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docj1

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Can anyone comment on Marquette's ortho program?
Current residents, interviewees, instructors, or people who have interviewed there in the past. Any info is appreciated.

Thanks DJ1
 

ItsGavinC

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Can anyone comment on Marquette's ortho program?
Current residents, interviewees, instructors, or people who have interviewed there in the past. Any info is appreciated.

Thanks DJ1

I have a friend that graduated from there in 2004 (he also did his DDS there). He enjoyed the program and felt like it was a good experience.
 
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cuneatus2

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Can anyone comment on Marquette's ortho program?
Current residents, interviewees, instructors, or people who have interviewed there in the past. Any info is appreciated.

Thanks DJ1

24 month program. 10 residents (5 in each class).

MS/Certificate program. Master's is required for graduation. If your research is accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal no traditional master's thesis is required. 1 or 2 residents each year will spend a week in Greece doing research for their project. Most residents will do materials related projects, although resources and faculty for basic science research is readily available. All this being said, the focus is heavily on a solid clinical education, rather than research.

A typical week has first years and second years in the clinic from 9-12 in the morning and 1-4 in the afternoon Monday-Friday. First year residents operate 1 chair, second years have 2. The residents share the clinical assistants. There is a strong support of clinical part-time faculty from the surrounding area. Treatment is straight-wire technique. Every resident will have a couple of patients who are treated with a Roth-type philosoply with mounted models in CR. This is nice because you are exposed to the technique without it dominating your education. All bracket systems are incorporated, including many self-ligating systems (Damon, Smart-Clip, In-Ovation-R, etc.). It becomes obvious that it is a clinically-oriented program.

All masters courses are taken during first year, typically from 8-9 am. The courses are mostly seminar-type....not many exams, but an occasional project.

The overall feel of the program is pretty relaxed. The residents that match here are usually focused on becoming a solid clinical orthodontist. If you are interested in hard-core research I would suggest a different program. I think the biggest drawback is the tuition, which is around 30k. I'm just glad we are done in 2 years as opposed to 2.5 or 3.
 

docj1

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Thanks alot that's great information. That sounds like a great program. I am mostly interested in the clinical side. I haven't done much research, but I do realize that some is required in most programs.

Again, Thanks for the info
 

Jone

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a 2yr program costing $30K is cheaper than a 3yr program that is free! =)


I think the biggest drawback is the tuition, which is around 30k. I'm just glad we are done in 2 years as opposed to 2.5 or 3.
 

docj1

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a 2yr program costing $30K is cheaper than a 3yr program that is free! =)

That brings up a good question. Why are some ortho programs 3 years? Is it just that they have historically been 3 or is it because of a larger amount of research required? I'm not being funny, I really don't know.
 

gryffindor

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That brings up a good question. Why are some ortho programs 3 years? Is it just that they have historically been 3 or is it because of a larger amount of research required? I'm not being funny, I really don't know.

The reasoning the residents & faculty will sell you at the interview is "A 3 year program allows you to start and finish your cases. There is a lot to learn about ortho from the finishing stages. It's not just about making the diagnosis in the beginning." I'm sure it's true. I'm in a 3 year program and I feel a little safe that I still have 2.5 years to see what's going on. Teeth have been moving the past 6 months on my patients and I'm still racing to learn and figure out what happens next. I see some of the transfer patients from my previous colleagues and wonder what went on to get to the present scenario. If you had asked me as an applicant, I would have told you I want to be in a 2 year program and get out of residency ASAP. But in regards to Jone's comment, a 3 year free program is still cheaper than a 3 year program with sky-high tuition; and unfortunately, there are several of those out there.

There have been programs that have switched to 3 year programs in recent years. Columbia and Buffalo come to mind, I heard Tufts might be heading in this direction too.

And is there really any program out there that claims to be "research" oriented? Even at supposedly "research heavy" programs like Harvard or UConn, everyone at those places touts how much clinical experience they get and that they are just as strong clinically in spite of the research requirements.
 

kato999

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When I was interviewing at a 3 year program, all the residents were grateful they had three years to complete all their cases. When I interviewed at a 2 year, all the residents where grateful that they are getting to start a year early and didn't think the shorter time hurt them. You won't find too many people that have done both a 2-year and 3 year residency for a comparison, so you will have to make the decision what is a better fit for you. I am personally glad that I get to be an orthodontist in two years.

I personally believe that there will be less and less 2 year programs in the future. Many directors mentioned that they were thinking of moving towards a 30 month or 3 year length.
 

cuneatus2

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And is there really any program out there that claims to be "research" oriented? Even at supposedly "research heavy" programs like Harvard or UConn, everyone at those places touts how much clinical experience they get and that they are just as strong clinically in spite of the research requirements.

I
 

north2southOMFS

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Yes cuneatus, but tell him the best thing about MU is that you get to go to Marquette games. Forget about all that ortho nonsense (it's mostly smoke and mirrors anyhow), and focus on college basketball. Go get a seat at real chili, get yourself a bowl, and check out some march madness.

By the way, is Dr. Villalobos still the director?
 

docj1

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24 month program. 10 residents (5 in each class).

MS/Certificate program. Master's is required for graduation. If your research is accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal no traditional master's thesis is required. 1 or 2 residents each year will spend a week in Greece doing research for their project. Most residents will do materials related projects, although resources and faculty for basic science research is readily available. All this being said, the focus is heavily on a solid clinical education, rather than research.

A typical week has first years and second years in the clinic from 9-12 in the morning and 1-4 in the afternoon Monday-Friday. First year residents operate 1 chair, second years have 2. The residents share the clinical assistants. There is a strong support of clinical part-time faculty from the surrounding area. Treatment is straight-wire technique. Every resident will have a couple of patients who are treated with a Roth-type philosoply with mounted models in CR. This is nice because you are exposed to the technique without it dominating your education. All bracket systems are incorporated, including many self-ligating systems (Damon, Smart-Clip, In-Ovation-R, etc.). It becomes obvious that it is a clinically-oriented program.

All masters courses are taken during first year, typically from 8-9 am. The courses are mostly seminar-type....not many exams, but an occasional project.

The overall feel of the program is pretty relaxed. The residents that match here are usually focused on becoming a solid clinical orthodontist. If you are interested in hard-core research I would suggest a different program. I think the biggest drawback is the tuition, which is around 30k. I'm just glad we are done in 2 years as opposed to 2.5 or 3.

Can I PM you to ask you a few questions?
 
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