended so all you have to do is 24-hour events and physical exam after you see the patient.

-During rounds you should be listening in on what is going on about every patient. For your patients you should know exactly what the plan is and be ready to follow up in the PM and report any updates. You should ask your resident team if it is okay that you put in the orders for the patients assigned to you as it does give you a bit more responsibility. Make sure to see if things are moving (has the RBC been transfused yet? has PT seen a patient you are hoping to DC yet?). If that means calling down to the floors to ask around then do so.

-Once you feel more comfortable start creating check lists on more patients as practice but don't go around trying to take charge of them especially if another student is seeing them. Just start creating these to-do checklists and thinking about how you would go about approaching the increased work load as an actual intern.

-It's also good to help the third year students if you have any (shows that you have a passion for teaching a bit). Make sure they feel comfortable getting the information and help them with presenting in a systematic and organized way. It's distasteful to pimp the third years in any way, shape, or form as you're only a sub-i, but I've seen it happen (during rounds!) and it's pretty awkward. I usually just tell them the information or share resources with them vs ask them in question format. After rounds I like to just encourage them and give them a little feedback on their presentation, just be nice about it. Remember, you're still a student but want to start leading a little bit.
Extremely solid post. You should sticky this or make it like Goro’s “how to succeed in medical school” because this is all great info. Thanks for typing it out.
 

Spectreman

2+ Year Member
May 9, 2016
614
1,004
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Hey ya'll, it's been a while! Surprised I got this far tbh!

Comlex 1: 490
Comlex 2: 492
PE: First try pass
Bottom 1/3rd
Some research experience and abstract/journal pubs prior to medical school
Some leadership/volunteer/work things but nothing major
No red flags, pass in most things, HP in family and psych. Generally pretty nice comments about me being cheerful/working hard/needing to be a little more confident.


I wanted to do IM since I really enjoyed inpatient medicine, don't think I want to specialize in anything, not objecting to family medicine either but I only have all my letters for IM in so still kind of stressed about that (my last family letter writer kind of ghosted me). If anyone had similarly low stats from last year or a few years ago and would be willing to tell me some places where they applied and got an interview from I would really appreciate it.. I remember Freida showed Comlex ranges last year but they revamped the site and that no longer shows. I don't mind any rural areas, I'd prefer suburban/urban but I know beggers can't be choosers. I'm a little nervous about east coast IM programs since I've heard stories of it being really malignant so if anyone could share any spots they think wasn't too bad I'd really appreciate it too..

I have 2 auditions currently, but I honestly can't tell if they liked me enough to go to the PD and go 'ignore his score, we want him.' I think I get along well with everyone, offer to do PE checks/scut/consult calls, student soap/progress/DC notes etc but idk I just don't know how to really stand out beyond just staying upbeat and trying to not get in their way. Any feedback on what you felt made you stand out during your auditions I'd appreciate it as well!

But again, thanks for any advice I can get! So excited to move on! :)

If this is the wrong place to ask please let me know where to post and I'll move on over there! It's been so long since I've used SDN!
Hey let’s get an update, how did match turn out for ya?
 
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samac

5+ Year Member
Dec 11, 2014
2,253
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Hey let’s get an update, how did match turn out for ya?
Considering they jumped on for the first time in 3 years to make this post and haven’t done a single thing since I don’t think it’s going to happen.
 
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